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Posts tagged ‘type 2 diabetes’

Interview: Anna Norton on the Future of Diabetes Sisters.

Organizations that bring people touched by diabetes together have a special place in my heart, because peer-to-peer support checks that “whole person care” box on the mental diabetes management to do list.  The Diabetes Sisters organization is a group that brings women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes together in an environment that fosters open discussion, camaraderie, and learning.  Today I’m talking with Interim CEO Anna Norton, who is helping transition the organization into a new era.

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Kerri:  Thanks for taking the time to talk today, Anna!  We’ve known one another a long time, and you’ve been part of the Diabetes Sisters organization for years.  Can you tell me a little bit about how you got involved with DS?

Anna Norton:  Thank you, Kerri, for taking time out to interview me! I initially became involved with DiabetesSisters in 2011, when I attended my first Weekend for Women Conference in Raleigh, NC. That was the first time I had ever experienced being in a room with 99 other women with diabetes. I never realized how much I needed their understanding and support until that weekend; before that, I just managed on my own. Following that event, I was asked to join the planning committee for future conferences. In 2012, Brandy asked me to join the DiabetesSisters’ staff full time as Operations Manager, where I oversaw the National PODS Meetup program (our monthly support group meetings), the Weekend for Women Conference Series, online contributors, and other programs. Over the last four years, I’ve gotten to know so many people with diabetes, so many “movers and shakers” in the diabetes community, including you!

Kerri:  What is your personal connection to diabetes?  How does your personal experience color your involvement with Diabetes Sisters?

Anna Norton:  I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1993, when I was 18 years old. Initially, I had a few years of okay management, followed by years of noncompliance, depression and poor medical care. Eventually, I faced the reality that diabetes was controlling me and holding me back. Once I realized that, I was able to make changes in my management, starting with finding a new endocrinologist and going on a pump. Then I fulfilled my personal dream of getting married and having a child, which so many people told me I would never be able to do.  It’s been 15 years since I “transformed” my diabetes care and I’ve never looked back. Over the years, I have met so many women through DiabetesSisters, all at different stages in their diabetes care. I see myself in so many of them: a younger version of myself struggling to figure out how diabetes plays a role in her future, a mom managing both diabetes and a young child, a professional figuring out how diabetes will affect her career. I am inspired by every woman I meet living with diabetes, thriving with it, each with her own story of success. It’s important to me to have these women in my life, to support and guide me, and in turn, for me to do the same for them.

Kerri:  With Brandy leaving the organization (and she will be missed!), how do you see yourself stepping up and taking charge of this amazing group?

Anna Norton:  Brandy really did an excellent job in building a strong foundation for DiabetesSisters and for that, we are grateful. Over the last three years, she and I teamed up to create more programming to serve our online population and train more women to lead our PODS Meetups – monthly support groups that meet in over 30 cities throughout the US, including an online meetup. Over the years, Brandy entrusted me with the care of DiabetesSisters on so many levels, all the moving parts became very familiar to me. When Brandy decided to step down, the Board of Directors asked me to step into the Interim CEO role and continue the work. In my new role, I have the opportunity to meet supporters and funders that have helped shape the success of DiabtesSisters, and I get to share our member stories with them, as well as represent their needs. It’s important our funders to know how much their support helps change lives.

Kerri:  What are you most excited about, as CEO?  What scares you the most?  And how can the DOC help as you transition?

Anna Norton: I am definitely excited about continuing on this great path, growing our programs and services, adding more topics to our webinars, and reaching as many women as we can. I’m excited about adding some services for underserved populations, such as African American and Hispanic women. I have a busy summer ahead of me, representing DiabetesSisters at various conferences. The biggest challenge, though, is our small staff, although we’ve had some key volunteers step up to plate to help out, which is fantastic! During this time, I’d love for the DOC to reach out to me, introduce themselves virtually or in-person, and learn more about how the organization can serve them or ways we can partner up to impact more lives. I’d love to see women in the DOC step up as leaders and create more PODS Meetup groups in their communities, share their stories with the community through our website blogs, and provide online support through their own blogs.

Kerri:  Will the PODS meetings still continue?  How about regional conferences?

Anna Norton:  Of course! We just completed a weekend Leadership Institute for our PODS Leaders, which focused on more training for them. This program is, by far, our largest in-person, serving over 1,200 women annually, with a balance of education and support once a month.

Our national Conference Series – Weekend for Women, along with the Partners’ Perspective Program – is still alive, although we took this year off to focus on the Leadership Institute. It’s always a challenge with limited funds, so we’ve tried to provide the best programming in 2015.

