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Posts tagged ‘IDF’

Diabetes Month, Diabetes Year.

Diabetes Awareness Month is almost over, closing out on November 30th.  Throughout the month, I’ve watched some really inspiring efforts take flight to raise awareness for diabetes, including the Project Blue November campaign.  Project Blue November has been a big part of my Facebook feed throughout the month, showcasing photos of advocates and celebrities alike sporting their blue circle pin.

My blue circle pin is something I wear every time I’m out in public.  I have one that I take on-and-off whatever jacket I’m wearing and a one permanently stuck on the bookbag I use when I’m traveling.

Diabetes Month is almost over, but I wear my awareness everywhere I travel. #PWDpride. Also, #rhodypride.

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

I don’t spend the majority of my days on a diabetes advocacy soapbox, but having that pin on me at all times makes me feel like I’m wearing a teeny Bat-Signal of advocacy.  It sends out a signal that I love someone (many someones) with diabetes.  It’s a beacon for broken islets.  It’s a sign that I care about the community as a whole.

Every month is diabetes month when you live with it.  This disease is every day, every month, all year long without respite.  But it’s not a “woe is me” headgame.  It’s more a “keep going; life is worth the effort” sort of mentality.

This month has been more scattered than usual, and I felt like I kind of phoned it in for diabetes month.  My focus was on other things, other people, other events and honestly?  That break felt good.  I think when the focus is “supposed to be diabetes,” I lose steam.  (File it under “Don’t Tell Me What To Do,” which might be the biggest file in my mental cabinet.)  Advocacy has to feel right, and natural, and not forced for me.  Finding my footing sometimes requires a few weeks of mental quiet.

I’ll keep my pin on.  And when I’m ready to raise my voice again, I’ll do just that.  In the meantime, I need to feel comfortable with whatever level of storytelling and sharing fits my need, regardless of the month or awareness initiative.

Guest Post: No Child Should Die of Diabetes.

Veerle Vanhuyse is off and running … literally.  Verlee lives with type 1 diabetes and is running the NYC Marathon in a few weeks, aiming to raise awareness and funds for the IDF’s Life for a Child program.  Today, I’m proud to be hosting a post from Veerle about her marathon goals!

*   *   *

A quarter of a century it’s been already but it still feels like yesterday. About to turn 16 and counting the days to leave for France with a bunch of teenagers to learn the language. I hadn’t been feeling well over the last few weeks and my trip to France became a trip to the hospital. Diabetes! I took my very first shot of insulin on my birthday. Sweet sixteen indeed!

In the beginning, I did really bad, didn’t take care of it at all. Only in my late twenties(!), I took diabetes more seriously and got my a1C’s from 9+ to 5%.

Eighteen years and a child later, I started running. And in eight years time I went from 100 meter and being exhausted (I’m not kidding), to 5K, 10K, half a marathon and finally the full monster; Berlin Marathon 2012.

That sad girl back in 1987 would’ve never guessed she would be doing what I’m about to do in one month:  Being at the start of the mother of all marathons, New York City 2014!

Needless to say, I am very excited about this upcoming event. But make no mistake, there’s no such thing as knowing exactly how to anticipate with the sugars before a long run, or any run for that matter. Every workout is different, depending on so many factors all diabetics deal with every single day.

Three weeks before the Berlin marathon, I suddenly realized I should grab the opportunity to raise money for diabetes. And I did. 1.700 euro went to research at the University Hospital in Leuven, Belgium. But this time I wanted to do something more specific. It didn’t take me long to find a new great goal. Surfing the web for a few hours I found a wonderful initiative called ‘Life for a Child’ supported by the International Diabetes Federation. I read about Dr. Marguerite De Clerck, a Belgian nun who spent the past 55 years treating children with diabetes in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

It instantly hit me! THIS was a project I immediately believed in and I wanted to make a difference for.  In the end my goal is comparable to the wonderful Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign: Provide children and youth in developing countries the basic care they need to stay alive with diabetes.

