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Posts tagged ‘diabetes’

HypoPedicure.

“Mom, can I [something something] ?”

“Sure, kiddo,” I responded.  But I had no idea what she was asking me – her words were swirling around in the fog of my brain.  My blood sugar was 38 mg/dL and my Dexcom was wailing.  Chris was a few feet away, stirring something on the stove while he kept an eye on his wife.  “My blood sugar is really low, so I’m going to sit here for a few minutes.”

“Okay, that’s fine.  Do you need some glucose tabs?” she asked, sitting on the floor near my feet.

“I already had some.  I’ll be okay in a minute.  Don’t worry.”

What was directly in front of me hard sharp edges of focus, but everything on the peripheral was hard to see.  My body was concentrating on chewing and swallowing and trying to slow down the speed of my heartbeat in my ears.  I knew stable blood sugars were coming, but they needed a glucose jump-start.

“Okay, Mom.  I’ll just do this while I wait.”

And it wasn’t until later that night, after she had gone to bed and once I was readying myself for sleep, that I realized she spent the duration of my hypoglycemic episode painting my toenails bright pink with a glitter topcoat, globs of glitter and pink stretching all the way up to my ankle.

Pros and Cons of Going Gluten-Free. (and a brief lament about the smooshed banana)

It’s been about seven weeks on this “no way, gluten!” lifestyle, and I’m starting to find my footing.  But there are still many pros and cons to balance, so I’m listing them here.  That way, I can look back at this post in a few months and be all, “Pfffft.  Whiner.  You’re in the zone now.”

Here we go – PROS and CONS of Going Gluten-Free in ALL CAPS at times because that’s the only way my brain can operate this morning.

CON:  It’s a pain in the ass, doing this.  Reading food labels for carbohydrate content and grams of sugar in pursuit of better blood sugar control is second nature to me by this point.  After 28 years with type 1 diabetes, I’m comfortable with the carbs.  But trolling labels for that bright, shiny GF logo, or reading through each ingredient to ensure that I’m not inadvertently eating gluten is a new adventure, and one that I find very intrusive.

PRO:  As a result, weight management has been easier lately.  Which I guess is a plus but at the same time, I’m hungry, so I can’t call this a total pro.

CON:  I’m hungry.  (See above.)  All the time.  Mostly because I’m unsure of what to eat, and that insecurity leads me to eat the same things all the time.  Staples like hard boiled eggs, grilled chicken, spinach salad, yogurt, almonds, and every fruit I can get my paws on dominate my days.  Menu items like gluten-free pizza, butternut squash (done with GF ingredients), and chicken soup are being explored, but my natural inclination to be a lazy chef makes this sort of exploration tougher.

PRO:  Eating the same things all the time makes me very familiar with how they map out, blood sugar wise.  So I’m best able to pre-bolus with precision and my post-prandials aren’t gross.  This is boring as eff, but effective for diabetes management.

CON:  Low blood sugars have been really weird lately, especially the ones that follow a visit to the gym.  Before going gluten-free, I’d eat froast or some other glutened up snack to keep my blood sugar steady through cardio (yes, there are other options, but I can’t pretend to have chomped on kale during a run – that would be a big, fat lie and kale hates lies).  Now, I’m erring on the side of fruit and sometimes those sugars get in and out of my system too quickly to hold me for an entire workout.  I’m still figuring out what foods work best to deal with during- and post-exercise hypoglycemia.

PRO:  Glucolift Wildberry tabs are gluten-free.

CON:  Traveling is weird now, too, keeping gluten off my plate.  Airports are not designed for people with dietary needs or preferences, especially little airports like the one I frequent here in Providence.  Finding foods that are gluten-free while on the road is tough, with little exception.  Once I land somewhere, I’m fine, but while in transit, I keep my bag stashed with snacks.

PRO:  I’m learning a lot about what foods travel well.  These gf bars are among my favorites to toss in a backpack, and while they are not as healthy as something fresh, they can stand up to traveling with me and they are more filling than the Southwest pretzels that I can’t eat.

CON:  Bananas do not keep well in backpacks.  They turn brown quickly and often end up smeared on … oh, let’s say the lid of a laptop.

