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Posts tagged ‘IDF’

Spare a Rose 2016: Final Totals.

In 2016 the diabetes community, both online and off, made a huge difference for children with type 1 diabetes in developing countries.  This year’s Spare a Rose campaign raised $25,331 from 537 donations, saving 422 children.

Read that again, please?

Four hundred and twenty-two children.

Through the endless generosity of people in this community, donating their time to share the message, their ability to rally support, and their willingness to give both emotionally and financially, we helped save the lives of 422 children.

Since the beginning of the Spare a Rose campaign back in 2013, we’ve directly influenced the lives of 1,422 children in 36 countries.  This is a big deal.  Each number in that 1,422 represents a single kid, no longer struggling for access.  Imagine if that were your kid.  Imagine if that were you.

Thank you to the companies who participated and matched donations, who shared it with their employees, and who threw their social media muscle behind the effort.  Thank you to the individual members of the DOC who, far and wide, shared the donation link and their reasons for believing.  Thank you to Life for a Child for providing a way for small change to make a big difference.

And thank YOU.  This campaign is effective because everyone owns it, and everyone benefits from it.  The lives of these children are improved because of you.  You shared the donation link.  You told your coworkers.  You reached into your own pocket and spared five dollars.  Every voice matters.

The difference we made as a community, for our community, is because of you.

Guest Post: #SpareARose and Symplur.

I’m late with today’s post, but it’s a good one.  🙂  This afternoon, Chris Snider of A Consequence of Hypoglycemia has contributed a guest post about Symplur and the Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign.  It’s an in-depth look at how the stats of the #sparearose hashtag campaign influenced the spread of the message.  This post is an interesting peek at where analytics and community passion line up, and where they don’t.  Thanks, Chris, for offering your insight!

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I started working with the folks at Symplur at the beginning of this year. My objective was to tell stories and bring the patient community further into the conversation around data – specifically the data they are generating through health conversations on Twitter. After the Spare a Rose campaign concluded, I reached out to Kerri to see if I could help shine a light on the 2-week whirlwind using Symplur’s fancy analytics tool, Signals. I was given four questions to try to address.

1. How did the message spread? Did it reach outside of people with “diabetes” in their profile?
2. What kinds of messages resonated on the whole? Calls to donate, stories about why insulin matters, etc?
3. Did people with small reach still have a big impact because of the close knit nature of the DOC?
4. Can the data prove that every voice does matter?

(1.) What the data says: people associating themselves with diabetes in their screen name, user name, or description represented 43.9% (321) of #sparearose participants, but generated 63.5% (5,825,580) of the impressions. What is difficult to report on is how many of these impressions overlap within the community. How many followers do each of the 43.9% have that are associated with diabetes in one form or another? How many impressions from the other 56.1% were made on people living with or associated by diabetes? It’s difficult to truly parse out where the venn diagram sits, but I think it’s safe to say the diabetes community came strong with their effort to spread the word. This does leave me with some bigger questions to consider for 2016: How might we increase the number of people sharing #sparearose that aren’t immediately associated with diabetes? Should that ratio always favor the diabetes community? How might the appeal of Spare a Rose better resonate with people without diabetes?

(2.) I tried to see what kind of activity was generated around tweets featuring the word ‘donate’ and ‘insulin’ as those are the two biggest subjects related to the Spare a Rose campaign. Every tweet including the word donate included a link to sparearose.org or the subsequent donation page. Similarly, 93% of links including the word insulin included a link to one of those two pages. It makes sense, right? If we’re going to ask people to donate, we need to show them where to go. If we’re going to appeal to the life-saving insulin #sparearose provides, we need to include a link to show people where to go. Looking past the percentages, however, reveals something quite curious. There were over twice as many (2.3x) tweets featuring the word insulin as there were the word donate. What would the final fundraising totals look like if more tweets mentioned the fact that one of the goals of #sparearose is to collect donations? Something to think about, perhaps.

One other stat I noticed was that of all the #sparearose tweets, 67% of the ones that were recorded were Retweets. I wonder what this data would show if more communication about #sparearose was original thought rather than rebroadcasting the words of someone else. To be fair, I’m just as guilty of this as the next person. Sometimes someone else does a better job of saying what I wanted to say and rather than repurpose someone else’s thoughts and words, a simple RT is enough to get the point across.

(3.) To address this, I tried to determine what maximum follower count yielded half of the total impressions from the reporting period. And, what maximum follower count yielded half of the tweets. Where is the tipping point in the makeup of participants that best represents how much of an influence a smaller following can generate. My impressions goal was 3,536,645. Tweets was 868.