Kerri:  What’s next for Diabetes Sisters, and how can the DOC get involved?

Anna Norton:  Our future is bright – and I’m glad to be a part of it. This is a time of continued growth for DiabetesSisters, and for all diabetes-related organizations. There’s so much to learn, so many treatments to trial, so much support to be provided. The DOC can move mountains with its influence, and encourage their audience to learn more about DiabetesSisters, read our website (www.diabetessisters.org), subscribe to our e-newsletter, listen to our webinars, and most importantly, get the word out about how we are a one-of-a-kind organization focusing on the emotional and social well-being of all women living with all kinds of diabetes.

Kerri:  Where do you see Diabetes Sisters in six months?  A year?  Five years?

Anna Norton:  That’s a great question! I definitely see DiabetesSisters continuing on the path of growth. With a great Board of Directors leading, there’s no doubt that will happen. In the near future, we will continue to build upon the foundation that is set, growing existing programs, trialing new ones, listening to our members and providing for their needs. Over the course of the following years, I see great partnership being forged with other organizations, maximizing our potentials in the diabetes support world. Eventually, I envision DiabetesSisters as the go-to for women living with diabetes to learn more about every stage of life including the years of young adulthood, relationship, pregnancy, parenting, peri-menopause and beyond, advance duration, etc.

Thank you, Kerri, for allowing me this opportunity, for being a DiabetesSisters’ cheerleader and for giving so much of yourself to the organization. I am excited to expand my role in the DOC and contribute to the support of our community!

#WalkWithD: Lorrian’s Type 2 Experience.

(This might look familiar to you …)  A few weeks ago, I wrote about how I was seeking to learn more about my peers with diabetes, specifically folks with type 2 diabetes.  Living with type 1 diabetes myself, it’s hard to me to “walk a mile in their shoes,” so to speak, when I felt so uninformed about type 2 diabetes in the first place.  A few people left comments on that post, and I’ve been working to bring more of their journey with type 2 diabetes into the forefront, so I can learn from them, and so we can learn as a community. 

Last week, John shared his story, and this week, Lorrian is sharing hers.  Lorrian Ippoliti has been living with type 2 diabetes for almost 11 years, she is a native Californian, and she has been married to her husband, Mike, for nine years.  Today, I’m grateful that she’s sharing her #walkwithd.

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The year before my diagnosis, my primary care physician called me and told me that my annual blood work showed that my “sugar (was) high” and that I “should watch it.”  Watch my sugar? What did that mean?  I didn’t ask, and my doctor didn’t offer.  [She certainly didn’t say anything about pre-diabetes]

The following year, my doctor’s office asked me to return so my doctor could review my blood work in person.  My doctor told me I had type 2 diabetes, gave me a sheet of paper about low carb diets, a prescription for Glucovance, and told me to “call me after you pick a meter.”  [My A1c was 13.4, but she didn’t explain what that meant]

That. Was. It.

No referral to an endocrinologist, no suggestions for reading materials or classes, no direction on how to choose/where to find a meter, and I was too stunned and frightened to ask any questions.

My husband and I researched diabetes (thank goodness for the Internet) and made drastic changes to our diet because of our fear, which led to multiple hypoglycemic episodes (chugging fruit juice in Costco, anyone?).  A coworker of mine explained to me about meters and showed me how to test, and a coworker of my husband’s referred me to an endocrinologist.

The endo took me off Glucovance, which eliminated most of my hypo episodes.

Even with my husband’s support, the first 8 years were awful, full of misery and fear and guilt.  The drastic diet changes we’d made were hard to sustain and I was constantly battling food and trying to make sense of how my body reacted to it.  I somehow got my A1c below 7, only to have it climb back up to the 11-ish range as I alternately rebelled or gave into feelings of helplessness.

Eventually, that endo told me there was nothing else medically she could do for me.  Yeah, a doctor gave up on me.

I completely gave up on myself after that.  I continued to take my medications, but for about a year I didn’t see any doctors at all.  I didn’t think anyone could help me or would listen to me.  (Even my dermatologist argued with me about the name of one of my diabetes medications, insisting that there was no such thing as Glimepiride and writing down Glyburide in my chart instead, so I gave up on him!)

Eventually, my husband told me how worried he was about me and that he wanted me to live for a long time.  Mike had found a nutritional therapist and we began seeing her as a couple.  Then he asked me to see his primary care physician, who turned out to be the first doctor to listen to my frustrations and fear.  He was so caring and agreed to manage my medications, but told me he wanted me to find an endo and gave me a six month deadline.