PRO:  I wash my backpack more often than I ever have before, and now it permanently smells like dryer sheets.  Which is a nice contrast to my computer, which smells permanently like bananas now.

CON:  I hate being “that girl.”  The one who asks waitstaff if certain menu options can be made without gluten.  The one who reads labels before taking a bite of anything.  The one who might be mistakenly marked as someone following a “trend diet” instead of someone who is unhappily-but-smartly following through on feedback from her body.  As good as I feel off gluten, I wish I could still eat the stuff and not make waves.

PRO:  I’m learning not to care about feeling slightly embarrassed because DUDE I feel so much better.

“You’re more … you.  The change between then and now is significant,” Chris said the other day.

He’s right.  My mood/disposition/health/everything since kicking gluten out of my diet has been ten steps in the best direction.  All of the non-celiac gluten sensitivity symptoms are gone.  The “head fog” where I would forget what I was doing or what I was about to say has receded.  The numbness and tingling in my hands and wrists is gone.  The ache in my hip joints after running is gone.  I don’t want to spend the afternoon taking a nap on the couch.  My energy is back.  My face is less puffy.  I can chase Birdy without feeling like my feet are in lead boots.  It took months to tune in to how poorly I felt, but now that I’m feeling better, the change is undeniable.

As much as I miss being more carefree about food, a gluten-free diet is the best fit for me.  And after almost three decades of type 1 diabetes, what’s one more food constraint?  So long as coffee and wine remain in the mix, I’m good.

#DOCasksFDA – Your Feedback is Needed, DOC!

THIS IS THE LINK TO THE SURVEYRead below for more information on the virtual discussion between the diabetes community and the FDA, and how your input will shape that discussion, and potentially our future.

“On November 3 from 1pm-4pm EDT, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the diabetes community will host an unprecedented event to discuss unmet needs in diabetes. As a community, our job is to present the numerous challenges we as patients face each day, and we need your opinions to be a part of this discussion! Please fill out this short survey to share your thoughts on what’s important to you when it comes to living with diabetes. Your feedback will go directly to FDA and help influence the conversation on November 3.

Please answer the questions that follow as honestly as you can. Your answers could affect the way the FDA perceives unmet needs in diabetes, and ultimately, how it reviews the risks and benefits of new drugs and devices.”

THIS IS THE LINK TO THE SURVEY AGAIN.  IT IS IN ALL CAPS BECAUSE IT IS IMPORTANT AND YOU ARE IMPORTANT AND YOUR OPINIONS ARE IMPORTANT.  As a community, we need to raise our voices.  Please show the FDA that we are many, we are empowered, and we are loud.

Link coming soon so that you can register for the discussion, but in the meantime, please fill out the survey and share it with your DOC friends.  And thanks!!

Opening a Can of Gluten-Free Pumpkin Whoop Ass.

I’m five-ish weeks into a gluten-free life, and the waah waaaaaah is starting to wear off.  (I can’t pretend to be above the waaah.  Diabetes is such a food-anchored disease, and an additional restriction acts as an extra fun vacuum, sucking the fun out of meals even more.)  But I’m rounding a corner with this new (and admittedly self-imposed, but with good reason) restriction, and it’s time to start branching out.

My mother-in-law is an excellent cook and she gifted America’s Test Kitchen:  How Can It Be Gluten-Free cookbook to Chris and I after learning about our gluten-free leanings.  For a few weeks, I avoided opening it because I was feeling crummy about the transition, but this morning Birdy and I decided to tackle the gluten-free pumpkin bread.

I don’t know what copyright infringements exist when it comes to recipes, so I’m opting to not post the recipe here (I’m scared of the Test Kitchen people), but I will confirm that the bread, although a little bit of a pain in the butt to prepare, was delicious.  IS delicious, because it’s still sitting out on the kitchen counter cooling and the whole house smells terrific.

The bread recipe only called for 1/2 a cup of pumpkin, so we had the majority of a can of pumpkin left over, all nice-smelling and tempting us to make something else.

“COOKIES!!!” yelled Birdy, which is her answer to just about everything.  (A close second to “Why?”)