Of all the people participating in #sparearose on Twitter, participants with 19,150 or fewer followers generated a little over half of the impressions recorded – How many participants have fewer than 19,150 followers? 97%. 19,000 twitter followers isn’t realistic for most of us, so to put all of this in perspective, participants with 1,000 or fewer followers generated 3% of the total impressions recorded. A single tweet from Crystal Bowersox makes a huge difference in terms of exposure.

Of all the people participating in #sparearose on Twitter, participants with 945 or fewer followers sent a little over half of the tweets during the reporting period. So, most of the tweets came from people with less than 945 followers, but they generated less than 3% of the impressions? My thoughts on this lead into the final question.

(4.) Do small voices matter? Unfortunately I can’t report on how many links were clicked, whose tweets generated the most clicks to sparearose.org. Crystal Bowersox understands the value of a vial of insulin, but do her 60,000 followers? But, for someone with 150 followers, how many of them are going to acknowledge and engage with a donation ask? It feels cold making all of this a numbers game, but the numbers fascinate me. Is there a point where you have too many followers to trust that any significant percentage will engage with a fundraising ask? How likely will followers outside of the diabetes community donate? Should we, all of us, try to cultivate a following outside of the diabetes community in addition to the relationships we build up among the pancreatically-challenged? Is it a matter of making the right ask or the right number of asks?

So we’re clear, I don’t think it’s the responsibility of the entire diabetes community to think about the nuts and bolts of how all this works. What matters most is the passion to connect with others and help educate whoever will listen to the reality that a little can mean a lot to a child with diabetes. Thanks to people like Kerri, we can make a difference. Even if the numbers from Symplur may suggest otherwise, believe me when I tell you that every voice does matter. Every one of you reading this, telling your story, paving the way for someone else with diabetes to feel safe enough to join our crazy little group, all of us are making a difference.

Spare a Rose, Save a Child.

From February 1 – 14, the diabetes online community is hosting our annual Spare A Rose campaign.  You remember that one, right?  The one where you send eleven roses instead of twelve on Valentine’s Day, taking the value of that saved rose (averaged out to $5) and donating that to the International Diabetes Federation’s Life for a Child program, which provides life-saving insulin and resources for children with diabetes in developing countries.

We need you.

Yes, you.

You’re part of this, you know.  If you’re reading these words, or any words written by a person touched by diabetes, you are touched by diabetes.  Maybe you’re the parent of a child with diabetes.  Maybe you’re an app developer looking to connect with the diabetes community.  Maybe you run a magazine that hosts health-related articles.  Maybe you’re a PR company that hopes to influence the diabetes community.  Maybe you’re a representative from a diabetes company, or a teacher who has a student with diabetes in their class, or a researcher who studies this disease.

We need you to help amplify the Spare a Rose message.  You can donate to the charity, share the Spare A Rose link with your friends and colleagues, and truly take this initiative, this passion – and our global community –  to a powerful new level.

If you’ve emailed a diabetes advocate, asking them to share your latest press release or to engage in your survey, please spare a rose.

If you work in the diabetes industry and you leave diabetes in your office when you go home at night, remember that people with diabetes don’t ever leave diabetes behind.  And that many people with diabetes struggle to gain access to the drug that keeps them alive.  Considering bringing this campaign to your office.  Please spare a rose.

If you are touched by diabetes in any way – the partner of, the friend of, the coworker of, the child of, the parent of, the neighbor of a person with diabetes – please spare a rose.

If you are part of the greater patient community, I’m asking you to walk with the diabetes community for two weeks and help us make a difference in the life of a child.  With your raised voices, we make a greater difference.  Please spare a rose.

This is where we shine, you guys; where we take care of our own.  Where we can take our collective power, not as people with picky pancreases but instead as people with full and grateful hearts.  Show your love for this community on Valentine’s Day by sending one less rose to a loved one and instead providing life for a child.

Flowers die.  Children shouldn’t.

Please spare a rose.

And please spread the word!

 

Diabetes Month, Diabetes Year.

Diabetes Awareness Month is almost over, closing out on November 30th.  Throughout the month, I’ve watched some really inspiring efforts take flight to raise awareness for diabetes, including the Project Blue November campaign.  Project Blue November has been a big part of my Facebook feed throughout the month, showcasing photos of advocates and celebrities alike sporting their blue circle pin.

My blue circle pin is something I wear every time I’m out in public.  I have one that I take on-and-off whatever jacket I’m wearing and a one permanently stuck on the bookbag I use when I’m traveling.