I found a new endocrinologist who is kind and compassionate, and both a cheerleader and a taskmaster.  She listens to me, celebrates my small victories, and pushes me to accomplish more than I believed I could.   Was there anything she medically she could do for me?  Sure!  She tweaked my medications, taking me off Glimepiride, increasing my Actos, and adding Lantus (insulin) and Victoza (an injectable which slows the emptying of my stomach).  (These medications were all available when I was seeing the previous endo.)

I’ve gained weight using Lantus, but my A1c has decreased from 11-ish to 7-ish.  I’m also back to having hypo episodes (one or two a month).  It’s a frustrating trade-off.

About two years ago my endo prescribed a Dexcom CGM, which has helped change my outlook about having diabetes.

For example, my endo wants me to have a glucose level of 100 mg/dl when I wake, which has been impossible for me to achieve and made me feel like a failure.  Using the CGM revealed that I have dawn phenomenon.  Seeing my glucose level in action relieved a lot of frustration – and – my endo can see that I hang out around 100 mg/dl for much of the night, but my level usually rises 30-40 points starting around 4:30am.  Plus, as an accountant I’m a data geek and having access to my numbers round the clock has helped me see patterns related to food and activity.

It has been an arduous journey since my diagnosis.  I’ve gone through the various stages of grief – indeed multiple times it seems – and I believe I’ve finally arrived at acceptance.  I can live with diabetes.

Kerri’s blog has been a touchstone for me throughout my journey – her openness about the challenges she faces have helped me know that I’m not alone, and I especially appreciate learning about the technology available to us.  In fact, my endo was impressed that I already knew what a CGM was, and now I’ve added CGM in the Cloud/The Nightscout Project to my diabetes management. (I HIGHLY recommend it!)

I share John’s outlook on what the designation type 1 vs. type 2 means.   Despite how we each developed diabetes, I feel that those of us with the disease share many more similarities than differences.   I want to thank Kerri from the bottom of my heart for inviting me to share my story and I’m looking forward to the future.

Thank you so much for sharing your story, Lorrian!!!

#WalkWithD: John’s Story.

A few weeks ago, I wrote about how I was seeking to learn more about my peers with diabetes, specifically folks with type 2 diabetes.  Living with type 1 diabetes myself, it’s hard to me to “walk a mile in their shoes,” so to speak, when I felt so uninformed about type 2 diabetes in the first place.  A few people left comments on that post, and I’ve been working to bring more of their journey with type 2 diabetes into the forefront, so I can learn from them, and so we can learn as a community. 

I want to know what it’s like to walk with type 2 diabetes, and today, John, a self-proclaimed 67 year old “youngster” and currently living in the southeast Alaska panhandle, is answering a few questions about what life is like for him.

Kerri:  Thanks for taking the time to chat with me today, John.  When were you diagnosed with type 2 diabetes?

John:  I think it was October 18, 2007.

Kerri:  Did you know anything about diabetes before your diagnosis?

John:  Yes a little, I had a cousin, uncle and a niece that had type 1 and even though I was a few years older than my niece we used to play together as children and were quite close.  I was also a babysitter to her when she was young.

Kerri:  How did your diagnosis impact you, physically?  How about emotionally?

John:  I was told to lose some pounds, I was 260 when diagnosed and they wanted me down to 190.  It took me almost a year to get 196 and I found that I couldn’t maintain it and feel comfortable at all, so I let my weight drift back up to about 210 and have remained at that weight ever since.

Emotionally?  I was relieved, I was having some heart problems and it seemed to me that it was getting worse and the doctors couldn’t figure out why.   Then one of the E.R. doctors noticed that every time I showed up in ER that my blood sugar was somewhat elevated.  That led to an A1c, which was off the chart.

Kerri:  Now that you are a few years into your diabetes journey, what have you learned along the way?

John:  Quite a lot about the disease, I at first researched Type 2 only and then I read an article about how diabetes progresses in the body if left unchecked and I thought at first that it was an article about Type 1, but then as I reread the article again I realized that it did not make any difference how the diagnoses was made it was the same disease.  The only difference was in how we each contracted it.  Right now, it is known that in the PWD’s T1, the immune system attacks the insulin producing cells of the pancreas  and destroys them, and, PWD’s T2’s there are several ways that the same cells are either destroyed or made to under-perform.  The end result is a disease called diabetes.  So I then stopped looking at it as the type of diabetes someone had and started to notice how they were treating their diabetes, so that I may be able to treat mine better.