So far, I raised 2.500 euro, and I’m working really hard to at least double this amount.  I’m hoping to help families in Kinshasa keeping their loved ones alive.

It is a clear message: No child should die of diabetes.

*   *   *

I asked Veerle to provide a bio, and the one she sent to me in first person language was too laced with passion to edit in any way.

Here’s Veerle, according to Verlee:  “There’s the Belgian, so called ‘outgoing’ 43 year old, who talks a lot and who’s always in for a joke. And there is the T1 diabetic since 27 years, who can be really sad about the battle she has to fight against the disease every single day. “She deals with it really well,” people – even close to me – would say. They have no idea. One way to “deal with it” is running ! A lot! And in less than 4 weeks, I’ll be living my dream: NYC marathon ! Last race, because there’s also arthritis in my foot now. With this last 42,195km, I’ll be raising money for Life for a Child, to provide children in Kinshasa with the necessary supplies, proper care, and some decent education they need so badly. I am extremely passionate about it, and I want to scream as hard as I can: Please people, read my website and find it in your heart to donate, donate, donate!!!”

To donate to Veerle’s efforts, please visit this link on her websiteThanks for raising awareness, Veerle!

February Comes Fast.

Chris always sums up Spare a Rose in the same way:  “It’s so simple. So sticky. And so important.”

Because it is.

February is fast-approaching (Don’t act like you don’t know – it’s October today!  Time refuses to stand still.) and now is the time to start thinking about how you and your company can participate in the Spare a Rose campaign next Valentine’s Day.  February 1 – 14th.

Yeah, I said you and your company.  This topic came up on a call a few months ago, about opening the campaign to offices and employers.  “Earn a casual dress day for your office!” sort of sentiments (except when I pitched this idea to a super cool Austin PR firm, it sort of backfired because their dress code is already casual, so I recommended a Wear a Tux to Work day).  Put an empty flower vase on the front desk with a sign that says, “Best bouquet of roses I’ve ever received!!” with a link to SpareARose.org.  There are a lot of fun ways to bring awareness and funding for Life for a Child.

Also, now is a perfect time to bring up Spare A Rose to media outlets who might be planning their editorial calendars for next year already.  If you’d like to see the campaign highlighted in your magazine of choice, reach out to the editor and let them know about it.

You can sign up to receive updates on the campaign here.

You can learn more about the In My Office ideas here.

Want some beautiful images?  Here you go.

Here’s a handy FAQ about Spare a Rose.

It’s a simple sentiment with tremendous outcome:  spare a rose, save a child.  Thanks for thinking ahead to February and being part of the solution.

 

Official Spare a Rose Totals.

Official totals for the Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign came in at $27,265.17, from 832 donations.  Below is a second letter from Dr. Graham Ogle, thanking our community for our participation:

 

[Link to full-size PDF file]

I love how community efforts gave rise to a beautiful message from the DOC to our friends, globally.  And I also love how folks here at home spared a rose and made this campaign part of their personal love story.

Like Matthew, who spared a dozen roses for his PWD love Sarah …

… only to find that she had done the same for him.

Thanks to everyone for their support, participation, and passion for this effort.  I’m already excited to see what we can do next year!

 

Happy Flowerless Valentine’s Day: Spare a Rose.

Today is the last day of the Spare A Rose campaign, and as of this morning, the diabetes community has raised $19821.34 from 604 donations. Our original goal was to raise $10,000, and we’ve almost met that goal twice over in the course of two weeks.  And it’s still early this Valentine’s Day – final totals will be compiled over the weekend and shared with us on Monday.  You can still donate!

We received a letter from the International Diabetes Foundation this morning, thanking us for our contributions:

(click here to download the full PDF)

I can’t find the words that properly express the love for and the pride in the diabetes community I have today.  Happy (flowerless) Valentine’s Day to each and every one of you, and thank you for your work as a team for the global diabetes community.  Together, we’ve made a difference.

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