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Posts tagged ‘interviews’

Why We Revolt: An Interview with Dr. Victor Montori

The founder of the Patient Revolution is Dr. Victor Montori, a leader in the Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit at Mayo Clinic and an endocrinologist at Mayo. Dr. Montori is interested in how knowledge is produced, disseminated and taken up in practice — and how this leads to optimal health care delivery and patient outcomes.  His book, Why We Revolt, has just been published, and he’s here today to talk about the how, why, and necessity of a patient revolution.

Disclosure:  For the last few months, I’ve been proudly involved as a board member for The Patient Revolution and have contributed to some of their editorial endeavors, so I’m invested in this organization.  But not just because it’s something to do.  I’m invested, invigorated, and inspired by The Patient Revolution because the people involved are making a difference now instead of kicking the can of careful and kind care down the road.

Kerri: Victor, last time we spoke here on SixUntilMe, we talked about the evolution towards a patient revolution. Well now the Revolution has arrived. Can you tell me a little bit about the inception of the Patient Revolution?

VM: The Patient Revolution is the coincidence of two lines of thinking and doing. On the one hand, the Warburton Family Foundation whose focus is to promote better care through better patient participation in care and the KER Unit, a Mayo Clinic research group that has been working for more than a decade in advancing the science of patient-centered care. As the ideas came together, it became evident that a new nonprofit, The Patient Revolution, was necessary to advance this mission. We advocate for nonviolent action, one focused on conversations at the clinical, regional and national level to turn away from industrial healthcare and toward careful and kind care for all.

Kerri: And in the last few weeks, you’ve released your book, Why We Revolt. Why do we revolt, and what is the book about?

VM: I had to write this book now. I believe that our healthcare system has corrupted its fundamental mission and has stopped caring. This book argues that greed is a basic reason for why people sometimes get care by accident, other times the are treated with unintentional cruelty, this because of care for people like you, not care for you, you being missed. We need to turn away from such industrial healthcare and toward care that is timeless and elegant, that notices each person in high definition and treats them as one of our own by clinicians working in a system based on love and solidarity. This is why we revolt. This turning away cannot result from a bunch of incremental reforms; it needs a revolution.

Kerri: What was the writing process like?

VM: Each chapter has its own pain, its own pleasure, its own reason for being. My biggest fear in writing this book is that its content would be ridiculous, and among the chapters the two most at-risk are Love and Timelessness. To speak of love in healthcare seems so removed from the day-to-day experience of industrial healthcare and the technical orientation of much of its workforce, everyone more or less convinced that they show up to work to do a job. Yet, we must reclaim love between fellow humans as a fundamental part of the reason and the way we care for and about each other. Time stands in the way of almost any good idea about care. Lack of time is often cited as a barrier. Yet, I don’t know why we cannot imagine care that is timeless, not that each visit would have infinite duration, but where there is enough time for it to grow thick, to fly because it does not move, because we are caring or being cared.

Kerri: What section or chapter are you most proud of … or perhaps most terrified of?

VM: I am getting notes from patients, stories they want to share in which they use the words of the book. This is how i want people to feel – ready to share their stories, with stories and conversations the nonviolent tactics of this revolution. Some have re-experienced pain as the book reflected their experiences of “care” and that has given me pain. But others who I have never met have felt heard, seen. From their notes I also have learned that people have found common ground with the values and feelings I disclose in these pages. It is as if readers are forming a community with this writer and with each other. Well, this are the seminal moments of what I would hope will be an unstoppable movement for careful and kind care for all. Each of these responses have made me feel enormous gratitude, moved by their love, and overwhelming responsibility to take this further until we can surprise ourselves with our success.

Kerri: Who should be reading Why We Revolt? And why?

