Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Twitter’

To A Crisp.

The folks at Diabetes Daily have cobbled together a day to discuss diabetes social media burnout.  (Yes, ironic to dedicate a day of online discussion about diabetes social media burnout …) but the topic is real and something that we have all encountered over the years, so it bears discussion.

Only I’m not talking about it today.

Why?  Because I don’t really feel up to it.

The crap that I have to do to stay on top of diabetes is non-negotiable.  Checking blood sugars, making careful food choices, exercising, blah, blah, blaaaaah.  That stuff is part of the repertoire I cannot ignore without putting my health at significant risk.

But the blogging partTwitterInstagram?  Answering emails?  That’s not required for diabetes management.  That’s auxiliary.  And mostly positive, in my experiences.  The Internet isn’t always the cuddliest place, but in the diabetes community there is a welcomed trend of positive interactions and real, substantial relationships with people touched by diabetes coming together to share experiences, ideas, and to help someone carry the parts of diabetes that get a little heavy at times.

But these connections are not required.  They are a choice you can make, just like opening your computer or clicking away on your smartphone.  More choices follow from there, steeped in personal preferences:  Download the Facebook app on your phone?  Only use Twitter during #dsma?  Take weekends off from social media?  Engage with trolls?  Engage in supportive interactions and fruitful friendships?  Give a shit about cruel things that people might say?  Ignore/block/delete unwanted commentary?  Seek out local, in-person meet-ups?  Have long text message threads with friends you’ve made in the DOC?  Dedicate your personal and professional life to diabetes efforts?

… or how about take a breath?  Enjoy a combination of what’s available.  Relax a little bit.  Enjoy social media as an option, not as a requirement.  The Diabetes Online Community is a tool in our diabetes management toolbox.  And just like with any toolbox, you don’t always need the same one.  (Avoid trying to use a flat head when you need a Phillips.  Don’t use a hammer when you need a steamroller.  Learn the difference between a level and a wrench.  Never substitute playdough for a nail.  Don’t chew on a socketwrench.  Et cetera.)

For more on diabetes burnout with a side of social media, check out these posts:

Slightly Charred

Show Me Your Pump … Or Not


Talking About Diabetes Burnout

Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!



What Are You Advocating For?

A discussion from Masterlab at Friends for Life:

Some answers:

My answer:

What’s yours?

Urgency – #Vote4DM and #DOCasksFDA.

Today is the last day to participate in the #DOCasksFDA survey.  The link is HERE and you can just CLICK ON THIS LINK and I’ll stop using the caps lock key.

Also, if you’d like to contribute your voice and share your dream for the future of diabetes, do it.  Do it via video, if you’re so inclined, like so many others have done.

Also, the Strip Safely team is bringing about a new advocacy initiative, using Twitter to target our legislators.  As the campaign tagline says, “We voted them into office.  Tell them to #Vote4DM.”  There are three diabetes bills that are currently in play up on Capitol Hill, and by visiting the Twitter page for Strip Safely, you’ll see some customized messaging all ready to go for your specific representatives.  For more information on the bills on tap and how you can raise your voice, CLICK HERE (damn it – that all caps button is my best friend these days).

Thank you, as always, for being such a crucial part of the diabetes community.  This whole thing would fall flat without you.  (SERIOUSLY.)

What Does the DOC Mean to You?

Two weeks ago, the #dsma chat was centered on the how and why of people’s participation in the Diabetes Online Community (DOC), and after chat participants shared what brought them to the web for diabetes information, the last question of the night asked them what the DOC means to them.

The answers created a quilt of community and comfort that can’t be denied:

And for me?

Tune in to tonight’s #dsma chat at 9 pm EST. For information on how to get started with Twitter, jump back to this Diabetes and Twitter 101 post.

Drafting Off #DSMA: Diabetes Job Description.

I love tuning in to the diabetes discussions on Twitter – they are always insightful and make me see things through a different (insulin-colored?) lens. The final question of last night’s #dsma chat really brought out some interesting responses:

I wasn’t exactly sure what “position description for life with diabetes” meant, specifically, so I took it as a “job description” of sorts … and one that would vary for everyone:

Looking back, I’m grateful that my learning curve belonged mostly to my parents (which is good because I’m sure it was steep at the outset). Once I was ready to take over the responsibility of diabetes self-care, the disease was embedded solidly into the context of my life and the learning curve became more of a gentle, but constant, slope.

Reading the diverse responses from my fellow PWD on #dsma was an eye-opening experience. That’s what brings me back to #dsma every time, because there’s no set-and-standard answer to any diabetes-related query … we’re all unique and special pancreatically-challenged snowflakes. :)

Jamie summed it up neatly:

To join the diabetes conversation, watch the #dsma hashtag on Twitter on Wednesday nights at 9 pm EST. It’s a great way to wind down your night while building up our community.

Advocacy: Do It with Flair.

From @sixuntilme, after watching some of DarthSkeptic’s Tweets correcting diabetes misinformation fly by in my feed (thanks to @txtingmypancreas for highlighting):  “Why did you decide to take this wickedly funny high road?”

From @darthskeptic:  “It was partially based on frustration and partially based on ‘TheoryFail’ and ‘TakeThatDarwin‘ addressing and mocking people ignorant about basic science.”

Whatever the reason, I love seeing people who are tagging their desserts as #diabetes on Twitter being served up some education by @darthskeptic. Some examples:

And my favorite:

Carry on, @darthskeptic. Carry on.

Tallygear Giveaway! Exclamation Point!

Tallygear is awesome, and I’ve been a big fan for many years.  After switching over to the Dexcom G4 continuous glucose monitor, I was so happy to see that Donna at Tallygear had created a case to protect the G4 (and have been using it daily since).  And now she’s up and running with a lot of new cases for the Dexcom G4 unit, as well as some other colorful ways to dress up the otherwise drab world of diabetes devices.

Check out some of her new designs!

Donna was kind enough to send some samples to me, and I’d like to turn that favor around to you guys.  But there’s a catch.  I have three Tallygear “gift packs” (in quotation marks because there are things from Tallygear that I’m including, but I’m sending the packages myself, so there will be some additional surprises to be determined by how much cat hair I can collect from Loopy and Siah … just kidding … sort of …) to give away, but I want to couple this up with the recent, and important, discussions about diabetes stigma.

To win one the Tallygear giveaways, you’ll need to leave a comment here on this blog post or Tweet about this giveaway (see the Rafflecopter widget below), but not in the “promote me!” sort of way.  Instead, I want you to answer this question:

“How will you help change the perception of diabetes today?  #dstigma“ 

As a community, we can help change the face of diabetes, one moment at a time.  Dealing with diabetes-related stigma isn’t something that can be “fixed” overnight, but every time we make diabetes visible in an accurate, educated way, we’re taking a bite out of stigma.  Kind of like McGruff the Crime Dog.  So let’s keep talking.

You can follow Donna from Tallygear on Twitter @Tallygear and on Facebook.  The official Tallygear website, with a complete product listing and a catalog of colors to choose from, is at  If you’re one of the winners, I’ll contact you for your mailing address (so be sure to leave a valid email).

And thanks for playing along.  I’m excited to see the discussions that have cropped up about diabetes stigma, and I hope to contribute to them.

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers