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Posts tagged ‘#dsma’

Looking Back: Of Cocktails and Community.

Today, after a lovely morning at the dentist (once again fixing this issue), I’m recovering from a half-droopy novocained face and, as a result, am looking back at a post from 2013 about search engine optimization, diabetes, and cocktails … sort of.

* * *

“So what you should do is see what people are searching for and then carefully tailor your posts to draw in those searches. Pick the search engine terms that there isn’t a high competition for, giving you an advantage in Google’s search algorithm.”

The example he used was pretty simple: “10 Best Cocktails for People with Diabetes”

In a discussion during the European Bloggers Summit in Barcelona (running alongside EASD), a search engine optimization expert gave a presentation about seeding blog posts with keywords in order to cast a greater net for readership. The SEO strategist was helpful, and had wonderful advice for people who were churning out content to get it read, but my body had a tangible reaction to this kind of advice. I felt myself prickling with frustration because is this really what people are writing for? Page views?

No freaking way. Not in this community.

So the top ten best cocktails for people with diabetes? Fucking sure. Let’s do this, social media-style:

  1. The #DSMA: Take 140 characters, a hashtag, and equal parts honesty and humor and mix them thoroughly in Twitter. Tastes best on Wednesday nights at 9 pm EST.
  2. The Blogosphere: Start with a URL or a Feedreader and slap it into the search bar on your mobile device, tablet, or computer, or Google “diabetes blogs” for a list of ingredients. Mix reading these blogs throughout your day for a boost in diabetes empowerment and community.
  3. The Flaming YouTube: Search through YouTube for diabetes, or “diabetes math,” or “breaking up with diabetes,” or “changing the song on my Animas Ping” and you’ll find a slew of video combinations to add to your playlist. (Title the playlist “Cocktails for Diabetics” and you’ll probably get a lot of search returns, but you’ll also find people who want to be found.)
  4. The Instagrammed: Take your phone, photograph any ol’ diabetes bit or piece in your house, and mix with Instagram to create a frothy, fun mix of Dexcom graphs, race bibs, brave new infusion set sites, Halloween-candy-casually-pretending-to-be-hypo-treatment, and friends who understand.
  5. Facebook Your Face: Take your Facebook account and stir gently with groups, hashtags, and posts about diabetes. It may take a while for this mixture to fully set, but once it does, you’ll have a shot of community you can take in one sitting, or something you can sip on and scroll through for hours.
  6. The Friends for Life: Take one part people with diabetes, one part caregivers, one part educators, one part inspirational athletes, one part Disney World, one part green bracelets, and a billion parts love and throw into a salad shooter and spray that stuff everywhere because in-person diabetes meet-ups and conferences will break your heart and mend it within the course of a week.
  7. The Group Text: No specific ingredients, but a drink best shared with many. And at 3 am.
  8. The Call Me: Best served when low, because a phone call to another PWD who understands is the best way to keep from over-treating.
  9. The Honest-Tea: Equal parts empathy and honesty, this cocktail is a must for people with diabetes who are looking for confirmation that they aren’t alone. It’s not about enabling, but empowering. (Goes really well with a side of Communi-Tea.)
  10. The Hug: Social media is great, but nothing is better than a hug between two people whose much-loved pancreases have taken an extended leave of absence. There is no set ‘best time’ for this cocktail – serve immediately and enjoy.

The one in the middle looks like pee, to me.

People in the diabetes community don’t communicate with one another for page views or Google search prowess. Of course, not everyone’s intentions are the same across the board, and there are people who immerse themselves in a community looking for things that aren’t as altruistic, but the majority of interaction in the DOC, from what I can see, is between people who need each other. That’s why so many of us started doing this, and it’s why so many of us continue.

Because when Google redoes its algorithm and there’s a new system for search engine optimization, when there’s an upheaval in what’s considered the “it” platform for social media, the song remains the same for the DOC. Diabetes, for many, isn’t just in your body but also resides full-time in your head, and managing emotions and support is as essential as insulin (and with a significantly lower copay). It’s not about where the discussions are taking place; it’s about the discussions that are taking place. So “drink” up!

