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Posts tagged ‘insulin pump’

My IOB and Me.

There’s a lot of data that PWD (people with diabetes) spin through on a daily basis – carbs counts, insulin units, blood sugar results, blah, blah, blaaaaaaah there’s so much shit sometimes.  I’ve been encouraged by my endocrinologist to download my data and review it every week or two in order to assess trends over time, but I don’t do that as often as I should.  I’m more of a monthly downloader, and I definitely download every night-before-the-endo-appointment, but a systematic review of my diabetes data is one of those things I could do more consistently.

However, the data is crucial to my health success.  I just tend to lean more heavily on the daily data than the month-long reviews.

Like my beloved IOB.  IOB stands for “insulin on board” and it’s a tool in my insulin pump that calculates how much insulin from my most recent boluses is still “active” in my system.  And I don’t know if most pumpers love their IOB data as much as I do, but I LOVE mine.  Love.  Stupid love.  It’s part of the trifecta of diabetes that I rely on every night before bed.

The checklist is short, but always, always the same: every single night before I go to bed, I check my blood sugar on my meter, comparing that number against the CGM graph.  Then I click through on my CGM graph to get feel for how the day has mapped.  And then I click through on my pump to check my beloved IOB to see how much insulin might be in play.  (Okay, honestly I check on my daughter in her bed first.  She’s usually asleep with her hair tousled into a huge mess against her pillow, with Loopy curled up against her legs.  But then I do all the diabetes garbage.)

Checking the IOB in conjunction with the CGM graph and my glucose number gives me a fighting chance against middle-of-the-night hypoglycemia.  And in the last year or so, it’s been a check that’s worked really well.  Several times (last night, for instance), I will look at my data sources and determine that a low might be teased out overnight, and I can pop a glucose tab or run a temporary basal rate on my pump for an hour or two to keep me in range.

My overnight lows are way less frequent than they ever have been before, and that means I clean juice and sweat from my sheets way less often, so there is a practical bonus aside from the whole “not going wicked low while sleeping” thing.

There’s the takeaway:  IOB monitoring helps cut back on laundry.  Use all the money you save on detergent to buy a bionic pancreas!

 

Couched.

“Can I lay here?”  I pointed to the almost-available section of the couch, where if Chris moved his legs juuuuust a little bit and Siah got her fat furry butt off the cushion, I could curl up and let my brain go quiet after a full day of writing.

“Sure thing,” and Chris adjusted his body.

“No,” was the message Siah sent me with her cat telepathic powers, but I snuggled in anyway.

And in one, seamless movement, the couch cushion leapt up and grabbed the infusion set from my arm with its teeth and ripped it off.  The couch’s fangs were gigantic and its talons just as daunting, determined to keep any diabetes device from properly resting against my skin.  I was livid – this infusion set was only a day old! – but I knew I was no match for the couch.  It was huge, and it had an agenda of rage.

I eased away from the cushion slowly, trying to keep from agitating the angry beast.  The couch snarled and tensed, poised to make a play for my Dexcom sensor if I dared to get comfortable against its fabric again.

“You okay?”  Chris asked.

“Yeah.  The couch ripped off my infusion set,” I started to say, and then I felt the slow drag of couch claws against my shin, warning me to embrace silence.  “I mean, I ripped off my infusion set.  I did it.”

The couch quieted and settled back against the floor.  And I went upstairs into the bathroom to put a new infusion set on.  And when I came downstairs, I sat on the floor, the steady breath of the wicked couch prickling the hairs on the back on my neck.

“Next time …” it panted like Dr. Claw.  “Next time.”

 

Flick of the Wrist.

In the interests of getting through TSA in Orlando as quickly as possible and making my way over to my gate so I could find some iced coffee and a banana, I disconnected my insulin pump and put it through the x-ray machine, caring very little if it melted in the transaction because I was melting in the transaction.

The tram to the gates was arriving just as I was finished at security, so I grabbed my pump off the tray and held it in my hand. dragging my bag to the shuttle. Just after “stand CLEAR of the closing doors,” I reached around to the top of my hip and reconnected my infusion set, sticking the pump into my pocket.