Kerri:  What makes you want to tell people about your diabetes journey?  Why do you think it’s important for people with all kinds of diabetes to share their stories?

John:  My story is going to be similar to someone out there and just maybe that person needs to know that they are not alone.  The more people that stop being afraid of this disease and start letting people know that they have this disease the more that diabetes will be recognized as a viable threat to their own health.

Kerri:  What do you want people to know about life with type 2 diabetes?

John:  What I want everyone to realize is that I don’t have “type 2 diabetes” but that I do have “diabetes” and the way it came about is type 2(reason unknown).  I treat my diabetes just the same as many thousands of other diabetics and it does not make one bit of difference what type it is.  Being a certain type is good for person to person conversations in a give and take on how we treat our own version of diabetes and it’s good that our doctors know, but beyond that it’s useless.  Living with diabetes is not easy, it takes a lot of time that I would like to be doing other things.  It often times scares the heck out of me and it is not a set in stone science, it at times does things that seems to defy all reason and it will bite you if you don’t pay attention.  It never stops and that is the worst one, it is there all the time, no letup.  But with knowledge and the right tools it can be managed and quite well, just not controlled, at least not by me.

To every negative there should be a positive, my positive is that I am in better general health than almost all of my friends that don’t have diabetes, you see, I now take the time to take care of myself, eat right, exercise.  Before I was diagnosed with diabetes I never seemed to have the time to do those things.

Thank you so much for sharing, John, and I’m looking forward to sharing more perspectives from my type 2 peers in the coming weeks. 

If you are living with diabetes of any kind, please raise your voice.  Your story matters!  #walkwithd

#DOCasksFDA – Your Feedback is Needed, DOC!

THIS IS THE LINK TO THE SURVEYRead below for more information on the virtual discussion between the diabetes community and the FDA, and how your input will shape that discussion, and potentially our future.

“On November 3 from 1pm-4pm EDT, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the diabetes community will host an unprecedented event to discuss unmet needs in diabetes. As a community, our job is to present the numerous challenges we as patients face each day, and we need your opinions to be a part of this discussion! Please fill out this short survey to share your thoughts on what’s important to you when it comes to living with diabetes. Your feedback will go directly to FDA and help influence the conversation on November 3.

Please answer the questions that follow as honestly as you can. Your answers could affect the way the FDA perceives unmet needs in diabetes, and ultimately, how it reviews the risks and benefits of new drugs and devices.”

THIS IS THE LINK TO THE SURVEY AGAIN.  IT IS IN ALL CAPS BECAUSE IT IS IMPORTANT AND YOU ARE IMPORTANT AND YOUR OPINIONS ARE IMPORTANT.  As a community, we need to raise our voices.  Please show the FDA that we are many, we are empowered, and we are loud.

Link coming soon so that you can register for the discussion, but in the meantime, please fill out the survey and share it with your DOC friends.  And thanks!!

Seeking PWD Peers.

Two weeks ago, I was in Vienna for the third annual European Animas Blogger Summit.  (I’m a blogger, and I have a working relationship with Animas.  Only missing the European part, and I can’t even pretend because I was once told that my attempt at a British accent was akin to Dick Van Dyke’s Mary Poppins attempt.  So, no.)  Other folks who were in attendance have written about their impressions and take-aways, but the discussions we had can’t be concisely covered in a blog post.  It would take several blog posts.

So, in keeping with that theme, this blog post is centered around one of the discussions that embedded itself into my head:  connecting with PWD who are living with type 2 diabetes.

It started with a conversation about the #walkwithd campaign.

“The Walk with D campaign is about showing people what diabetes is really like, peeling back the stigma and reinstating dignity.  We do this already through blogs and Twitter and Facebook updates and all of the photos we share with our community and society as a whole.  The hashtag is simply a way to link some of these discussions, and to share more.  But, in looking around the room, I see a lot of kindred spirits who are dealing with type 1 diabetes.  Where are the type 2 voices?”

I don’t know much at all about life with type 2 diabetes. Sure, I can look it up on dLife or WebMD or some other resource that gives a high-level definition of type 2 diabetes, but that doesn’t give me a sense of what it’s actually like to live with type 2 diabetes.

My lack of perspective used to be rooted in straight up ignorance.  Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as a child, I actively sought to separate myself from my type 2 peers because I didn’t want people thinking “I did this to myself.”  And I have to put that statement in quotes because it’s such a crummy one, now that I know so much more about the differences and similarities between all types of diabetes.

