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Posts tagged ‘diabetes’

#DOCasksFDA – Your Feedback is Needed, DOC!

THIS IS THE LINK TO THE SURVEYRead below for more information on the virtual discussion between the diabetes community and the FDA, and how your input will shape that discussion, and potentially our future.

“On November 3 from 1pm-4pm EDT, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the diabetes community will host an unprecedented event to discuss unmet needs in diabetes. As a community, our job is to present the numerous challenges we as patients face each day, and we need your opinions to be a part of this discussion! Please fill out this short survey to share your thoughts on what’s important to you when it comes to living with diabetes. Your feedback will go directly to FDA and help influence the conversation on November 3.

Please answer the questions that follow as honestly as you can. Your answers could affect the way the FDA perceives unmet needs in diabetes, and ultimately, how it reviews the risks and benefits of new drugs and devices.”

THIS IS THE LINK TO THE SURVEY AGAIN.  IT IS IN ALL CAPS BECAUSE IT IS IMPORTANT AND YOU ARE IMPORTANT AND YOUR OPINIONS ARE IMPORTANT.  As a community, we need to raise our voices.  Please show the FDA that we are many, we are empowered, and we are loud.

Link coming soon so that you can register for the discussion, but in the meantime, please fill out the survey and share it with your DOC friends.  And thanks!!

Opening a Can of Gluten-Free Pumpkin Whoop Ass.

I’m five-ish weeks into a gluten-free life, and the waah waaaaaah is starting to wear off.  (I can’t pretend to be above the waaah.  Diabetes is such a food-anchored disease, and an additional restriction acts as an extra fun vacuum, sucking the fun out of meals even more.)  But I’m rounding a corner with this new (and admittedly self-imposed, but with good reason) restriction, and it’s time to start branching out.

My mother-in-law is an excellent cook and she gifted America’s Test Kitchen:  How Can It Be Gluten-Free cookbook to Chris and I after learning about our gluten-free leanings.  For a few weeks, I avoided opening it because I was feeling crummy about the transition, but this morning Birdy and I decided to tackle the gluten-free pumpkin bread.

I don’t know what copyright infringements exist when it comes to recipes, so I’m opting to not post the recipe here (I’m scared of the Test Kitchen people), but I will confirm that the bread, although a little bit of a pain in the butt to prepare, was delicious.  IS delicious, because it’s still sitting out on the kitchen counter cooling and the whole house smells terrific.

The bread recipe only called for 1/2 a cup of pumpkin, so we had the majority of a can of pumpkin left over, all nice-smelling and tempting us to make something else.

“COOKIES!!!” yelled Birdy, which is her answer to just about everything.  (A close second to “Why?”)

“Okay, let’s hunt down some cookies that have pumpkin in them,” I replied.

“Why?”

“Because … you just said cookies?”

“Oh yeah.  I forgot.”

Moving on.

We found a gluten-free pumpkin sandwich cookie via Google with these puffy, awesome pumpkin cookies and a cream cheese filling, so have at it we did.  Navigating the gluten-free curve has been interesting, though, because I am learning how many random things have gluten in them.  Like vanilla.  The vanilla in our cupboard is imitation (don’t hate) and according to Chef Google probably contains gluten (and also anal secretions from beavers WTF), so we used the makeshift substitution at the bottom of the recipe of 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon plus 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger, 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg and 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves.

The end result, though visually clumsy, was also delicious.

It’s easier for me to avoid desserts most of the time because eating less junk makes the most sense for me, diabetes-wise.  But for those moments when I’d like to enjoy something sweet, I’m glad there are options that won’t wreck havoc on my body.  Gluten-free doesn’t have to be gross, and I’m slowly learning that fact.

What Influences Blood Sugar? (Hint: Everything.)

“So the food you eat makes your blood sugar go high, right? And the insulin makes it go lower?”

I clearly remember asking this of my certified diabetes educator, way back in the day, as I was trying to make sense of the things that could influence my blood sugar.

It wasn’t until I was a little bit older, with access to different diabetes technologies, that I saw just how many things left their mark on my blood sugar.  This morning, with only emotional stress as an influencer, I watched my blood sugar take the straight road north on my Dexcom graph:

My emotions have their way with my blood sugars all the frigging time.  The math isn’t always repeatable.  Easy morning + healthy breakfast + in-range fasting blood sugar = in range post-breakfast blood sugar.  Stressful morning + diabetes – rational thoughts = rising blood sugar.

Getting the number after the equal sign to remain “in range” takes more work that I’m willing to admit at times.

Diasend: Now With More CGM!?

Is it a glitch?  A misfiring Internet tube?  A mistake that they haven’t realized yet and now I’m that jerk for pointing it out?  WHEN DID THIS HAPPEN?!!

Dexcom data, now available for upload on Diasend.  I don’t know when this changed (last time I looked was over 18 months ago), but it’s working now.  Even here, deep in Rhode Island (can’t go too deep, actually, as it’s a very small state).