“Okay, let’s hunt down some cookies that have pumpkin in them,” I replied.

“Why?”

“Because … you just said cookies?”

“Oh yeah.  I forgot.”

Moving on.

We found a gluten-free pumpkin sandwich cookie via Google with these puffy, awesome pumpkin cookies and a cream cheese filling, so have at it we did.  Navigating the gluten-free curve has been interesting, though, because I am learning how many random things have gluten in them.  Like vanilla.  The vanilla in our cupboard is imitation (don’t hate) and according to Chef Google probably contains gluten (and also anal secretions from beavers WTF), so we used the makeshift substitution at the bottom of the recipe of 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon plus 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger, 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg and 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves.

The end result, though visually clumsy, was also delicious.

It’s easier for me to avoid desserts most of the time because eating less junk makes the most sense for me, diabetes-wise.  But for those moments when I’d like to enjoy something sweet, I’m glad there are options that won’t wreck havoc on my body.  Gluten-free doesn’t have to be gross, and I’m slowly learning that fact.

What Influences Blood Sugar? (Hint: Everything.)

“So the food you eat makes your blood sugar go high, right? And the insulin makes it go lower?”

I clearly remember asking this of my certified diabetes educator, way back in the day, as I was trying to make sense of the things that could influence my blood sugar.

It wasn’t until I was a little bit older, with access to different diabetes technologies, that I saw just how many things left their mark on my blood sugar.  This morning, with only emotional stress as an influencer, I watched my blood sugar take the straight road north on my Dexcom graph:

My emotions have their way with my blood sugars all the frigging time.  The math isn’t always repeatable.  Easy morning + healthy breakfast + in-range fasting blood sugar = in range post-breakfast blood sugar.  Stressful morning + diabetes – rational thoughts = rising blood sugar.

Getting the number after the equal sign to remain “in range” takes more work that I’m willing to admit at times.

Diasend: Now With More CGM!?

Is it a glitch?  A misfiring Internet tube?  A mistake that they haven’t realized yet and now I’m that jerk for pointing it out?  WHEN DID THIS HAPPEN?!!

Dexcom data, now available for upload on Diasend.  I don’t know when this changed (last time I looked was over 18 months ago), but it’s working now.  Even here, deep in Rhode Island (can’t go too deep, actually, as it’s a very small state).

After digging through the box of diabetes-related cables that lives in my bathroom cupboard, I can easily upload my glucose meter (Verio Sync), insulin pump (Animas Ping – actually not the easiest upload because it requires dongle dexterity and I can barely say “dongle” without losing it, so being dextrous is extra difficult), and continuous glucose monitor (Dexcom G4).  All my data garbage, dumped into one source.

It’s not streamlined, but it’s closer, and I’ll frigging take it.

(For a list of supported devices, check out this link.  And if you knew Diasend worked with Dexcom for US accounts a long time ago, sorry for being late to the game.  Also, why didn’t you tell me?  I am now VERY EXCITED and the CAPS BUTTON is sort of STUCK.)

Best Intentions Need to Stick.

Yesterday, my bag was packed with all kinds of good intentions.  My CGM sensor was only three day old, on a bright and shiny Toughpad to prevent adhesive rash!  The Dexcom receiver was fully charged!  My CGM in the Cloud rig was all charged up and ready to send my data into the cloud so that I would have a safety net while traveling to Washington, DC for the night.  Extra test strips and a fully charged Verio Sync meter?  I’M ON IT.  My wallet even had a few slips of Opsite Flexifix tape cut into band-aid sized strips and wedged into the change purse, ready to help hold down a wilting sensor.

Much best!  So intentioned!

… which did me zero good when I arrived in DC and my receiver threw a SENSOR FAILED error message after I went to the gym, forcing me to reboot before dinner.  Which meant I went to dinner without a CGM graph, which made me feel like I was sort of flying blind, but then I realized I left my glucose meter in my hotel room so I was actually flying blind without any way to check my blood sugar or calibrate my CGM during the meal.

… and then, sometime during the night, the sensor came loose and fell off my thigh.

All these good intentions? They need to STICK.

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