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Posts tagged ‘psychosocial health’

Participate in Research: Peds to Adult Endo Care.

As an adult with type 1 diabetes who, a hundred years ago, transitioned from pediatric care to adult care, I have a ton of interest in how that process takes place. There are so many factors that play into making that transition effective.  Does the child have a chance to talk one-on-one with their doctor as they get older?  Is there room for group visits in the pediatric space to help transition to adult care?  Is independence and responsibility tossed to the kid all at once or is it a gradual process.  And hey, does the waiting room inspire confidence in peds while the waiting room in the adult clinic generates despair?  (Oooh that last one.)

Growing up with diabetes includes learning how to take the baton of self-care and run with it, and everyone does it differently.

Always working in pursuit of improved patient outcomes, Drs. Tamara and Sean Oser, along with their colleague Dr. Kanthi Krishna, are studying the process of transition from pediatric diabetes care to adult diabetes care. I cannot wait to see what comes of this study and I hope lots of SUM readers click through to see if they qualify to participate.

tl;dr: To see if you qualify and to participate in this study about the journey from peds endo care to adult endo care, you can access their survey here:

HERE IS THE SURVEY!  CLICK ON MEEEEEEE!

Feel free to share this survey with your PWD peers so we can help improve quality of life and health outcomes for our community.  And if you’d like a psychedelic Santa gif, you can have that, too.

Diabetes Blog Week: The Other Half of Diabetes.

The Other Half of Diabetes:  We think a lot about the physical component of diabetes, but the mental component is just as significant. How does diabetes affect you or your loved one mentally or emotionally? How have you learned to deal with the mental aspect of the condition? Any tips, positive phrases, mantras, or ideas to share on getting out of a diabetes funk? (If you are a caregiver to a person with diabetes, write about yourself or your loved one or both!)

(And for more on the topics of Diabetes Blog Week 2016, click here.)

“Just don’t eat sugar.”  “Take your pills.”
“Count your carbs.”  “Avoid most thrills.
“Be prepared.” ” Plan ahead.”

But this disease
Is in my head.

I can’t split up the thoughts around
My mental health and body sound.
Impossible to draw a line
Between “I’m sick” and feeling fine.
Just take my shot?  And avoid stress?
Beware of cake?  Test, don’t guess?
The list of things disease requires
Realigns my needs around desires.

“I need juice.”
“It might cause strife.”
But sometimes juice can save my life.

It’s hard to share
How much I see.
In every test,
Mortality.

Was seven then, when it arrived.
And since that day, I’ve stayed alive.
But not because
I’ve not had pie.
Or “just took shots.”
I try.
And try.

The mental health
I have achieved,
I fight for – harder? –
Than A1C.

The demands put on a chronic life
Exceed “just take your shot.”
We live beyond, we live out loud.
Mental health not an afterthought.

It’s not a disease where you just “just.”
It’s more than simply “do.”
But how I manage mental health
Will help me make it through.

Running the Gamut of Emotions.

In my diabetes life, emotions are right up there with insulin and food as influencers of blood sugar management.  And I wish it wasn’t so, because stress and excitement are hard to “plan.”  (Replace those actual quotation marks with finger quotes, because they fit the bill a bit better.)  And the emotions that come up as a result of diabetes crap?  Holy shit, they are a circus all their own.

The emotions of diabetes are a thing for me, and one that I need to work to manage as fastidiously as I work on my numbers.  Which is why my Animas column this month is about that exact thing:

“Diabetes is more than the lab work results and pricking fingers, taking insulin, counting carbs.  That’s the to-do list we have to check every day, but it doesn’t even begin to touch the other side of life with a chronic illness, and that’s the headspace part.  Some of my academic friends call it the psychosocial part; I think of it as the emotional portion of managing my diabetes, and in my life, managing my headspace is as important as managing my blood sugars.

There’s a whole range of emotions connected to diabetes that I run though on any given day.”

For the full article, click over to my columns at Animas.  And for more on emotions and diabetes, you can basically read anything I’ve ever written here on SUM.  🙂

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