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Posts tagged ‘World Diabetes Day’

Do More Good.

It’s World Diabetes Day.  YAY!  And buried amongst the bits of distressing-as-hell news crap out there will be articles about diabetes. Casual mentions of this monster that lives under our bed (and that we feed occasionally). And tomorrow, the world’s attention will twist to the next crisis.

But oh, my fellow PWD, we’ll still be on this diabetes journey long past today. And tomorrow. We’re in this for the long haul (until the days we can slap on a device and let it do diabetes for us, or until they science us up a biological cure for this mess).

Which means that we’re all in the same boat.

Which might sound a bit distressing and a little overwhelming.  BUT.

We can do something now.   We can do something to create and contribute to a rising tide of positivity and hope.  We can make a difference.

Dude.  We can do more good.

That’s what I want to do.  I want to be part of the tide that lifts all boats, so that we, as a community, can ferret out some happy and find something other than despair in our timelines.  Do more good.

There’s no hashtag.  No separate website for this.  It’s not a “campaign” and there’s not a Twitter chat or email sign up or thing you have to subscribe to.  All you need to do is take a moment and make a concerted effort to do something good, or share something good, or contribute to something good.

Donate to a cause that you find powerfully good.  Share a story from an organization or an individual that you care about.  Pay for someone’s coffee.  Say thank you when someone holds the damn door.  Give a hug to someone in your family before they need one.  Grin at someone.  Tell someone you love them.  Tell yourself you love yourself, too, while you’re at it.

Small moments can amount to big changes.  Create a moment of happiness for yourself and someone else by doing more good.  I refuse to believe that the world is actually becoming worse, not when I see so many people who are making a difference, both big and small.

We can all do more good.

Do more good.

Do more good.

Do more good.

 

World Diabetes Day 2016.

It’s World Diabetes Day.  And how do I feel, after 30 years with type 1 diabetes under my belt (and above my belt and in every organ and all over my face)?

LUCKY.  Effing lucky.  Because according to the demands of my body, I should not be here, but because of science and access, I am alive.

I clicked on the Google homepage today and saw that, finally, after years of asking and hoping to see Google acknowledge the diabetes community through a Google doodle, our community was highlighted on the homepage.  There we were, represented in retro fashion, alerting the world that people with diabetes would be absolutely sunk without the contributions of Dr. Frederick Banting almost 100 years ago.

If I had been diagnosed before Banting and his crew changed the diabetes world, I would have died, my body starving to death as a result of not making insulin.  Insulin is crucial to my survival.  Seeing 90 days worth of insulin collected in my kitchen is pretty damn humbling.  What keeps me alive is stored next to the butter in my fridge, and that’s beyond humbling.

I do not take this life for granted.  

Today, on World Diabetes Day, more people are paying attention.  Even this whole month, with the focus on diabetes, people are tuning in and listening. We have their ear.  So grab them by that ear and remind them that diabetes month is November, and diabetes day is today, but diabetes is EVERY DAY for people touched by it.  We’ll still be stashing our butter compartments with insulin in December, and every December after that.

How can people help, way past today and this month?

I’m glad you asked.

People can donate to the International Diabetes Federation’s Life for a Child program.  They can also gear up for the Spare a Rose campaign, which takes place every February.  If your butter compartment is stashed with insulin, consider those who don’t have access and please help.  You can donate directly by clicking here.

They can also explore some of the diabetes advocacy organizations, like the JDRF or American Diabetes Association, or some of the more grassroots groups like Children with Diabetes, the Diabetes Hands Foundation, Riding on Insulinthe Betes Organization, Nightscout Foundation, Diabetes SistersDPACConnecT1D, the Diabetes Community Advocacy Foundation, DOColors, or Glu.  Or any of the other ones I haven’t listed, because there are many.

Participate in the Big Blue Test, or the World Diabetes Day 24 hour chat (#WDDchat16).  Or share their stories through the JDRF, ADA, or IDF campaigns.  You can do that RIGHT THIS SECOND.

If healthcare professionals are checking in on this post, please consider recommending the diabetes online community as a resource for your patients.  AADE President Hope Warshaw has created a one-sheet to help HCPs jump into the space, and there’s always the #DSMA chats that take place on Wednesday nights at 9 pm eastern.  Peer-to-peer connections can make all the difference for your patience.  Please encourage exploring the DOC as an option for your patients.

And give.  Give financially to organizations that lift the message you want lifted.  Give your time to efforts that improve the diabetes experience.  Give your story life outside of the diabetes bubble and give the gift of education and information to people who aren’t familiar with diabetes.

Happy World Diabetes Day, you guys.  Continue to educate, to change the game, to disrupt, to make a difference.  Continue being you, making crummy use of insulin but making an enormous difference for people with diabetes.  <3

 

Revisiting: Undefined.