VM: I dedicated the book to my sons, and they are teenagers. My hope is that by the time we are finished they can take patient care for granted, and regard industrial healthcare as an aberration, a historical accident of greed. I think clinicians and patients, caregivers and policymakers, citizens and managers, but mostly young people, not yet bit by the cynicism virus, and dedicated to work for a better world, perhaps students of the helping professions. I hope this book will give them a vocabulary for the fight, and elicit the stories that make all the difference.

Thank you, Dr. Montori, for helping pave the way for conversations about careful and kind care.  For more about the Patient Revolution, visit their website.  For more about Victor’s book, you can get an overview here and buy your own copy on Amazon.  

And if you’d like to share your healthcare experience, or your perspectives as a patient or clinician, visit the Patient Revolution website and get involved.  

Bright Spots & Landmines: An Interview with Adam Brown

Adam Brown has written a new – TERRIFIC – book for the diabetes community, full of the same brilliant, actionable advice that we’ve come to happily expect from his diaTribe columns.  His book, Bright Spots & Landmines, is billed as “the diabetes guide I wish someone had handed me,” and that sentiment is absolutely correct.  This book is a powerful tool that people living with diabetes can pour through and make their own, with moments of reflection and inspiration interspersed among research, recipes, and amazing graphic design.  
Bright Spots & Landmines by Adam Brown
Kerri: What inspired you to write Bright Spots & Landmines?

Adam:  When I started writing my diaTribe column (Adam’s Corner) four years ago, I never would have guessed that more than half a million people would read it! I’ve received hundreds of emails and comments sharing gratitude and kindness, which is what motivated me to do something loftier with Bright Spots & Landmines. Each Adam’s Corner column stands alone, so I wanted this book to be a single guide that distills all the most helpful diabetes tips I’ve learned in four areas: food, mindset, exercise, and sleep.

Kerri: What makes Bright Spots & Landmines different from what’s already out there? 

Adam:  I agonized over this question before writing this book – I wanted to make sure Bright Spots & Landmines would add value!

From the beginning, I had two major goals with this project: (i) write an extremely actionable book that anyone with diabetes can use to improve some aspect of his/her life immediately; and (ii) give it away at as low of a price as possible! Based on the early reviews and the free/name-your-own-price PDF download, I’m so excited about the outcomes. A few other things come to mind:

Bright Spots & Landmines is written from a person-with-diabetes perspective and based on more than 10,000 hours writing professionally about diabetes, over 50,000 hours of personal learning from CGM, and everything I’ve taken away from hundreds of diabetes conferences and leading thinkers.

The book focuses on food, mindset, exercise, and sleep, which are not often addressed in the same actionable diabetes guide.

Bright Spots & Landmines went through an extensive feedback process, with a combined 500+ years of diabetes experience between all the reviewers – yourself included!

Last (and perhaps most important), my girlfriend, Priscilla Leung, did all the wonderful illustrations and graphics in the book – these really make the writing come to life. I’m as proud of how it looks as I am of the words!

Kerri: How do you want readers to feel after reading your book?

Adam:  Uplifted, positive, and ready to try some new things and experiment! I hope people leave Bright Spots & Landmines with tangible actions and nuggets they can use to improve their life with diabetes – whether it’s a recipe I eat, a quote I like, or an answer to question that the book poses to them.

I hope this book also reminds readers that we all have moments of enormous diabetes frustration, self-sabotaging food decisions, negative thoughts and questions, busy days where exercise is hard to fit in, and nights without enough sleep. Bright Spots & Landmines shares my toolkit for navigating the choppy, unpredictable waters of living with diabetes. I hope it puts some wind in readers’ sails.

Adam Brown, author of Bright Spots & Landmines

Kerri: Is Bright Spots & Landmines made up of rules for living well with diabetes, or are these suggestions for people to implement in their own lives?

Adam:  Awesome question! This is a book filled with things that have made an enormous difference in my life with diabetes. By sharing them, I hope readers will glean tips they can try or adapt to fit their needs.