After digging through the box of diabetes-related cables that lives in my bathroom cupboard, I can easily upload my glucose meter (Verio Sync), insulin pump (Animas Ping – actually not the easiest upload because it requires dongle dexterity and I can barely say “dongle” without losing it, so being dextrous is extra difficult), and continuous glucose monitor (Dexcom G4).  All my data garbage, dumped into one source.

It’s not streamlined, but it’s closer, and I’ll frigging take it.

(For a list of supported devices, check out this link.  And if you knew Diasend worked with Dexcom for US accounts a long time ago, sorry for being late to the game.  Also, why didn’t you tell me?  I am now VERY EXCITED and the CAPS BUTTON is sort of STUCK.)

Best Intentions Need to Stick.

Yesterday, my bag was packed with all kinds of good intentions.  My CGM sensor was only three day old, on a bright and shiny Toughpad to prevent adhesive rash!  The Dexcom receiver was fully charged!  My CGM in the Cloud rig was all charged up and ready to send my data into the cloud so that I would have a safety net while traveling to Washington, DC for the night.  Extra test strips and a fully charged Verio Sync meter?  I’M ON IT.  My wallet even had a few slips of Opsite Flexifix tape cut into band-aid sized strips and wedged into the change purse, ready to help hold down a wilting sensor.

Much best!  So intentioned!

… which did me zero good when I arrived in DC and my receiver threw a SENSOR FAILED error message after I went to the gym, forcing me to reboot before dinner.  Which meant I went to dinner without a CGM graph, which made me feel like I was sort of flying blind, but then I realized I left my glucose meter in my hotel room so I was actually flying blind without any way to check my blood sugar or calibrate my CGM during the meal.

… and then, sometime during the night, the sensor came loose and fell off my thigh.

All these good intentions? They need to STICK.

Twenty-Eight and Thirteen.

Twenty-eight years ago, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. It’s a moment in time that is so jumbled up with other things – my grandfather had been in a horrible car accident a few months prior to my diagnosis, my older cousin died in a car accident just after my diagnosis – there are memories of people in my family crying and there were so many reasons.  Vague memories of being in Rhode Island Hospital for two weeks, the kid with the spider bite, and practicing injections on an orange serve as markers on the timeline of my diagnosis, but clear memories don’t exist.

Diabetes has always been there.  It doesn’t get easier with time, but it does become more routine and less mentally intrusive.  Either that, or I’ve just become used to the intrusion.

I remember September 11, 2001 very clearly.  I was working in a bank in Newport, RI right near the naval base.  It was my first job after college, and the first plane hit the WTC as I was driving over the Newport Bridge to work.  My coworkers told me about the first plane when I arrived at the bank.  The security guard at the bank told us when the second plane hit.  I remember calling my father because I didn’t know what else to do, and he told me it was going to be okay.  His voice was calm.  Despite his inability to actually influence the events that were unfolding across the country, his words were reassuring and made me feel safe.

I feel very lucky that I didn’t experience personal loss on that day.  My heart goes out to those who did.

The nation is in mourning and I mourn with my country.  Simultaneously, I mark the anniversary of my diabetes diagnosis. I always think about people whose birthdays are on September 11th, or whose wedding anniversaries are September 11th.  I think about the people who lost so much on September 11, 2001. It’s a day where I feel conflicted thinking about diabetes, but it’s impossible not to apply personal bias to life.

I think it’s a day to close the damn computer.  To not read every news article and overwhelmingly sad bit of news being shared.  It feels like a day to be present, to remember to live.

 

So Many Things!

A Friday Six on a Wednesday!  Because why the hell not.

The FitBit obsession.

Renza talks about the messaging of diabetes, and what we can do to get it right.

Here is some damn sneaky research.

Seb is still running. And I’m still supporting the hell out of him, because he’s incredibly dedicated. You can still support him, too.

I am having the hardest time not filling our home with everything Murray, by way of Derek Eads.

“It’s a day to remember those who were lost. For me it’s a reminder that I’m lucky to be alive.”  Amazing post from Carly about a medical emergency on 9/11.

Are you in the Los Angeles area?  Diabetes Sisters is coming to LA on October 24th, and I’ll be part of the event, alongside some of my favorite DOC people (Hi Cherise, Manny, and George!).  Hope to see you there!

That same weekend, up in Anaheim, CA, the Children With Diabetes team will be holding a Focus on Technology conference.  There will be a whole session on setting up your CGM in the Cloud rig – don’t miss it!

Coming Together as a Community – a great piece from diaTribe’s editor-in-chief Kelly Close.

There is no such thing as a “free food.”  Sort of.  New column at Animas.

“today, i felt parts of the monster within myself.  today, i felt parts of the hero within myself.”  Excellent post from Heather Gabel about the activated patient.

THE SEA OF TREES found its way into People Magazine last week.

And these – THESE VIDEOS ARE AMAZING.  Melissa, you are the Weird Al of the DOC.  :)

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