There’s power to the “me, too!” moments for sure, but there’s vulnerability involved in raising your hand first to say, “Me.”  Today, I have a guest post from a writer who wished to stay anonymous but who is looking for others who may have experienced something similar to what they went through.  If you’ve ever passed out or had a seizure, or have experienced a pocket of time where you know something diabetes-related happened but you can’t quite explain it, please leave a comment for this writer.  They need community now, more than ever.

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The day was just like any other. Except it was a Friday before vacation where the afternoon is extra stressful to complete everything before heading out and not looking back for one week. That morning the Dexcom sensor was incredibly itchy, so I removed it.

When the work day was done I left with a bunch of errands to run before I could really enjoy myself. At the first stop I couldn’t find my wallet in my bag even though I knew it was in there. I was disoriented and didn’t know why. I kept apologizing.  I was so embarrassed about my lack of functionality that I returned to my car with nothing completed for my errand.

An hour later I “woke up” confused as to where my phone could possibly be. I found it in the trunk of my car. There is no memory of what happened after I sat down in my car (parked). However, as soon as I woke up I knew I had passed out. Presumably from a low blood sugar based on my actions during my errand. Based on the location of my phone, I believe it is possible I seized as well. I have no way to confirm or deny this assumption.

I do not know if this will ever happen again. I do not know how I came-to on my own. I do not know why I am lucky enough to have survived this. I do know that I reached out to my support system. I reached out to the people who would take it as is and not freak out. I was doing enough of that on my own. I do know that it is a hard event to move on from. I also know I’m not willing to let the whole world know yet.

But! Has anyone had this happen to them? Or something similar? How did you continue to live your whole life with diabetes without this always being in the back of your mind? Or front and center? Did you over treat? Or start treating almost lows, which weren’t lows but actually acceptable blood sugars? How do you keep your focus on your sugars and not raise your perception of what’s an “acceptable blood sugar”?

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I’m glad you’re okay, Anonymous.

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