Diabetes Month is almost over, but I wear my awareness everywhere I travel. #PWDpride. Also, #rhodypride.

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

I don’t spend the majority of my days on a diabetes advocacy soapbox, but having that pin on me at all times makes me feel like I’m wearing a teeny Bat-Signal of advocacy.  It sends out a signal that I love someone (many someones) with diabetes.  It’s a beacon for broken islets.  It’s a sign that I care about the community as a whole.

Every month is diabetes month when you live with it.  This disease is every day, every month, all year long without respite.  But it’s not a “woe is me” headgame.  It’s more a “keep going; life is worth the effort” sort of mentality.

This month has been more scattered than usual, and I felt like I kind of phoned it in for diabetes month.  My focus was on other things, other people, other events and honestly?  That break felt good.  I think when the focus is “supposed to be diabetes,” I lose steam.  (File it under “Don’t Tell Me What To Do,” which might be the biggest file in my mental cabinet.)  Advocacy has to feel right, and natural, and not forced for me.  Finding my footing sometimes requires a few weeks of mental quiet.

I’ll keep my pin on.  And when I’m ready to raise my voice again, I’ll do just that.  In the meantime, I need to feel comfortable with whatever level of storytelling and sharing fits my need, regardless of the month or awareness initiative.

Guest Post: No Child Should Die of Diabetes.

Veerle Vanhuyse is off and running … literally.  Verlee lives with type 1 diabetes and is running the NYC Marathon in a few weeks, aiming to raise awareness and funds for the IDF’s Life for a Child program.  Today, I’m proud to be hosting a post from Veerle about her marathon goals!

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A quarter of a century it’s been already but it still feels like yesterday. About to turn 16 and counting the days to leave for France with a bunch of teenagers to learn the language. I hadn’t been feeling well over the last few weeks and my trip to France became a trip to the hospital. Diabetes! I took my very first shot of insulin on my birthday. Sweet sixteen indeed!

In the beginning, I did really bad, didn’t take care of it at all. Only in my late twenties(!), I took diabetes more seriously and got my a1C’s from 9+ to 5%.

Eighteen years and a child later, I started running. And in eight years time I went from 100 meter and being exhausted (I’m not kidding), to 5K, 10K, half a marathon and finally the full monster; Berlin Marathon 2012.

That sad girl back in 1987 would’ve never guessed she would be doing what I’m about to do in one month:  Being at the start of the mother of all marathons, New York City 2014!

Needless to say, I am very excited about this upcoming event. But make no mistake, there’s no such thing as knowing exactly how to anticipate with the sugars before a long run, or any run for that matter. Every workout is different, depending on so many factors all diabetics deal with every single day.

Three weeks before the Berlin marathon, I suddenly realized I should grab the opportunity to raise money for diabetes. And I did. 1.700 euro went to research at the University Hospital in Leuven, Belgium. But this time I wanted to do something more specific. It didn’t take me long to find a new great goal. Surfing the web for a few hours I found a wonderful initiative called ‘Life for a Child’ supported by the International Diabetes Federation. I read about Dr. Marguerite De Clerck, a Belgian nun who spent the past 55 years treating children with diabetes in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

It instantly hit me! THIS was a project I immediately believed in and I wanted to make a difference for.  In the end my goal is comparable to the wonderful Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign: Provide children and youth in developing countries the basic care they need to stay alive with diabetes.

So far, I raised 2.500 euro, and I’m working really hard to at least double this amount.  I’m hoping to help families in Kinshasa keeping their loved ones alive.

It is a clear message: No child should die of diabetes.

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I asked Veerle to provide a bio, and the one she sent to me in first person language was too laced with passion to edit in any way.

Here’s Veerle, according to Verlee:  “There’s the Belgian, so called ‘outgoing’ 43 year old, who talks a lot and who’s always in for a joke. And there is the T1 diabetic since 27 years, who can be really sad about the battle she has to fight against the disease every single day. “She deals with it really well,” people – even close to me – would say. They have no idea. One way to “deal with it” is running ! A lot! And in less than 4 weeks, I’ll be living my dream: NYC marathon ! Last race, because there’s also arthritis in my foot now. With this last 42,195km, I’ll be raising money for Life for a Child, to provide children in Kinshasa with the necessary supplies, proper care, and some decent education they need so badly. I am extremely passionate about it, and I want to scream as hard as I can: Please people, read my website and find it in your heart to donate, donate, donate!!!”

To donate to Veerle’s efforts, please visit this link on her websiteThanks for raising awareness, Veerle!

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