What Does the DOC Mean to You?

Two weeks ago, the #dsma chat was centered on the how and why of people’s participation in the Diabetes Online Community (DOC), and after chat participants shared what brought them to the web for diabetes information, the last question of the night asked them what the DOC means to them.

The answers created a quilt of community and comfort that can’t be denied:

And for me?

Tune in to tonight’s #dsma chat at 9 pm EST. For information on how to get started with Twitter, jump back to this Diabetes and Twitter 101 post.

Drafting Off #DSMA: Diabetes Job Description.

I love tuning in to the diabetes discussions on Twitter – they are always insightful and make me see things through a different (insulin-colored?) lens. The final question of last night’s #dsma chat really brought out some interesting responses:

I wasn’t exactly sure what “position description for life with diabetes” meant, specifically, so I took it as a “job description” of sorts … and one that would vary for everyone:

Looking back, I’m grateful that my learning curve belonged mostly to my parents (which is good because I’m sure it was steep at the outset). Once I was ready to take over the responsibility of diabetes self-care, the disease was embedded solidly into the context of my life and the learning curve became more of a gentle, but constant, slope.

Reading the diverse responses from my fellow PWD on #dsma was an eye-opening experience. That’s what brings me back to #dsma every time, because there’s no set-and-standard answer to any diabetes-related query … we’re all unique and special pancreatically-challenged snowflakes. :)

Jamie summed it up neatly:

To join the diabetes conversation, watch the #dsma hashtag on Twitter on Wednesday nights at 9 pm EST. It’s a great way to wind down your night while building up our community.

What Do You Want to Talk About?

Last night’s #dsma chat was a particularly good one, because its intention was to generate discussion and feedback about what people in the diabetes online community (DOC) want to talk about.

Over the last ten years, the diabetes community has created some effective and supportive roots on (in?) the Internet. We are a vocal and passionate group of people (living with diabetes ourselves or caring for someone touched by diabetes) and the community seems to help people who are looking for their peers, looking to change something, or simply looking to share their stories. No matter what your level of involvement might be, the DOC is a place where you can find your footing.

So this question of “What do you want to talk about?” is a great one because it can help serve the needs/ hit the goals/ scratch the itch.

The evolution of the DOC is constant, and powerful, and we all have a chance to influence and shape it.  What’s important to you?  What do you want to talk about?

(And if you’re looking for more information on how to jump into the #dsma Twitter chats without losing your mind, check out this Diabetes and Twitter 101.)

I’m That Type.

Last night closed out a long week+ of travel, and it closed out with style at the JDRF TypeOneNation Texas event, where I was honored to be a presenter at the conference (talking about balancing diabetesHEY-O! – and getting the most out of your medical appointments).  More on those sessions once I dive into this basin of coffee, but I did want to share one of my favorite visuals from the conference:  this board –>

This was a board where people could write who they were at the conference in support of, and they could share their thoughts on the theme of the conference, which was “I’m the ______ type.”  Fill-in-the-blank sorts of things used to remind me of school, but now they remind me of some of my favorite #dsma chat nights, so watching this board fill up was eye-opening.

Perspectives (and hand writing) varied, but common threads were support and determination.

Mine was, “I’m the never let it define me type.”  But I could have filled that little blue circle out a dozen times with a dozen different answers.  What type are you?



What is a Diabetes Advocate?

Last night’s #dsma chat was a terrific one, focusing on how people in the diabetes community define “advocacy.” I wanted to summarize it here (at least the parts that resonated for me) because it could serve as a catalyst to inspire.

[For information on what the #dsma chat is, click here. And to learn more about connecting with people with diabetes on Twitter, click here.]

The community shared their advocacy “origin stories:”

And then we compared notes on what we’re most passionate about:

… segueing into reasons why that topic is something that touches our advocacy hot spots (sounds sassy …):

But of course, the road towards getting something done is often paved with obstacles. For many of the folks on the chat, “fear” played a huge role in holding us back:

So how do we, as the “diabetes ONLINE community,” remove the Internet component and bring advocacy offline?

