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Posts tagged ‘glucose meter’

Review: Verio Flex Meter.

For years, my love for the One Touch Verio Sync meter knew no limits.  Despite a slightly MS-DOS interface that only showed me one result at a time and didn’t let me scroll back to other results unless I loaded them to the Reveal application, I loved this meter.  It was small, it was accurate (as compared to my Dexcom CGM, which I feel is my personal gold standard), and it was covered my by insurance.

I really liked how it worked with the Reveal app the most, though.  I have always struggled with maintaining a blood sugar logbook, and being able to bluetooth my results to my phone and have them collect in an at-a-glance and also an in-depth data map took the heat off my data angst.

But not everyone loved the Sync.  And recently, it was scrapped and replaced by the Verio Flex meter.

I resisted the Flex mostly because I hate change (<– curmudgeon font), but a few weeks ago, I finally switched over (after putting my two Verio Syncs into a cryptex).  Here are my initial thoughts:

PROS:

The Verio Flex turns off immediately after you take the test strip out of it.  This is a nice change from the Sync, where it would either have to time out or be pushed off using the button after each blood sugar check.  The auto-off helps conserve battery (more on why that matters in the CONS section).

There’s a small color chart on the bottom of meter screen (on the actual housing of the meter – see picture) where an arrow shows up underneath each BG result to indicate low, high, or in range.  While this isn’t as useful for me because I’m familiar with the ranges recommended for me, this could be a really useful feature for folks newly diagnosed or who aren’t as familiar with in-range and out-of-range.

It comes with a Delica lancing device, which is my favorite, if you can say such a thing about a device meant to pierce skin.

It’s durable and decently priced.  I paid $19.99 for mine at CVS and when it dropped onto the hard kitchen tile that same night, it did not smash to bits.

CONS:

The battery life doesn’t appear to be awesome.  My glucose meters in the past have taken over a year to burn through a battery, but I’ve already replaced the Flex battery after about a month.  I’m sure the bluetooth transmission cycles the battery quickly, but it was irritating to have to switch out the battery so soon.  I like my t:slim pump because it can be plugged in and charged versus needing to keep a stash of AA batteries, and I liked the Sync for the same reason.

No light!  On the Sync, there was a light at the top of the meter that was bright enough to test in the middle of the night without turning on the lamp.  This was an awesome feature, and I have no idea why it was removed from the Flex, but it’s SORELY MISSED.  Never underestimate the value of a little light that keeps you from putting blood on the strip in a mangled way, wasting the strip.

And the syncing feature takes a while.  I feel like the Sync synced faster while the Flex takes more time to flex its bluetooth muscle.  The way the data maps on the app is identical, so that’s fine, but getting that data there is something I have to remember to do, so every second matters.

Overall, the Flex is similar enough to the Sync that I won’t bust the cryptex back open yet, but hopefully the next iteration will be better on battery, upload automagically to my pump, and the light will return!

It’s Just a Blood Sugar Check.

Checking my blood sugar takes less than 30 seconds.  Truly – upcapping the bottle of test strips, inserting the strip, pricking my finger tip, squeezing blood onto the absorption pad on the test strip, waiting the five second countdown of my meter to see the result up on the screen, and then taking the strip out and turning off the meter.

Thirty seconds.

Great.  No big deal.  Easy-peasy, and other rhyming phrases.

Let’s add in the responsive elements.  First, I anticipate the result.

Have you ever had go force yourself to check your blood sugar because you don’t want to see the result?  You know you’re high, so you want to avoid confirming it because seeing that number adds to the emotional failure quotient.  Have you ever forgone checking your blood sugar because you know you’re low, choosing fast-acting glucose sources over the 30 second confirmation routine?  The process of checking blood sugar isn’t just the installation of strip, pricking of finger.  There’s oftentimes an emotional hurdle that needs to be leapt over first, forcing me to attempt to view data as data instead of data as self-worth.

Then I perform the glucose check.

Then I respond mentally.  What is that number?  Do I have insulin on board?  Have I exercised in the last hour or two?  Am I planning on exercising?  Do I need to correct the number, either with food or insulin or exercise, to bring it into range?  Am I okay to leave it alone?

Normal questions like, “Am I hungry?” come to mind oddly late in this hierarchy.

But before the mental response, I respond emotionally.  A blood glucose result of any kind stirs up emotions, even when I try to immediately squash them.  There’s pride built into a 100 mg/dL.  Anxiety built into a 50 mg/dL.  Guilt baked right the fuck into a 300 mg/dL.  This is what keeps me from viewing my data as simply “data,” because every number represents something I’ve done or didn’t do … and I need to remind myself more that the thing I’m honestly not doing is making insulin.  The rest is a basket of beady variables that spill out unpredictably.

