Psychosocial Support

A Plethora of Pancreases.

Diabetes Products, Psychosocial Support By September 16, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , 8 Comments

Etsy is great for finding pretty jewelry.  Or beautiful gifts for a baby.  But then you can find yourself deep down the rabbit hole of purchasable pancreases, and that’s where shit gets weird. Here are some of the search-return endocrine gems that popped up: Crochet Plush Pancreas from An Optimistic Cynic Anatomical Pancreas Cufflinks from Anatomy Art Gall Bladder, Spleen,…

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Filling Back Up.

Diabetes Advocacy, Diabetes and Emotions, Diabetes and Family, Diabetes Complications, Psychosocial Support, Real Life Diabetes By September 12, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , 65 Comments

It whispered in my ear two January’s ago, when a low blood sugar came too close to becoming terrifying as I felt the whoosh of that bullet go by. I’d never felt anything like that before, that aftermath of fear and numbness.  Then I marked twenty six years with type 1 diabetes, and I just wanted to outrun this disease,…

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FFL: Social Media as Part of the Prescription.

Diabetes Advocacy, Diabetes Community, Diabetes Online Community, Psychosocial Support, Real Life Diabetes By August 13, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , 3 Comments

At Friends for Life this  year, there was a special panel discussing “Social Media & The Monster Under the Bed: The Latest Thinking on Fearing vs. Embracing Social Media,” focusing on efforts to validate the role of peer-to-peer support in diabetes management.  Moderated by members of the diabetes online community, the panelists included: Korey Hood, PhD – Associate Clinical Professor…

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Define? Or explain.

Diabetes Advocacy, Diabetes and Emotions, Psychosocial Support, Real Life Diabetes By May 2, 2006 Tags: , No Comments

“Diabetes doesn’t define you, it just helps explain you.” It struck me that he was right. Darrell and I don’t talk about diabetes very much. I don’t remember ever talking about it when we were kids. We played with Legos and built army forts for the hamsters to live in. There weren’t any big diabetes discussions and, quite frankly, we…

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