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Posts tagged ‘#sparearose’

Lucky.

Low blood sugars have become moments that scare me more now than they did when I was younger, mostly because the symptoms of my lows have all but disappeared until I’m deep into the 40’s. It’s shocking to my system to have that gentle lag and foggy confusion suddenly open into the abyss of a properly symptomatic low, bringing about the sweat and shaking, confusion and disorientation.

But lately, I’ve been thinking about how lucky I am to have the ability to go low. Hear me out on this … it makes sense in the long run.

During the course of any given day, I’m able to deliver a basal rate of insulin that keeps my blood sugars under control, and I can take a bolus of insulin to cover any meals I’m eating. I have the option to correct a blood sugar of 140 mg/dL back down to 100 mg/dL with precision dosing from an insulin pump, insulin pen, or even a syringe. I can micro-manage my blood sugars throughout the day in efforts to achieve an A1C and time-in-range that gives me the best chance of good health for a long time.

It’s not a question of “will I or won’t I get insulin today?” My biggest worry is how in-range my numbers have been. Diabetes, no matter where you live, is not a pleasant disease, but in a country where my access to insulin is not a panic point, I realize how lucky I am.

And I know what I can do to help those who aren’t as lucky.

Yes, more of this Spare a Rose stuff.  But you guys. It takes just a minute to make a donation to Spare a Rose, benefiting Life for a Child. Hang on … I just did it.

I made good on my promise to donate a rose for yesterday’s Super Bowl game (during which I paid little attention to the game itself and was a bit more confused by how many babies truly are credited back to Super Bowl shaggings). A five dollar donation is one full month of life for a child with diabetes in a developing country.

Can you spare one rose today?

 

It’s All About That Rose, That Rose … So Spare It.

Today, people will be watching a football game and cheering on their favorite team (and my mother will be in a sports fan version of mourning because the Patriots are not playing).  I want to remind you that it’s all fun and Big Games until someone loses an islet.

(Yes, another diabetes post.  On a diabetes blog!  Go figure.)

Even though the Superbowl is today, my eye is still on the Spare a Rose prize.  Please throw some support towards the Spare a Rose campaign.  With this one, we can all win big.

For a little extra fun, join the discussion on Facebook about Team Game or Team Commercials, pick a team, and donate an extra rose if your team “wins.”  Or loses.  Either way, it will be a nice change to pace to watch a pile of people battling on Facebook about something other than politics.

Spare a Rose 2016

From February 1 – 14, the diabetes online community is hosting our annual Spare A Rose campaign.  You remember that one, right?  The one where you send eleven roses instead of twelve on Valentine’s Day, taking the value of that saved rose (averaged out to $5) and donating that to the International Diabetes Federation’s Life for a Child program, which provides life-saving insulin and resources for children with diabetes in developing countries.

We need you.

Yes, you.

You’re part of this, you know.  If you’re reading these words, or any words written by a person touched by diabetes, you are touched by diabetes.  Maybe you’re the parent of a child with diabetes.  Maybe you’re an app developer looking to connect with the diabetes community.  Maybe you run a magazine that hosts health-related articles.  Maybe you’re a PR company that hopes to influence the diabetes community.  Maybe you’re a representative from a diabetes company, or a teacher who has a student with diabetes in their class, or a researcher who studies this disease.

We need you to help amplify the Spare a Rose message.  You can donate to the charity, share the Spare A Rose link with your friends and colleagues, and truly take this initiative, this passion – and our global community –  to a powerful new level.

If you’ve emailed a diabetes advocate, asking them to share your latest press release or to engage in your survey, please spare a rose.

If you work in the diabetes industry and you leave diabetes in your office when you go home at night, remember that people with diabetes don’t ever leave diabetes behind.  And that many people with diabetes struggle to gain access to the drug that keeps them alive.  Considering bringing this campaign to your office.  Please spare a rose.

If you are touched by diabetes in any way – the partner of, the friend of, the coworker of, the child of, the parent of, the neighbor of a person with diabetes – please spare a rose.

If you are part of the greater patient community, I’m asking you to walk with the diabetes community for two weeks and help us make a difference in the life of a child.  With your raised voices, we make a greater difference.  Please spare a rose.

This is where we shine, you guys; where we take care of our own.  Where we can take our collective power, not as people with picky pancreases but instead as people with full and grateful hearts.  Show your love for this community on Valentine’s Day by sending one less rose to a loved one and instead providing life for a child.