It’s difficult to talk about how I felt when people lumped type 1 and type 2 together.  I’m embarrassed to admit these things.  The diseases are different in their origin but so similar in how they map out physically, and more importantly, emotionally, and I wish I had known that earlier.  I wish I had been more supportive of my type 2 peers.  I wish I had known how they felt.

And that’s the part I truly want to better understand.  How does it FEEL to live with type 2?

Rachel at Refreshing D was one of the first people who had type 2 diabetes who I really got to know.  Through her columns at dLife, her blog, and through becoming friends, I had a reliable window into life with type 2 diabetes.  I don’t know if I can properly articulate how much she has taught me, or thank her for being brave enough to share her story.  With Rachel as my gateway to understanding type 2 diabetes, I connected to and learned from people like Travis, Sue, Kate, and Bob.  People who live with diabetes – just not the type I’m familiar with – but who I need to better understand in order to best understand this community.

“I wish more people with type 2 would raise their voices.  How can we encourage them to?  How can we empower them to?”

The discussion during the blogger summit was frustrating in that none of us had a clear answer, but we realized that the responsibility for creating an empowering and inviting environment was on the DOC, both globally and in our respective countries.  We, as people with type 1 diabetes, are smaller in number in society but we tend to dominate the Diabetes Online Community, and I think it’s up to us to help pave the way for people with type 2 diabetes to feel comfortable coming out of their diabetes cave and sharing their perspectives.  Stigma runs rampant regarding diabetes, but we can help change it from the inside by getting to know our peers.  Finding what unites us can help us better understand one another as people and can help us all feel like we’re part of a community that has our back.

If you’re living with type 2 diabetes and you’re reading this post, please share your journey.

I walk with diabetes, but I don’t walk alone.  And neither do you.

An In-Depth Look at the Diabetes UnConference.

Peer to peer support has been shown to be highly beneficial to those living with diabetes. The report, “Peer Support in Health – Evidence to Action,” summarizing findings from the first National Peer Support Collaborative Learning Network shared that: “Among 20 studies of diabetes management, 19 showed statistically significant evidence of benefits of peer support.”  In keeping with that theme, The Diabetes UnConference, the first peer-to-peer support conference for all adults with diabetes, is on tap for March 2015.

Founded by Christel Marchand Aprigliano, The Diabetes UnConference is facilitated by volunteers well known to the diabetes community: Bennet Dunlap, Heather Gabel, Manny Hernandez, Scott K. Johnson, George Simmons, Dr. Nicole Berelos, PhD, MPH, CDE and Kerri Sparling [me ... can you tell this part was a bit of a cut-and-paste from the "about" page on the UnConference website?  Yes ma'am.]  These diabetes community leaders are familiar with the topics that will be covered; each live with diabetes.

The Diabetes UnConference will be held at the Flamingo Las Vegas from March 12 – 15, 2015, and today, I’m talking with founder Christel Aprigliano about the when, how, and most importantly the why of this ground-breaking event.

Kerri:  I know you.  And think you’re awesome.  For those who haven’t met you yet, who are you, and what’s your connection to diabetes?

Christel:  I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of Six Until Me times two. (That would be twelve years old, if you have problems with math like I do.)  I didn’t know many other Type 1s growing up and spent a lot of my teens and early 20s ignoring the physical and psychological issues of having this disease. I had a great medical team that stuck with me and helped me to learn how to live with it, not fight against it.

In August of 2005, I complained to my then boyfriend (now husband) that there weren’t any weekly podcasts about diabetes. Next thing I knew, we had started diabeticfeed, talking about diabetes research news and interviewing people doing amazing things with diabetes. (This interview was in January, 2006 with a woman named Kerri Morrone. We talked about Jettas and diabetes.)

I joke about being a part of the DOC before it was the DOC. While we stopped producing diabeticfeed, I’m doing other things: writing at ThePerfectD, working with other advocates on cool projects like StripSafely and CGMSafely and founding The Diabetes UnConference. While I’m not thrilled to have diabetes, some of my most favorite people in the universe came from connecting with others because of it.

Kerri:  There are a lot of conferences that center around diabetes.  Why the UnConference? 

Christel:  I’ve been to a lot of diabetes conferences and some of the best experiences I’ve had are not in the research sessions or keynote presentations; it’s hallway moments when I’m connecting with another Type 1 or sitting around a lunch table sharing stories and tips. I would leave these conferences wishing that I had more time to talk about the emotional aspects of having this disease and how to live well with it.