“You have diabetes  You seem fine.” “I am fine.”
Diabetes makes me walk the precarious fine line
Between “I’m sick” and “I’m not” and the whole in-between
That makes diabetes invisible, and yet so seen.

“Needles?  Every day?  I could never,”
You could.  And you would, and you’d do it forever
If that’s what kept you from good life or harm,
You’d never think twice of needles in your arm.

“You seem fine.”  “I am fine, at least I think?”
I try not to let it push me to the brink
But even my best days are still diabetic
And on some days I feel frustrated, mad, or pathetic.

I can follow the rules and try to appease
The needs and requirements of relentless disease,
But even my best days are burnt at the edge
By the efforts that work their way in like a wedge.

“You seem fine.”  I am fine, except days when I’m not.
But I do what I’m told, and I learn what I’m taught.
And I’ll keep working harder to keep from the claws
Of an illness that doesn’t do “rewind” or “pause.”

Will it stop me?  It might, I can’t lie – and that’s scary
But between now and then, I throw all these hail marys.
It’s life, and it’s mine, and I won’t let it bear
The weight of a heart and mind wraught with fear.

There are miles to run, and children to hold.
There are travels to have, and stories to be told.
Diabetes?  Intense, and it looms, and it’s giant
But I’m more than my pancreas.  I’ve become self-reliant.

I may host beta cells that checked out long ago
But I refuse to accept the assumed status quo.
I’ll work harder, think smarter.  I’m not resigned
To accept limitation.  I live life undefined.

Another #DayOfDiabetes, Twitter-Style.

For World Diabetes Day yesterday, I attempted to participate in another round of #dayofdiabetes, using Twitter to log the different nuances of a day with type 1 diabetes.  It was a tougher day than normal, Internet-wise, because I spent the morning in the plane and the rest of the afternoon with very limited access to Wifi, but it was World Diabetes Day, damn it, so I wanted to try.

My #dayofdiabetes started early … like 2.10 am kind of early, with a low blood sugar and a buzzing Dexcom:

But thankfully, glucose tabs handy on the bedside table made fixing this number easier:

Glucose tabs help keep me from over-treating, because they are carefully portioned out and not appealing enough to have an urge to eat sixty of them.   It feels like a win, not over-treating a nasty middle-of-the-night low.  I was relieved to check in the morning and see that I wasn’t off the charts.

And then I was off to the races … or more specifically, the airport, to travel to Mississauga for the Peel Chapter JDRF Research Symposium.

The low from the night before still hung around in the form of exhaustion, though.

And airport food offerings weren’t substantial enough to fix what ailed me.

Later in the evening, it was time to dress/device juggle:

Never a simple task, especially with disco boobs:

The night at the World Diabetes Day event was lovely, but I did miss participating in the discussions online, particularly the World Diabetes Day 24 hour chat that took place all day yesterday.  Community and peer-to-peer connections keep me as healthy as my insulin does, some days.

And this morning it all starts again, with a blood glucose check on my meter and that instant yearning for a cup of coffee.

Every day is a #dayofdiabetes in my life, wifi or not.  It was amazing, catching up on the Twitter feeds of others who were participating yesterday.  I learn so much about how individualized everyone’s diabetes truly is through this project.

Here is some info, if you’d like to participate in a #dayofdiabetes, and a primer on Twitter and the diabetes community.

 

World Diabetes Day 2013.

“You have diabetes  You seem fine.” “I am fine.”
Diabetes makes me walk the precarious fine line
Between “I’m sick” and “I’m not” and the whole in-between
That makes diabetes invisible, and yet so seen.

“Needles?  Every day?  I could never,”
You could.  And you would, and you’d do it forever
If that’s what kept you from good life or harm,
You’d never think twice of needles in your arm.

“You seem fine.”  “I am fine, at least I think?”
I try not to let it push me to the brink
But even my best days are still diabetic
And on some days I feel frustrated, mad, or pathetic.

I can follow the rules and try to appease
The needs and requirements of relentless disease,
But even my best days are burnt at the edge
By the efforts that work their way in like a wedge.

“You seem fine.”  I am fine, except days when I’m not.
But I do what I’m told, and I learn what I’m taught.
And I’ll keep working harder to keep from the claws
Of an illness that doesn’t do “rewind” or “pause.”

Will it stop me?  It might, I can’t lie – and that’s scary
But between now and then, I throw all these hail marys.
It’s life, and it’s mine, and I won’t let it bear
The weight of a heart and mind wraught with fear.

There are miles to run, and children to hold.
There are travels to have, and stories to be told.
Diabetes?  Intense, and it looms, and it’s giant
But I’m more than my pancreas.  I’ve become self-reliant.

I may host beta cells that checked out long ago
But I refuse to accept the assumed status quo.
I’ll work harder, think smarter.  I’m not resigned
To accept limitation.  I live life undefined.

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