Flowers die.  Children shouldn’t.

Please spare a rose.

And please spread the word!

 

(This post is recycled, but the sentiment remains the same and the mission is just as important.  Show true love.  Save a child.)

Guest Post: #SpareARose and Symplur.

I’m late with today’s post, but it’s a good one.  🙂  This afternoon, Chris Snider of A Consequence of Hypoglycemia has contributed a guest post about Symplur and the Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign.  It’s an in-depth look at how the stats of the #sparearose hashtag campaign influenced the spread of the message.  This post is an interesting peek at where analytics and community passion line up, and where they don’t.  Thanks, Chris, for offering your insight!

*   *   *

I started working with the folks at Symplur at the beginning of this year. My objective was to tell stories and bring the patient community further into the conversation around data – specifically the data they are generating through health conversations on Twitter. After the Spare a Rose campaign concluded, I reached out to Kerri to see if I could help shine a light on the 2-week whirlwind using Symplur’s fancy analytics tool, Signals. I was given four questions to try to address.

1. How did the message spread? Did it reach outside of people with “diabetes” in their profile?
2. What kinds of messages resonated on the whole? Calls to donate, stories about why insulin matters, etc?
3. Did people with small reach still have a big impact because of the close knit nature of the DOC?
4. Can the data prove that every voice does matter?

(1.) What the data says: people associating themselves with diabetes in their screen name, user name, or description represented 43.9% (321) of #sparearose participants, but generated 63.5% (5,825,580) of the impressions. What is difficult to report on is how many of these impressions overlap within the community. How many followers do each of the 43.9% have that are associated with diabetes in one form or another? How many impressions from the other 56.1% were made on people living with or associated by diabetes? It’s difficult to truly parse out where the venn diagram sits, but I think it’s safe to say the diabetes community came strong with their effort to spread the word. This does leave me with some bigger questions to consider for 2016: How might we increase the number of people sharing #sparearose that aren’t immediately associated with diabetes? Should that ratio always favor the diabetes community? How might the appeal of Spare a Rose better resonate with people without diabetes?

(2.) I tried to see what kind of activity was generated around tweets featuring the word ‘donate’ and ‘insulin’ as those are the two biggest subjects related to the Spare a Rose campaign. Every tweet including the word donate included a link to sparearose.org or the subsequent donation page. Similarly, 93% of links including the word insulin included a link to one of those two pages. It makes sense, right? If we’re going to ask people to donate, we need to show them where to go. If we’re going to appeal to the life-saving insulin #sparearose provides, we need to include a link to show people where to go. Looking past the percentages, however, reveals something quite curious. There were over twice as many (2.3x) tweets featuring the word insulin as there were the word donate. What would the final fundraising totals look like if more tweets mentioned the fact that one of the goals of #sparearose is to collect donations? Something to think about, perhaps.

One other stat I noticed was that of all the #sparearose tweets, 67% of the ones that were recorded were Retweets. I wonder what this data would show if more communication about #sparearose was original thought rather than rebroadcasting the words of someone else. To be fair, I’m just as guilty of this as the next person. Sometimes someone else does a better job of saying what I wanted to say and rather than repurpose someone else’s thoughts and words, a simple RT is enough to get the point across.

(3.) To address this, I tried to determine what maximum follower count yielded half of the total impressions from the reporting period. And, what maximum follower count yielded half of the tweets. Where is the tipping point in the makeup of participants that best represents how much of an influence a smaller following can generate. My impressions goal was 3,536,645. Tweets was 868.

Of all the people participating in #sparearose on Twitter, participants with 19,150 or fewer followers generated a little over half of the impressions recorded – How many participants have fewer than 19,150 followers? 97%. 19,000 twitter followers isn’t realistic for most of us, so to put all of this in perspective, participants with 1,000 or fewer followers generated 3% of the total impressions recorded. A single tweet from Crystal Bowersox makes a huge difference in terms of exposure.

Of all the people participating in #sparearose on Twitter, participants with 945 or fewer followers sent a little over half of the tweets during the reporting period. So, most of the tweets came from people with less than 945 followers, but they generated less than 3% of the impressions? My thoughts on this lead into the final question.