For instance, chia pudding is one that has been fascinating to follow. Some readers make it exactly like I do and love it! Others have tinkered with the recipe to fit their needs. And for others, it’s not a fit. I expect this variance with all 43 Bright Spots and 16 Landmines in the book – some will resonate, some will need to be adapted, and some won’t apply. This is why each chapter – food, mindset, exercise, and sleep – concludes with Bright Spots & Landmines questions so readers can identify what works for them.

Kerri: Is this a book you would want to give newly diagnosed PWD? Long-timers? Caregivers? Is there something for each group in this book?

Adam:  All of the above – and I don’t say that lightly. Every one of these groups read drafts of the book. A mom of a newly diagnosed son read Bright Spots & Landmines, as did a woman with over 50 years living with diabetes. Other readers fell in between (see testimonials and Amazon reviews). I even had some people with prediabetes read the book and find it useful!

Kerri: What was your favorite part to write?

Adam:  I love the Mindset chapter most of all, even though it comes second in the book. (Of course, Food had to be first in a diabetes book.) The right Mindset is like rocket fuel for living better with diabetes – it underlies everything and can provide such a boost, even on the toughest days. This chapter shares lots of tips and tricks related to perfectionism, motivation, stress, goal setting, hacking my brain and habits, and beyond. I’m a voracious readers of psychology and self-help, which is probably why I had so much to say in this chapter.

Kerri: What was the most challenging portion of this book for you to tackle?

Adam:  I struggled a lot with the title. We went through many iterations, including “Diabetes Bright Spots & Landmines” (too long), “Solving Diabetes” (a bit too presumptuous), and the original (read: not great) title, “Make Diabetes Awesome.” Probably the worst title in the original brainstorm was, “Diabetes should be less awful and more awesome.” Haha! I’m so happy about the final title:subtitle combination, since it really illustrates the book’s framework and why I wrote it in the first place.

I also spent an enormous amount of time trying to figure out how to make the book as low cost as possible, but still look amazing. I originally wanted full color interior printing, but this made the book twice as expensive in paperback. I wasn’t willing to accept that tradeoff. I love the current model of a name-your-own price PDF download in full color, a paperback on Amazon for under $7 (the black-and-white interior still looks really good), and a Kindle version for $1.99.

Funnily enough, the writing process was the easiest part, though getting feedback on the book was always scary. It’s never easy to show your work to other people.

Kerri: What’s next, now that the book is live?

Adam:  For now, I’m laser focused on finding every possible avenue to get this book into people’s hands – whether that’s print copies or free digital versions.  And we will certainly do follow-up Adam’s Corner articles that talk about different pieces of the book.I’d also love to do an audio version, video snippets of different Bright Spots & Landmines, weekly Facebook Live Q&As with readers, and perhaps translation into other languages. But whew… one thing at a time! If you have any ideas you’d like to see, please let me know at brightspots@diaTribe.org!

Kerri: And how can people find more of your writing?

Adam:  Adam’s Corner is here on diaTribe.org, diaTribe’s Facebook page is here, and diaTribe’s twitter is here (@diaTribenews), and my twitter is here (@asbrown1).

Kerri:  Thanks so much for chatting, Adam.  Also, you adopted a dog? Awesome!  What kind?

Adam:  A mini schnauzer mix! I talk about him in the introduction and the exercise chapter 😃 A dog is an incredible Mindset and Exercise Bright Spot, all in one package! I’m a huge convert, despite my skepticism when Priscilla wanted to adopt. Definitely one of the best life decisions we’ve made in the past year.

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Thank you , Adam, for taking the time to talk and also for creating such a powerful resource for the diabetes community.  (And I have a soft spot for Adam because he has never yelled at me, despite my occasionally being spotty back in the day on getting my diaTribe columns to him on time.  To that same end, look for a reboot of the SUM Musings column over at diaTribe in the coming weeks!)  

Adam is patient, ridiculously well-informed, and when it comes to bright spots in the diabetes community, don’t look directly at Adam or you may burn your eyes.  Congratulations again on the book launch!!!  

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