Not everyone has to be an advocate for diabetes, and not every advocate raises awareness in the same way. But every voice matters, and no effort is too small. How do you advocate for diabetes? And how can we, as a community, help move your efforts forward?

HCPs and the DOC.

My type 1 diabetes is managed on a day-to-day basis by me.  I do my blood sugar checks, I make insulin decisions that correlate with the food I’m eating or the exercise I’m doing.  I have decided to make an insulin pump, a glucose meter, and a continuous glucose monitor part of my diabetes technology arsenal.

My endocrinologist helps manage my diabetes from a distance, but her input is important in the decision-making process I fumble through every day.  Her recommendations, education, and advice color my choices in debating things like Symlin, having children, clinical trials, etc.  She prescribes the drugs and devices I need/want/should have.  My endocrinologist went to medical school and, in any given week, sees dozens of patients living with diabetes (all types).  She’s (sorry for going full Rhode Island’er on you here) wicked smart.  And she helps put her more global perspective on diabetes in play with my myopic view of this disease, giving me a slate of smart options to think about.

Last night’s #dsma chat was a tough one because it seemed to inadvertently set up healthcare professionals as the “bad guys” and people with diabetes as the “wicked smart” ones.

Whoa, what?  I’d like to assume (and I think correctly so) that the question was more poorly phrased than poorly intentioned.  The discussion should have been about gaps between HCP and PWD communication and about building better HCP/patient relationships, not pitting one side against the other.  But, like it or not, it did open up a heated discussion with Tweets and emails and texts flying.  Paraphrased examples:

“They doesn’t listen to me.” 
“They dismiss the things that I say.”
” They judge me.”
“They don’t care about me.”
“I know more about diabetes than they do.”

Funny thing is, I’ve heard doctors and patients ALIKE say these same phrases.

I have had my share of excellent doctors in my life.  Compassionate, smart, reasonable healthcare professionals who have helped me maintain good health.  Ones who have encouraged my patient empowerment and who have celebrated with me the health I’ve achieved and have maintained.  I’ve also had my share of crummy doctors – apathetic, arrogant, uneducated healthcare professionals who didn’t do anything to move the needle on my well-being (except to potentially push it back).  It’s frustrating as fuck to be under the care of a medical professional who doesn’t seem to care, or who make you question the depth of their diabetes knowledge.

And I’ve been an excellent patient a lot of the time.  I’ve been on time for my appointments and armed with the data my doctor needs to help me make decisions.  I’ve had lists of questions and expectations, and my current medication list handy, and my goals outlined.  I’ve also been a crummy patient plenty of times, one who fuddles through the creation a logbook in the waiting room, with a chip on my shoulder already about the A1C result I know won’t be in-range, frustrated by the fact that my insurance company only covers therapies I don’t like, hating on diabetes and the fact that it makes me sit in more doctor’s office’s than I’d like, and arrogantly viewing my perspectives and needs on diabetes as the only one that’s “right” in that moment.

People are people, doctors and patients alike.  And, like all people, there are good days and bad days and good people and bad people and all the in-between people and moments not carefully structured in this sentence but you know what I mean.

The doctor/patient relationship is a delicate one, and isn’t easily housed by 140 characters, or within the confines of one disease state.  What seems to be missing, from my admittedly oscillating perspective, is respect for all parties on all sides.  I need to be more respectful of my doctor’s time, education, and opinion, and they need to be respectful of the exact same things for me.  One doctor doesn’t make or break my perspectives on how healthcare professionals conduct themselves, just as one patient doesn’t speak for us all.  I am the expert on MY own diabetes care, but there is no way I can claim to be the expert (or even remotely knowledgeable) on all things diabetes.  I have made many mistakes along the way, both in how I manage my diabetes and how I interact with my medical team, but I have to allow myself the chance to learn from those mistakes.  Same goes for my doctor.

This is life with diabetes.  My healthcare team AND I work together on my health.  There’s both an “I” and a “team” in “my diabetes,” and that’s the way I like it.


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