A woman boarded the tram, her infant daughter strapped to her chest. I noticed her noticing me while I reconnected my pump.

“Insulin pump?”

“Excuse me?”

“Is that an insulin pump? Sorry – my son has diabetes and I recognized the pump.”

“Oh, yes.” I searched her wrist for an orange or green CWD bracelet but didn’t see one. “Were you here for the conference?”

“What conference?”

“The diabetes conference. It’s called Friends for Life and it’s put on by an organization called Children with Diabetes. It takes place here in Orlando, over at Disney.”

She smiled. “I’ve never heard of it, and I live right here in Orlando. What’s it called?”

“Friends for Life. It’s a diabetes conference for families with diabetes. Lots of kids with type 1 attend with their parents, and lots of adults like me who go to connect with other adults who have diabetes. It’s really nice, like diabetes camp. Community helps, you know?”

She nodded, and the baby on her chest flapped her arms happily. “My son goes to camp. He loves it. But I’ve never heard of the conference before.”

I reached into my bag and fished around for a pen. Nothing. Checked my pockets for a business card. Nothing. The tram was about to stop and ditch us at the gates, leaving me just a few seconds to try and explain how a few days in Florida can change your life for the better.

“What’s the conference called again?”

I grabbed the edge of my green bracelet and pulled it off my wrist.

It's on. #ffl15

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

“I know this seems weird to hand you a slightly-used conference bracelet, but the URL for the conference website is on it. Everyone who has diabetes wears one of these green bracelets. You see one of these and that person understands, you know?” I handed her the bracelet, pointing at the website address. “I hope this doesn’t seem creepy. It’s just an amazing experience, being around all of those other families, and it would be great to have you and your family check it out, if that’s your thing.”

She took the bracelet and put it in her pocket. “This is very nice of you. Thank you. I’ll check it out for sure.”

The tram doors opened and we stepped out.

“Where are you headed home to?”

“Rhode Island.”

“And you come here just for that conference?”

I thought about the week that had just passed, when I was surrounded by people who redefined family.

“All the way here. Green bracelets are pretty awesome.”

She waved, and her baby waved, too. “Thank you for passing this along. Safe travels back home. Maybe we’ll see you next year.”

Usually when I board the plane home from Friends for Life, I like to look down at my green bracelet because it reminds me of my PWD tribe.  This year, with a flick of the wrist, I was grateful it had found a new home.

Pump Peelz Giveaway Winners!

Time for the Pump Peelz Giveaway winners!  The original contest rules are from earlier this week are here, and the entries came in through blog post comments and Twitter. Some were poignant, some were silly, and all were written by people touched by diabetes.


Ahem … here we go.

All were so awesome
Random number thing picked three.
These are the winners:

It’s midnight again
Sugar monsters sucking life
Double-stuffs for win!

- Susan C.

Diagnosed last year
The only thing he can’t do
Is make insulin

- Maria Conroy


Winners!  I’ll be connecting you with Scott from Pump Peelz to receive your prizes, and for those who didn’t win, you can still use the “SixUntilMe” discount code at Pump Peelz for 15% off your order. Thanks for playing, and thank you so much to the team at Pump Peelz!!!

No Disassemble.

I need to exorcise the technology demons in my house.  Because everything is breaking.

It started several months ago, the issue with my laptop, but in the last two weeks, my computer has gone entirely bananas.  I have a Macbook Air as my primary office computer and the bulk of my work is on that machine.  And it worked fine for several years, until the trackpad on the computer started to over-react to everything.  I’d tap my finger on the trackpad and every email in my inbox would open, files would delete themselves, and browser windows threw themselves against the side of the glass.  Crazy shit.

“Why are you so sensitive?!” I yelled at the computer.

“I don’t knooooooooooooow!!” It sobbed in return.

