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Posts tagged ‘insulin’

Hypo Perspectives.

Last night my low alarm went off like a siren in my bedroom, partly because I had hooked my phone up to a bluetooth speaker to (successfully) help amplify the Dexcom alarms, but mostly because my blood sugar was 50 mg/dL.

How the alarm didn’t wake up my daughter (clad in Captain American pajamas and asleep in my bed because Chris was out of town last night) is beyond me.  How it didn’t wake me up the first few times it went off is beyond me as well, since I was low for about 35 minutes before actually acknowledging it.  A text message from my husband, asking “Are you awake and drinking juice?” grabbed me from the fog.  (Thank you, Dexcom Share, for making the “Big Brother” moments worth the moments when I need a hand.)

Some lows are textbook ones in that they employ symptoms like a sweaty forehead and clumsy hands, but a juice box or some glucose tabs or a banana can take the edge off those symptoms at first bite, the adrenaline surge of the low quieted by a chewing jaw.  These lows don’t leave a hangover or a residue of panic.  They just happen, and then they’re over.

Other lows are so odd, so disconcerting, so thick with confusion and hypo fog that I find myself unable to put the straw into the juice box, or to even reason with my brain that a juice box is necessary.  Last night, my hypo-addled hands weren’t able to push me up onto my elbows so that I could eat or drink anything without spilling it all over the bed. 

My kid slept beside me, unaware and occasionally stretching so her hands tangled in her hair.

I frigging hate these kinds of lows.  Somehow, I ended up treating with juice and felt the need to wander downstairs into the kitchen and have a box of raisins.  And then a second box of raisins.  And then another glass of juice.  I remember standing at the kitchen island and taking two units of insulin after grossly over-treating this low, still wobbly from still being in the low.  I know I didn’t need to eat anything else after that first juice box but for some reason, my body needed comfort.

In that moment, I’d trade a 250 mg/dL for the waves of nausea and unconsciousness that lapped at me.

I went back to sleep damp with sweat, covered in juice.

This morning, the plastic sleeves of two juice boxes were on the bedside table.  I corrected the high blood sugar I had eaten myself into.  The bedsheets are in the wash in efforts to remove the carb count from their thread count.

The trench of a very unsettling overnight low blood sugar and the mountain that followed. #diabetes

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

#Insulin4All: A Chat with Elizabeth Rowley.

Last week at the International Diabetes Federation’s World Congress in Vancouver, I had a chance to briefly reconnect with Elizabeth Rowley from T1D International.  We talked about the #Insulin4All campaign and the work she and her team are doing to help provide access to people with diabetes around the globe, and how our online community can work together to improve lives across the globe.  Today, she’s sharing some of her thoughts on how we can change the world for PWD.

Thanks for taking the time to talk today, Elizabeth!  I see that the #Insulin4All was popular on World Diabetes Day again this year.  Can you tell me more about that campaign? 

The #insulin4all campaign was started last year by a network of organisations called the Access Alliance that are passionate about access to insulin, diabetes supplies, care, and education for all people with type 1 diabetes.

World Diabetes Day (WDD) started in 1991 in order to “draw attention to issues of paramount importance to the diabetes world” and has since become a huge day in the diabetes community for raising awareness about diabetes. The Access Alliance felt that while WDD is a wonderful thing, the true spirit of the day had been somewhat lost because people around the entire globe with diabetes were often forgotten. We wanted to do something more. So many people living with type 1 diabetes struggle to survive because they cannot afford or access their life-saving insulin, blood glucose strips, or basic healthcare. Others are caught in conflict where there is little humanitarian assistance for people with diabetes.

The aim of the campaign is to unite as a diabetes and global community to show governments, companies, and individuals that we recognize the problems mentioned above. It’s important that we stand together to work towards tangible solutions. The campaign gets bigger each year around World Diabetes Day, but we want everyone to support #insulin4all every day of the year.

How can people participate?

The easiest way to support the campaign is by using the hashtag on social media and spreading the world about the issues. There is a lot of content on the Tumblr page and on the T1International website that you can share to promote and push for #insulin4all. You can also still submit an #insulin4all image on the Tumblr page. All you need to do is take a picture of yourself holding up a piece of paper with #insulin4all written on it, submit it to the campaign page, and share it widely.

