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Posts tagged ‘pumping insulin’

Pockets.

I’ve been wearing an insulin pump since 2004 and even though I take pump vacations or go untethered every now and again, I prefer pumping over injections because it’s just EASIER to avoid high blood sugars if I’m wearing a pump.

Yep.  That’s my jam.  It’s not the basal rate programming that I can do (although that’s a nice plus) and it’s not the carbohydrate calculations that my pump can whiz through (although that’s a nice plus, too) and it’s not even the fact that I can be super discreet when taking my insulin (a welcomed departure from going full Science Guy at the dinner table) … it’s the ease of correcting highs.

With injections, I cannot be bothered to draw up 0.3u of insulin to correct a 155 mg/dL back down to 100 mg/dL.  For some reason, that doesn’t seem “worth it.”  But on the pump, I’ll ding in those little doses to keep myself streamlined, and my A1C thanks me for it.

So diabetes reasons win when it comes to pumping. But sometimes getting dressed is a pain in the ass, making mashing up my wardrobe with my diabetes devices a  challenge.  Insulin pump squirreled away in my bra as a disco boob is not optimal all the time.  And dresses don’t present a lot of options outside of the bra …

Unless.  The dress.  HAS POCKETS.

I love dresses.  Love, love, love.  They are comfortable and not too sweaty gross and they are just lovely.  Love them.  And when the dress has a pocket, you can snip a little hole right in the top of the pocket, lace your pump tubing through the hole, and nest your pump safely and soundly into the pocket pouch.

Like these *:

  1. Women’s Lace Yoke Striped Knit Swing Dress
  2. Frondescent Fete A-Line Dress in Dusk Thicket
  3. Renewed Resplendence A-Line Dress in Ocean
  4. One-Shoulder Ponte Fit-and-Flare Dress
  5. Vila Shift Dress With Pockets
  6. Linen fit and flare dress
  7. Short-sleeved Jersey Dress
  8. Knee-length Dress
  9. Women’s Soybu Sleeveless Surplice Dress
  10. Pack Everywhere Dress

It’s kangarooing your pancreas, without going full marsupial.  And I am a fan.

(* And none of these links are affiliate links.  They are just links to the dresses because POCKETS and PUMPS and those two things should be teammates for sure.  Ooh, and here are 33 [larry bird] more dresses that have pockets.)

Blood Sugar Turbulence.

“The captain has the seatbelt sign on.  Please stay in your seats until the seatbelt sign is turned off.  This is for your safety.”

The flight attendants were also in their seats, having suspended drink service.

Turbulence sucks, but it passes quickly … usually.  Unfortunately, on this flight it seemed like it was going to be a 20 – 30 minute wigglefest for the plane.  And also unfortunately, we were at 38,000 feet and my blood sugars appeared to be making the same climb.

I’ve noticed, especially since my pregnancy last year, that I need to change my infusion set at the three day mark, or my absorption goes full crumb (climbing blood sugars, sticky highs).  I was traveling home from the TCOYD ONE conference in San Diego (awesome event –  more on that conference tomorrow) and my “it’s been three days – change your site!” alarm went off the day before.  I was on borrowed time, infusion-set wise.

I meant to change it at the airport but time was too tight.  And I had no intentions of changing it at my airplane seat, but my blood sugars were high, seemingly stuck there, and I needed to swap out that site ASAP.  Who know how long the air was going to be rough, and I could already see that my blood sugars were in garbage mode. So, tucked against the window and using my scarf as a barrier between me and my seatmates, I was able to quietly change out my site.

Covert site change on the plane. #insulincognito #latergram

A post shared by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

And yes, the beeps are usually loud an intrusive but the speaker for the X2 is on the backside of the pump – that series of little holes – so keeping my hand firmly over that part made for a subtle set change.  Shrugged my shoulder out of my shirt and popped the infusion set on the back of my arm and I was good to go without even a side-eyed glance from my seat mates.

Stealth set changes at 38,000 feet without going into the nasty little airplane bathroom? And blood sugars that started coming down within 20 minutes of the set change? Check and check. See ya, blood sugar turbulence.

That Clip, Though.

I’ve been using the t:slim pump for the better part of a year now, and over the last few months (here’s a handy disclosure that you should read for context on my relationship with Tandem), I’ve appreciated the new set of options that the t:slim has brought into my diabetes life.

… man, that sounds a little formal.  I’m too pregnant for formality at the moment.  (My feet have officially given up on being feet and refuse any covering other than socks or flip flops, and my son is moving visibly as I type, making sitting close to my desk a challenge. Eff formality.)  The reasons for the t:slim being a badass addition to my diabetes management RIGHT THIS SECOND are that I can take a bolus in a matter of seconds without scrolling through fifty different screens, I can edit my basal or insulin:carb needs with a few beeps, and the 300 unit reservoir is going to come in handy these last few weeks of pregnancy.