(4.) Do small voices matter? Unfortunately I can’t report on how many links were clicked, whose tweets generated the most clicks to sparearose.org. Crystal Bowersox understands the value of a vial of insulin, but do her 60,000 followers? But, for someone with 150 followers, how many of them are going to acknowledge and engage with a donation ask? It feels cold making all of this a numbers game, but the numbers fascinate me. Is there a point where you have too many followers to trust that any significant percentage will engage with a fundraising ask? How likely will followers outside of the diabetes community donate? Should we, all of us, try to cultivate a following outside of the diabetes community in addition to the relationships we build up among the pancreatically-challenged? Is it a matter of making the right ask or the right number of asks?

So we’re clear, I don’t think it’s the responsibility of the entire diabetes community to think about the nuts and bolts of how all this works. What matters most is the passion to connect with others and help educate whoever will listen to the reality that a little can mean a lot to a child with diabetes. Thanks to people like Kerri, we can make a difference. Even if the numbers from Symplur may suggest otherwise, believe me when I tell you that every voice does matter. Every one of you reading this, telling your story, paving the way for someone else with diabetes to feel safe enough to join our crazy little group, all of us are making a difference.

Stream of Consciousness.

Time for a bullet list of purged thoughts, brought to you by the bottom of my coffee pot.

  • It’s not snowing.  I don’t usually have a rage response to winter, but this one has been more than we could properly manage.  (Like when our snow shovel broke under the weight of the drift we were shoveling through.  Or when our snow blower ran out of gas and the gas was in the shed out back and we couldn’t get to the shed because the show was up past our hips.  #fuckyousnow and I mean it.)  So for it to be #notsnowing and #melting is a good thing.
  • Get these hashtags off my blog. #nottwitter
  • For a solid five year period, I did not lose a single pair of gloves.  If one fell out of the car when I opened the door, I saw it immediately.  If I dropped one, it always managed to fall into my bag and not end up lost forever.  Gloves were among the most lose-able things in my wardrobe and yet they always managed to stay paired up and on hand (literally).  But this year, something happened to my glove mojo and I’ve lost four pairs this winter alone.  I don’t know how to recover my good glove karma.
  • I have bought the same pair of moonstone stud earrings a dozen different times, and yet I still only have two singular earrings.  It’s unnerving.  Do these cheap little earrings go where the gloves go?
  • This weekend, I’ll be at the Diabetes UnConference in Las Vegas, where there isn’t any snow and there are many PWD on tap to attend.  I’m looking forward to making new friends, seeing old ones, and bolusing for copious amounts of iced coffee.
  • Way to GO, mySugr!!!
  • Does emotional stress spike up your blood sugar?  Caroline dives in to find out.  (But the answer is yes.  A firm and confidence yes.)
  • Did you guys see that the Spare a Rose totals have been boosted, thanks to a donation program from Asante426 lives saved, thanks to all of you.
  • Thanks to #dblogcheck day, I found some gluten-free lemon bars on this blog.  And now I love this blog.
  • At the Rhode Island JDRF TypOneNation event last weekend, I heard about a new sort of barrier tape to put underneath my Dexcom sensors to help mitigate the wicked rash.  It’s called Mepitac tape and I bought my first roll off of Amazon this morning.  I have no idea if it will work better/worse than the J&J Toughpads I have been using for the last three years, but I’ll try anything to keep the itch at bay.  Will report back after I give it a go.
  • Ripped from DHF’s site:  “The Diabetes Hands Foundation is happy and excited to offer scholarships to diabetes conferences as a part of the Diabetes Advocates program. We offer these scholarships to help get advocates to the major conferences in the US so the patient voice is present.”  You can find out more about the scholarships here, and then you should APPLY because your voice MATTERS.  All caps and such.
  • My friend Jenni Prokopy (the ChronicBabe) kicks ass, and I want her to continue to kick ass.  Check out her kick(ass)starter here.
  • I keep circling back to this David Sedaris essay about his FitBit because I am in a hardcore week of competition with an equally-competitive friend on FitBit, and I’m afraid I may wear holes in the soles of my soul in efforts to win.
  • But as I write this, I’m already itching to get up and clock a few miles on the treadmill in an attempt to gain some ground before traveling this afternoon.
  • In related news, I am relentlessly competitive.
  • And with that, I need to go run.
  • While I’m gone, the cats will guard the door like little, furry sentinels.

Guards.

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

 

 

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