How does this campaign bring the mission of insulin for all to a higher level and what is your goal?

The diabetes community is a hugely powerful force and we have seen it unite to push for change from topics such as general diabetes awareness to access to CGMs. Many people with diabetes don’t realise that millions are dying premature death because they can’t access the basics that everyone living with the condition needs to survive. We want people to know that this is happening and we want to unite to change the situation. As with any change, the first step is to understand the problems to find the best solutions. The next step is building a force of advocates to ensure that change happens. That is what this campaign has already begun doing and will continue to do until everyone can live a full life with diabetes.

What makes this campaign different from other insulin access efforts, like the 100 Campaign?

The #insulin4all campaign is somewhat unique in that last year, for example, it had participation from people in over 40 countries around the world. It is very important to share the voices of others, especially those who are facing lack of access to insulin and supplies, and we are so glad to be able to do that through this campaign.

We support the 100 Campaign and love its clear and powerful idea of 100% access to insulin by 2022. Despite the hashtag, #insulin4all’s focus is not only on insulin, but on all of the ‘pieces of the diabetes puzzle’. Even if you have insulin, for example, if you don’t have a syringe to inject it with, or a means to know your blood sugar levels, you’re still in grave danger. We feel strongly that all of these things need to be taken into account when building solutions.

Finally, while we know the #insulin4all campaign is a powerful awareness and advocacy tool, we also know that it alone will not create sustainable change. The annual campaign is part of a wider organisation and movement that is working towards that change. T1International and the other Access Alliance members are taking on a truly collective and collaborative approach because we recognize that we are stronger when we work together. The members of the alliance all work with and are part of diabetes communities around the globe which helps us ensure that we fully understand the many complex issues faced by people with diabetes. *If you want to join the Access Alliance, get in touch with elizabeth@t1international.com*

Do you think the diabetes online community has global reach and can make a truly global difference?

Part of the issue we are bringing to light is that the diabetes online community is probably not global enough. This was certainly one of the motivations we had in setting up the campaign and the Access Alliance in the first place. We have been heartened to find that, as people learn about these issues, many are shocked and stunned – and they want to do something about it. We are confident that #insulin4all will grow the number of people that know about the issues and will therefore grow our power in numbers to speak out against the injustices.

Yes, change is possible, but there are no easy answers or quick fixes when it comes to ensuring everyone around the world can obtain insulin, syringes, test trips, glucometers, and the diabetes education needed to keep them alive. That makes it even more important that we determinedly search for those answers and find appropriate solutions. It’s an ongoing process but it’s a vital one if we are to see the kind of change that is needed for our brothers and sisters with diabetes around the globe.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

“Life with diabetes is complicated. Access to vital insulin, diabetes supplies and medical care should not be.” If you agree, support #insulin4all today or get in touch with elizabeth@t1international.com if you want to get further involved.

Pump Peelz Giveaway!

I’ve been a fan of Pump Peelz for several years, impressed by both their products and their back story.  The company, founded in 2011 by high school sweethearts turned married couple Scott and Emily, aims to “help people with diabetes live with more confidence by turning insecurities associated with diabetic accessories into a form of individual self-expression.”

Can’t argue with that, as the team at Pump Peelz is helping shift our one-size fits all, sometime very drab diabetes devices into personalized and fashionable conversation pieces.  (Because wouldn’t you rather be asked where you got your Dexcom sticker than “Hey, what’s your blood sugar?”)

The Pump Peelz team has offered some skinz as a giveaway here on Six Until Me, which I am very excited about because the cost to enter is minimal, but fun.  Here are the details:

To enter this giveaway, you need to create a diabetes-related haiku (a poem with three lines, the first containing five syllables, the second line containing seven syllables, and the third line back to five syllables) and share it in the comments section or on Twitter (make sure you tag me with @sixuntilme in your Tweet).  Winners will be chosen from a hat by my kid (because I’m low-tech, but trust me, we have a cool hat) and will receive a prize pack from the kind people at Pump Peelz.

I love adding a little flair to the sometimes mind-numbing plainness of diabetes technology.  Here are a few examples of the work they do at Pump Peelz:

For the Dexcom G4 receiver

A skin for your Omnipod

 

And if you’re a Pebble watch user, they’ll throw in one a decorative skin for your Pebble, too!