During a brainstorming session at the Medtronic Advocacy Summit in January, a question was asked: “What could you do this year in the diabetes community to make a difference?” And the next thing I know, I’m saying that I wanted to have a conference that would bring adults with diabetes together to talk about living with diabetes and learning from each other  – an “unconference.”  (Unconference is a concept made popular by the tech community, where the agenda is decided by the participants during the first hour of the conference. No keynotes, no research sessions, just talking and sharing in a safe environment where there’s no judgement.)

What also makes The Diabetes UnConference unique is that it will bring type 1 and type 2 adults together in one room for a multi-day conference. No other conference does that. We all have non-functioning pancreases (only varying by degree), we have many of the same long-term complications, we all have to deal with depression and burnout and stigma, and we all want to live well with diabetes. We can learn from each other in a safe environment.

Kerri:  What was the scariest thing about taking the leap to put this conference together?  What was the most empowering?

Christel:  The scariest thing has been the idea that I’d be sitting in a huge meeting room in Las Vegas by myself, eating several thousands of dollars worth of food by myself to fulfill the contract that I signed with The Flamingo. I don’t have enough insulin to bolus for it all! (Thankfully, everyone I’ve spoken with about The Diabetes UnConference has been excited about it.)

Really it’s the idea that there people out there who need and want to talk with other people with diabetes and don’t know that this exists. It’s always that way with something new and innovative, isn’t it? We also have scholarships available for those who do want to come but may not have the financial resources to attend.

The most empowering? Knowing that it’s the community that is making this happen. I may have had the initial idea, but without amazing facilitators and participants who want to create this unforgettable experience is mind-blowing. This is about a community helping each other, learning from each other, and connecting with each other. This community empowers me to believe that we can do so much when we listen to each other.

Kerri:  Why should people attend the conference?

Christel:  We spent a few hours each year talking with our healthcare team, mostly about lab results and medication adjustments or treatment recommendations. The rest of the year, we’re on our own. We don’t have time to talk with them about our feelings surrounding living day-to-day with diabetes.

Our community is amazing. We can talk about the emotional aspects of living with diabetes online, but nothing can take the place of looking into each other’s eyes when you talk about fears and burnout. It’s rare to find someone willing to talk about diabetes sexual dysfunction in public, but by creating a safe environment where others might have the same issue and may have a solution? You may not feel comfortable talking about job discrimination online, but in person? I want people to have a safe place where they can express their feelings and get support and hopefully options…

Plus, when the diabetes community gets together, we build these incredible friendships and have an insane amount of fun. Laughter is always in ample supply.

I don’t want people to feel alone with their diabetes. I felt alone for years. That’s why people should attend.

Kerri:  How can people register? 

Christel:  Go to www.DiabetesUnConference.com to register and learn more about the conference. (It’s March 13 – 15, 2015 and being held at The Flamingo Las Vegas. We got great rates for the hotel, too!)

Our scholarship applications are open until September 30, 2014.

We’ve got some wonderful surprises up our sleeve, thanks to our sponsors. Insulet, Dexcom, Roche, and B-D have committed to helping make this conference happen, and I’m so grateful. (That being said, any company who is interested in helping can contact us and be a part of this.)

Kerri:  Thanks, Christel.  And for those reading, the scholarship applications are open until September 30th, so if you’d like to apply, please click over and send in your applicationHope to see you all in March in Las Vegas!!

Drafting Off #DSMA: Diabetes Job Description.

I love tuning in to the diabetes discussions on Twitter – they are always insightful and make me see things through a different (insulin-colored?) lens. The final question of last night’s #dsma chat really brought out some interesting responses:

I wasn’t exactly sure what “position description for life with diabetes” meant, specifically, so I took it as a “job description” of sorts … and one that would vary for everyone:

Looking back, I’m grateful that my learning curve belonged mostly to my parents (which is good because I’m sure it was steep at the outset). Once I was ready to take over the responsibility of diabetes self-care, the disease was embedded solidly into the context of my life and the learning curve became more of a gentle, but constant, slope.

Reading the diverse responses from my fellow PWD on #dsma was an eye-opening experience. That’s what brings me back to #dsma every time, because there’s no set-and-standard answer to any diabetes-related query … we’re all unique and special pancreatically-challenged snowflakes. :)

Jamie summed it up neatly:

To join the diabetes conversation, watch the #dsma hashtag on Twitter on Wednesday nights at 9 pm EST. It’s a great way to wind down your night while building up our community.

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