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Posts tagged ‘type 1 diabetes’

Drafting Off #DSMA: Diabetes Job Description.

I love tuning in to the diabetes discussions on Twitter – they are always insightful and make me see things through a different (insulin-colored?) lens. The final question of last night’s #dsma chat really brought out some interesting responses:

I wasn’t exactly sure what “position description for life with diabetes” meant, specifically, so I took it as a “job description” of sorts … and one that would vary for everyone:

Looking back, I’m grateful that my learning curve belonged mostly to my parents (which is good because I’m sure it was steep at the outset). Once I was ready to take over the responsibility of diabetes self-care, the disease was embedded solidly into the context of my life and the learning curve became more of a gentle, but constant, slope.

Reading the diverse responses from my fellow PWD on #dsma was an eye-opening experience. That’s what brings me back to #dsma every time, because there’s no set-and-standard answer to any diabetes-related query … we’re all unique and special pancreatically-challenged snowflakes. :)

Jamie summed it up neatly:

To join the diabetes conversation, watch the #dsma hashtag on Twitter on Wednesday nights at 9 pm EST. It’s a great way to wind down your night while building up our community.

Whoa! Woe.

First this:

Then this:

So whoa!  Much woe.

BOLUS: Beware Of Loose, Unsupervised Snacks.

I graze.  I’m a grazer.  Visually speaking, my food choices are spread out over a gigantic field and I run through, grabbing bites here and there and never properly taking amounts or serving sizes into account.

“How many grapes did I just eat,” is a common, whispered question.  “Did I bolus for that protein bar?” is another one.  “Hey, I only had eggs and not toast – how many carbs did I bolus for, and what needs to be consumed now so I don’t hit the deck?”

I am good at going through the motions of diabetes management, but I have been slacking on minding the minutiae of late.  I don’t sit down to formal meals throughout the day (schedules are nonexistent at the moment), so keeping track of the food I’m eating has been a challenge.  Grazing makes for dodgy carb counting.

I need to mind my B.O.L.U.S:

Must Beware of Loose, Unsupervised Snacks!  When carbs are roaming around unsupervised and unbolused-for (terrible grammar, worse when spellcheck changes it to “unbloused-for”), blood sugars go high and stay there because I’m chasing my insulin-tail or I go low because I’m over-estimating.  Insulin is potent stuff, and SWAG’ing it makes for Ms and Ws on my Dexcom graph.  If I can just pay-the-fuck-attention to what I’m eating, I’ll have fewer frustrating results.  Right? RIGHT??

The more I mind what I’m eating, the more even my blood sugars will be.

Now let’s see how that theory shakes out, as I attempt it for the 10,000th time since diagnosis.

Gluten-Free Pizza Crust for the Epically Lazy.

[Insert whole paragraph about how I hate to cook/am bad at cooking/have no interest in cooking/would rather paint the deck.]

I don’t normally do anything resembling a “food review” because that’s not my bag (baby).  But I’m lazy when it comes to preparing food, so if I stumble across something that makes being a lazy chef even easier, well then hot diggity damn I am going to post about it.

BEHOLD!!  It’s a generic, “Acme Pizza” looking box, but the contents are wonderful.  This is gluten-free pizza crust and it’s legitimately delicious.  Kinnikinnick, your tagline is accurate.

I can’t say the name of it out loud without feeling like I’m casting a spell, but this pizza crust is worth writing about because it crisps up nicely, is thick enough to hold a pile of toppings, and when you bite into it, you don’t wish it was something else.  Birdy and I have experimented with several gluten-free dough options (not because of celiac, but due to preference) and this Kinnikinnick pre-made pizza crust has been the best one we’ve found so far.

“This pizza is good, Mom!”

I agreed.

[This is not an advertisement, or a sponsored post.  This post is the result of going to Whole Foods, spending eight billion dollars, and for once not regretting it.  Again, friends share.  So I'm sharing.  :) ]

The Dexcom / Mac Dance.

Sharing, because that’s what friends do.

Brian Bosh, living with type 1 diabetes and also apparently a very clever guy, found a workaround for uploading Dexcom G4 data to a Mac computer. Yes, you read that correctly.

“I created Chromadex because I was trying #DIYPS but hated carrying around a second phone. I figured I was close enough to a computer enough of the time that I could run an uploader on there and it would work well enough. There already is an uploader for Windows and Android, but no way to do it on the Mac. (Or Linux for that matter.) Once the uploader was built, though, I thought it really ought to do some of the same things Dexcom Studio did, since that’s not available on Mac either: If I had the data, I might as well offer their reports too. At this point it will upload to #DIYPS, NightScout and run three reports. It still takes a little bit of wrenching to get it to upload and I’d like to make that easier. Had a few people ask if I could make it work with MMOL. I’d like to get more reports working.”

I haven’t downloaded my data yet via this application, but others have:

If you want to try it for yourself, visit the Chrome web store and download Chromadex for free. And if you like how it works, please thank Brian.

#wearenotwaiting

Looking Back: Crabs are Evil.

I’ve always struggled with the right amount of carbs for my day-to-day diabetes management (that sounds so formal, as if I plot this stuff on a spreadsheet, which I do not) and overall, my blood sugar roller coaster is less intense when my carbs are minimal (or deeply imbedded into exercise).  Today, I’m looking back at a post from 2010 about carbs, the perils of spellcheck, and finding what works for you.