Once the three winners are selected, I’ll announce those here on SUM on Thursday morning.  The contest is open starting today and will close tomorrow night at midnight EST.  The winners will connect with Scott for their peelz, and for anyone who doesn’t happen to win, 15% off is available to readers using the coupon code “SixUntilMe”.

For more information on the company, you can check out their website or “like” them on Facebook.  (Is it required to put like into quotation marks?”)  And if you’re interested in winning some peelz of your own, be sure to enter the giveaway.  Huge thanks to Pump Peelz for making this giveaway possible, and I am excited to meet them in person at Friends for Life in a few weeks.

Poems don’t have to rhyme.
But if you count syllables,
You might win fun shit.

Plug It In.

I’m not a good traveler, but I am a good packer. Part of my preparation ritual is to make sure I only bring what I need and that outfits are tried on and coordinated before I go. (Because there was that one time I brought a shirt and forgot pants and that made for a different sort of panic before a presentation.)

Thinking ahead helps me prevent over-packing. (I have made a rule about not checking baggage, ever, if I can help it.) So before I left for a business trip on Thursday afternoon, my house was a brief flurry of coat hangers, dresses, and shoes. I tried on four or five different things before chucking them into my suitcase (who am I kidding – I military roll everything so it fits) and then it was time to get ready to leave the house.

It took me almost an hour to realize that, in my frenetic fashion show, I had my pump clipped to my hip but not connected to my infusion set. It wasn’t until I heard the Dexcom alarm let loose with the HIGH ALARM! that I realized my tubing was wagging like a tail. Disconnected from my body. Leaving me on an unintentional insulin hiatus.

So many variables influence my blood sugars – exercise! Insulin levels! Food! Stress! Exclamation points!

But sometimes it’s as simple as remembering to plug shit in.

Looking Back: Visual Reminders.

Nothing helps remind me more about the importance of being familiar with serving sizes and what they look like than being on the road for a few days.  Meals away from the comfort and familiarity of my kitchen make for some guesswork, and these last few days have shown me that I could use a refresher on serving sizes.  Here’s a look back at a post from 2012 about keeping your eye trained as to how “half a cup” really shapes up.

*   *   *

A deck of cards.  A baseball.  A pair of dice and you only look at one of them. (Sorry for the clumsiness; I think it’s weird to write “A die.” as a sentence.  Looks odd.)  A tennis ball.   A hockey puck.

The things that health-related articles use as “visual cues” for portion sizes and serving sizes makes me wish I was more athletic, because then I’d have a really strong feel for the size of these different balls, etc.  (Sidenote:  Hey. Ever write something you want to immediately delete but then you keep it and just wish your brain was less daft?)  But these visual cue things are helpful for me, because if I don’t take note of just how big “one small apple” really is, it’s easy to lose track of how much I’m eating.  I need to constantly refresh my eyes on serving sizes, which in turn helps me better estimate carbs when I’m SWAG (aka Scientific, Wild-Ass Guessing)’ing it.

(Second sidenote:  The hamburger pictured here looks exactly like a fudge-drizzled chocolate cookie, which is making my brain very confused.)

Which is what I spent part of my morning doing today:  busting out the measuring cups in my house and reminding myself what certain foods look like when properly measured out.  I’m not shooting for serving sizes or anything FDA official.  I needed to do this purely for carb assessment reasons.  What does 35 grams worth of Rice Chex measure out to look like?  How much salad dressing is 10 grams of carbs?  Brain, be reminded of what 28 carbs-worth of banana goodness looks like!!

Birdy thought I was a basketcase this morning, measuring things out and then putting them back.  “No eat banana, Mama?”  “No more cereal and milk, Mama?”  “That chicken is very good, right, Mama?” By the time I started eye-balling the lunch meat and measuring it on our kitchen scale, she threw her hands up in disgust and went to find her Thomas trains.  (Tertiary sidenote:  Spencer, the silver, streamlined diesel train, is the same size as 15 grams worth of banana, dagnabit.)

But now my brain is brought back to reality.  Less guesstimating and more true and proper estimating, which should help me fine-tune my boluses a touch.  Reminders like this are helpful in keeping me from sliding down that slippery slope of eating 18 lb apples and bathtubs full of Golden Grahams.

(Last sidenote:  I’m sorry that only 2/3 of this post made sense.)

 

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