One challenge I’ve historically had with the t:slim pump, however, is the clip that is shipped out with it.  For me, the clip was a little bulkier than I preferred and also not as secure as I needed.  I wanted streamlined and secure, and as my pregnant body expands and clothing options like “pockets” and “waistbands” have been shoved into the distance.  I need my pump clip to be able to hang on by a thread.

This one works great, though:

I love this clip. #tslim #diabetes #insulinpump

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

A friend suggested this clip to me and gave me one of theirs, but since trying it out, I’ve keep a spare or two on hand because it seriously solves all of my pump clip troubles.  The tape is very secure and I’ve had the same pump clip stay successfully stuck for the last six months.  I have no relationship with the company who makes the clip, and this is not an affiliate link or anything like that, but if you want to try out a pump clip for your t:slim (or any other pump) that is subtle, streamlined, and strong, this Nite Ize Hip Clip is worth a shot.

Hey! An informative post! Who saw that coming? Not me. Bring on the cat gifs.

cat filing his nails

“Do You Like It?”

“Excuse me … your, um, arm?  What’s that on your arm?”

Ninety-five percent of the time, I don’t care if people ask about my insulin pump or CGM.  More power to them for being bold enough to embrace the awkwardness and actually ask, instead of assuming.  (And even in the 5% moments of “argh – stop looking, don’t ask,” it usually ends up being a moment of discussion and disclosure I’m grateful for.  I should be more open to discussing diabetes in a public setting.  Hang on a second … let me start a blog real quick.)

“On my arm?  That’s my insulin pump.  I have diabetes.”

I was in line at Starbucks, grabbing an iced coffee (under the gestational lock and key of decaf for just a few more weeks), escaping the blazing summer temperatures for a few minutes before heading back to work.  I was wearing a skirt and a tank top, with my infusion set connected to the back of my right arm.  My body – thanks to third trimester expansion, has run out of subtle places to stash my insulin pump, so it was casually clipped to the strap of my tank top.

Kind of noticeable, but in a “who cares” sort of way.  It’s hot outside.  And I’m wicked pregnant.  And I have no waist anymore.  You can see my insulin pump?  Good for you.  You can probably see my belly button, too.

“No kidding.  Diabetes?  Is it because of the pregnancy?”

“No, I’ve had diabetes way longer than this pregnancy.  I was diagnosed when I was seven.”

The guy paused for a second, his eyes lingering on the infusion set on my arm.  “So you do that thing instead of shots?”

“Yep.”

“Do you like it?”

That question always throws me a little.  Do I like it?  The pump?  I do like the pump.  I like not taking injections.  I like not whipping out syringes at the dinner table and exposing my skin.  I like taking wee ickle bits of insulin to correct minor highs.  I like running temp basals to beat back hypos.  I like people wondering what it might be instead of assuming it’s a medical device.

“I do like it.  It works for me.”  I paused, already envious of the coffee in his hand.  “I like coffee more, though.”

He laughed and finished paying for his coffee.  “Can’t blame you for that.  Good luck with the baby, and try to stay cool in this weather,” he said.

I don’t like diabetes.  That’s for damn sure.  That shit is exhausting and I’m burnt out on the demands it places on my life.  But the pump?  Yes, I do like it.  It’s  a streamlined delivery mechanism for a hormone I wish my body would just cave and start making again.  It handles diabetes so I can go back to trying to put my socks on without tipping over.

Everybody Beeps.

(With deep, deep apologies to R.E.M. and Everybody Hurts)

Everybody Beeps

When your day is long
And the night, the night is yours for sleep.
When you tuck yourself in bed
For some rest … well hang on

Don’t close your tired eyes
Cause you wear a device
And everybody beeps … sometimes.

Sometimes reservoirs are low
And need to be refilled.
So you get up out of bed (set off, prime on)
Remove the older site (prime on)
You fill with what you need
For three days … well hang on

Everybody beeps
Takes comfort in the tech
Everybody beeps
Don’t throw your pump, oh no
Don’t throw your CGM
You feel like you’re alone?
No, no, no … you’re not alone.

If your islets are a mess
And you’re doing the best you can
When you think you’ve had too much
Of the beeps, well hang on

Well everybody beeps, sometimes.
But you are not alone.
Community is here.
All the time.
We’re here all the time.
All the time.

So hold on, hold on
Hold on, hold on, hold on, hold on, hold on, hold on
Everybody beeps

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