*   *   *

Crabs are something that people with diabetes are constantly grappling with.  Are crabs good for us?  Should we be avoiding crabs at all costs?  If we have too many crabs in our diet, will our A1c go up?  What’s the official recommendation for diabetics as it pertains to crabs?  Has anyone ever really tamed the wild crabs?  Is anyone eating crabs, right now, as they read this?

(Note:  Spellcheck is my nemesis right now.  It always, always wants to change “carbs” to “crabs.”  As though I have anything against Sebastian and his little sea friends.  Spellcheck also likes changing “bolusing” to “blousing,” as if wearing a puffy shirt is a verb.  For the record, I have nothing against crabs.  Crabs are fine.  And, in my opinion, carbs are fine, too.  Spellcheck is a bit of a bitch, though.  /digression)  

In all seriousness (sort of), I’ve been told, time and time again, that carbs are evil.  That if I maintain a diet that’s reasonably low-carb, my diabetes will thank me for it.  But I don’t think that carbohydrates are the enemy.  In fact, they’re my best molecular friend when my blood sugar is hanging out in the trenches.  (See also:  Reese’s)

But.

I did notice, as I was gearing up for my wedding and working out more than usual, that my very low carb diet and my consistent exercise regimen made for minimal spikes in my blood sugar.  It wasn’t a perfect system, but subbing in vegetables for mashed potatoes at dinner time made for a post-prandial under 200 mg/dl, which (pre-BSparl), was a solid goal for me.  Granted, I didn’t avoid carbs all the time, but I actively avoided high carb diet choices because I knew both my weight and my A1c would pay the price somehow.  And now, post-BSparl, I’m trying to go back to that lower carb lifestyle, because that helped keep me at a weight I was more comfortable with.  (Not that I’m actively avoiding carbs now, thanks to the epic breastfeeding lows that crop up every few hours, so I’m giving myself a big ol’ bell curve on getting back into shape.)

For me, part of the carbohydrate conundrum is user error.  Pre-Bsparl, I was a bit of a lazy boluser.  I never bolused well in advance of a meal, and my post-prandials (and my overall A1C) definitely paid the price over and over again.  It seems that I need to get my insulin pushed through my system at least 25 minutes before I sit down to eat, not five minutes before.  I learned this lesson (23 years too late, eh?) while I planning for baby, and during the course of the pregnancy, it was definitely the case.  Bolusing well before the meal worked better for me.

To each diabetic their own, I think, when it comes to carbohydrate intake.  Some people are able to manage high piles of carbs without the messy spikes.  Other people, like me, might be clumsy with their insulin.  Or sometimes the decision not to carb has nothing to do with diabetes (as in my case, and in the case of my husband) – we go lower carb for weight management reasons.  But there’s no set magical diabetes diet that cures all that ails ya.  Eating carbs, or not eating carbs, is a personal decision that each individual diabetic needs to figure out for themselves.

In the Sparling house, we tend to avoid the carbs.

And we also arm ourselves against the crabs.  Because seriously, you never know.

Friday Six: But Not On Friday.

SUM stuff from around the Internet:

“The latest in this trend is the meme showing a fat little girl titled ‘Lil Diabeetus snacks’ as a take-off to Little Debbie Snacks.  It’s being bandied about on FaceBook as ‘cute’ and ‘funny’; an appropriate name change.  Is it funny?  I don’t think so.”  Kate weighs in on the Facebook meme.

Tuesday’s #dblogcheck was a community success, and seems to have woken up many of the sleeping bears (if you want to picture blog commenters as sleeping bears, which I do, because that’s adorable).  Check out Chris Snider’s excellet Storify recap of many of the blog posts and be sure to say hello on some new and old blog favorites.

Wendy’s daughter has gone to Clara Barton Camp … and she’s also gone BIONIC.

Athletes inspire kids with diabetes at Friends for Life Conference” is the title of this video, but I’m going to assert that adults are pretty inspired by Charlie and Jay, too.

An eighth grader took She Still Smiles and made it into something really, really cool.  Read about Talia’s project here.

“Her former team dismissed her for having diabetes. Her coach and teammates stood by her and struck out on their own.”  Read more about Rebecca Young here, and consider supporting her!

I sent emails to my representatives.  Now it’s your turn.

The “Fakeabetes” Challenge – pretending to be a PWD for the day!  Read more from Kim and Whitney on this day with diabetes.

This post from Meri is a call-to-arms, and I’m ready.  “The Movement Has Begun.”

JDRF appoints Derek Rapp as new President & CEO – here’s more information on this change in leadership from the mothership itself, and a post about the changing leadership of ADA and JDRF on Diabetes Mine.

Why Should Diabetes Advocates Enter This Food Fight?”  Hope Warshaw explains.

“ADA and others have sent in their comments, but the FDA needs to hear our individual voices as advocates.”  You can give the FDA your thoughts on the proposed Nutrition Fact Label, and you have until August 1st to do so.  More on the how, and why, at Diabetes Advocates.

The FDA will host an online conversation (“A Virtual Town Hall”) for people with diabetes on November 3.  And, according to the crew at diaTribe, they want to hear from you!  Click this link for more information and the link to email diaTribe, and you can also join the conversation on Twitter using the #DOCasksFDA hashtag.

My favorite part of this video?  “I can read.”  Love, love, love.

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