Checking my blood sugar is important because it gives me a view of where I’m at and helps me set the pace for where I’m going.  But it’s never “just a blood sugar check.”  It’s more than that.  There’s so much mental and emotional real estate dedicated to a 30 second process.

 

104 mg/dL.

Am I the only one who stops when this number pops up on a glucose meter and thinks, “Damn.  That could be on the meter advertisement box.  I’ve got this.”

Meter box advertisement #latergram

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

(Ignore the fact that I will surely be low, or high, or somewhere not exactly 104 mg/dL in a matter of hours.  But in that moment, I’ve got this.  Actually, since writing my post the other day, I’ve been actively working to spend more time in range and I’m seeing better results.  Averages are tipping back into my favor, and I’m reminded once again how much of diabetes is a total crap shoot and how much is something I can change … and how much those ratios of crap:change fluctuate.)

Missing Meter.

The initial search through my bag was kind of nonchalant.  “Where is my meter bag?”  Bright pink with a smiling bear on one side, it’s a hard bag to misplace, even in the seemingly unending abyss of my purse.

But the flurry of leaving the house that morning to catch an early flight left me mentally snowed-in.  I brought it with me, right?  I know I checked my blood sugar that morning, and I had a clear memory (didn’t I?) of pricking my finger on the plane after we had reached cruising altitude, so where the hell was my glucose meter?  I had it just a few hours ago?

“Where is my glucose meter?”

The search went from casual to frantic in a matter of minutes, when I realized that my meter bag was nowhere to be found.  Not in my suitcase, not in my book bag, not in the rental car.  No memory of where the hell it could be, and all the moments I’ve ever checked my blood sugar on a plane were melting together.  Did that happen today, or had I been working off info from my CGM graph all day long?

Just as Chris and I confirmed that my meter was, indeed, MIA, my Dexcom sensor alarm went off, warning me that my sensor was going to die in two hours.  And the “low battery” alarm went off a few minutes later on my pump, reminding me that it needed a new battery.

“Everything is breaking and I’m an idiot.  I’ve never, ever left my glucose meter behind before.  Ever!  On so many of my trips, I’ve packed an extra meter, but even on the trips where I didn’t, I still didn’t lose my meter!  I’ve never lost my glucose meter before, in like three decades with diabetes.”  I was rambling, but frustrated.  The device I needed most to properly dose the drug I needed most?  Missing.  Data crucial to my safe survival?  Inaccessible without purchasing a backup system.

(And, as luck would have it, I had just refilled my meter bag with a brand new bottle of 50 test strips and a fresh AA battery for my pump.  Reminded me of the time I replaced my car’s exhaust system, filed the tank up with gas, and then proceeded to total the car.)

Thankfully, finding a pharmacy that sold the brand of glucose meter I had strips at home for was easy enough.  (I didn’t want to have to replace the meter, again, when I got home.)  And thankfully, we have the means to purchase a meter and a bottle of test strips without insurance coverage.  But holy shit, I was shocked to see the sticker price for a bottle of 25 test strips.

“Forty five dollars?  For 25 test strips?  That’s bananas!”  I said the pharmacist.  “How do people afford these things without insurance coverage?”

She shrugged.  “They don’t.  They buy the CVS brand and the strips that go with that one.  Most people don’t pay for the top tier strips out of pocket.”

“But the accuracy is …”

“It’s what it is,” she said.  She finished ringing up the meter and strips (and AA batteries for the pump), bringing my grand total up over $100.  For a meter, 25 test strips, and batteries.

“This is the price for maintenance,” I said to Chris.  “For the stuff that keeps me healthy.  I can’t imagine what the cost would be to do more than “maintain.'”

After reuniting with a glucose meter, our trip continued on without issue.  But throughout the rest of the week, I thought about having access, and having the financial means to replace things I accidentally lose, and being grateful.  I thought about the Spare a Rose campaign and how far $5 goes.

This holiday season, I’m more grateful than ever for more things than I realized.

(And when we came home on Friday evening and I went into the bathroom, I saw my glucose meter sitting on the bathroom counter, halfway hidden underneath a hand towel.  Never again!)

 

Shake It Like a Bottle of Test Strips.

I can’t stop – I shake that stupid bottle of test strips EVERY SINGLE TIME before I open it.

 

 

What, you don’t?!

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