I did a lot of Google searches, and my computer wasn’t the only one feeling super fragile and sensitive.  It was not alone.  (And if your computer is going berserk, you are not alone.)  But last week, while traveling, the computer refused to click on any damn thing while simultaneously clicking on every damn thing, it wouldn’t connect to wifi, and it bit me when I opened it.  (Sharp teeth on that little sucker.)  Because I do not work in a formal office but instead house my business entirely in a computer, I had to make the rotten decision to replace my computer.

Fine.  That problem is solved, albeit in the most expensive and irritating way possible.  Then last night my FitBit decided to go rogue on me, in the middle of an intensely competitive FitBit challenge (cough – @miller7 – cough), rendering it useless.  This morning, my Dexcom receiver did that weird “BEEEEEEEEEP!” thing where static electricity or something courses through it and it restarts on its own.  En route to a doctor’s appointment at the crack of dawn this morning, the GPS in my car took me to somewhere that was not the doctor’s office but instead a supermarket (so I bought apples).

Everything with a battery or a digital footprint is breaking.  I’m afraid.  And then I realized that the way I receive my insulin is via an insulin pump, powered by a battery, chock full o’ breakable technology.  A cold panic washed over me as I worried the tech demons were contagious.

“Shhhhhhh … you’re okay.  You’re my friend,” I said to my insulin pump, as I held it in the palm of my hand like a fuzzy hamster.  “Be good.  No disassemble.  Keep working,” I murmured to it, stroking it gently with one fingertip.

Here’s hoping.

Boop Beep Boop.

“Boop beep boop!”

The sound is unmistakable, as it used to ring out from my hip for so many years.  That noise, the sound of a Medtronic insulin pump alerting for whatever reason, used to be my soundtrack before Fur Elise and the “boop boop boop!” of the Animas pump replaced it.

Boop beep boop!”

I was sitting outside of the classroom where my daughter was meeting with the school administrators for her pre-kindergarten screening tests when I heard that familiar noise.  (The tests upon which I will not comment because this whole process is so strange and so involved – whatever happened to reading books and milk cartons and coloring?  In related news, I’ve become an old bird.)

Looking up, I saw a teacher walking down the hallway, casually talking to her colleague with their lunch bags in hand, her fingertips deftly and instinctively pressing the buttons on her insulin pump, administering what I assumed was a lunch bolus.

“Boop beep boop!”

Even though I’ve found so much comfort in the diabetes community and have made lifelong friends who are funny, kind, and also happen to not make their own insulin, I wanted to leap up and say hi to the woman in the elementary school who also wore an insulin pump.  She was here!  In my town!  Randomly!  A PWD (person with diabetes) spotting in-the-wild is always exciting.  Kind of like finding Bigfoot, only with fewer over-the-shoulder glances and more “see a birthday cake!” faces.

But instead, I sat in the folding chair and minded my own business, secretly thrilled once again by the knowledge that it only takes a quiet series of beeps and boops to remind me that I am not alone.

 

Plug It In.

I’m not a good traveler, but I am a good packer. Part of my preparation ritual is to make sure I only bring what I need and that outfits are tried on and coordinated before I go. (Because there was that one time I brought a shirt and forgot pants and that made for a different sort of panic before a presentation.)

Thinking ahead helps me prevent over-packing. (I have made a rule about not checking baggage, ever, if I can help it.) So before I left for a business trip on Thursday afternoon, my house was a brief flurry of coat hangers, dresses, and shoes. I tried on four or five different things before chucking them into my suitcase (who am I kidding – I military roll everything so it fits) and then it was time to get ready to leave the house.

It took me almost an hour to realize that, in my frenetic fashion show, I had my pump clipped to my hip but not connected to my infusion set. It wasn’t until I heard the Dexcom alarm let loose with the HIGH ALARM! that I realized my tubing was wagging like a tail. Disconnected from my body. Leaving me on an unintentional insulin hiatus.

So many variables influence my blood sugars – exercise! Insulin levels! Food! Stress! Exclamation points!

But sometimes it’s as simple as remembering to plug shit in.

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