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Posts tagged ‘diabetes data’

Verio Sync: Unanticipated Glitch.

The Verio Sync meter and I have been happy friends for a few years now, starting back in late 2013.  (Here’s that first post, with disclosures aplenty. Second impressions are here.)  

I honestly can’t figure out why more people aren’t using this meter.  It’s fast, it’s accurate, and the Reveal app is awesome.  This meter has been the best fit for me in the last few years, which is a big statement because I historically revolt against excessive change when it comes to diabetes tech.

Bottom line:  I like this meter.  Quite a bit.

Footnote on bottom line:  Until last week, when I tried to upload my information to the app, which had been recently  updated on my phone, which meant the app needed all of my information again, only to realize that the PIN had worn off my meter and I couldn’t enter it into the app.

Holy run-on sentence, but the end result is no PIN?  No upload.  No upload?  No data access.

Pain in the ass, that is.  Had I known, I would not have updated the app on my phone.  Had I known, I would have written the PIN down on a piece of paper.

But wait a second … I was just at Joslin with my endocrinologist, and she was able to plug my meter into her computer and upload my data.  No PIN, no hassle.  She had some magical data system that siphoned my health data into their files.  How come my doctor can access my data but I can’t?

The guy who talked to me for ages on the One Touch customer service line was very nice, and very helpful, only ultimately couldn’t do anything other than offer to send me a new meter (which still has not arrived).

“You’ll receive a shipping label to return the old meter,”  he mentioned.

“Can I wait a few weeks to return it?  I want to see if my doctor can get the data off that meter before I send it back.  I want those numbers, if I can get them,” I asked.

“Sure thing.  Not a problem.”

So he was very nice.  But the underlying problem here is that the data on that meter is mine.  My glucose data, generated every morning, every time I eat, and every night before bed.  It’s the specifics of my diabetes day, dictating the content of my dinner plate and influencing the integrity of my CGM sensor.  That information is mine.  And yet my doctor has the key to open access but I do not.  She has a “pro” account but I’m managing my disease daily, and yet I can’t access my own data from my own machine.

This doesn’t make sense. It’s my data! This problem can be fixed once patients are given the tools to manage their condition, instead of information being held behind a wall of medical privilege. You know … once we’re viewed as “pros,” too.

UPDATE: Lifescan called me a few minutes ago. Here’s the rundown:

Animas Vibe: A Few Weeks Later.

Again, disclosure:  I work with Animas and have a sponsorship contract.  Here are more details on my disclosures. And this is the Mr. Plow theme song.  Mr. Plow would be great, about now, since the snow keeps dumping down outside.

It’s been several weeks since I’ve switched to the Animas Vibe insulin pump (with integrated CGM technology – doesn’t that sound like a rehearsed phrase?  How about “insulin thing with CGM thing built in and have you seen my coffee, pleaseandthankyou.”), and I thought I’d take a crack at some second impressions, since the first impressions were only compiled after a few days.

Talking ‘Bout CGM:  I am still into the concept and application of having one device that does the work of two.  While the Vibe still requires that I wear an insulin pump infusion set and a CGM sensor as two separate insertions, it removes the need for an external CGM receiver.  I wrote about this last time, but to reiterate:  I am okay with not using the separate receiver.  I’ve traveled a lot in the last few weeks and the first few trips, I brought along my CGM receiver so I could plug it into the SHARE port.

For the record, I still haven’t upgraded to the 505 software.  Judge all you want.  🙂  Which may explain my identical CGM graphs.  (And, also for the record, I’m really, really excited to see the new Dexcom receiver.  That may change how I feel about clouding, as it would be much simpler.)

But then Chris and I came to realize that we aren’t good at this whole “data sharing” thing.  As much as it sounds like a good plan in theory, we aren’t good at the application of it.  I think this becomes a patient-specific preference sort of thing, and for this PWD, I’m not a data-sharer.  But as I mentioned with that previous dead horse that I keep flogging, I like options.  Love them, actually.  And anything that gives data options – LIFE options – to people touched by diabetes, I am all for it.

(That sentence was a grammatical nightmare.  Ignore the sloppy parts and move on, yes?)

DiasendYesterday, for the first time in a long time, I downloaded (uploaded? loaded.) my data to Diasend.

The data collection portion is cumbersome.  I hate dongles and charging cords and all the extra beeps and wires required to make sense of diabetes data.  (Which is why I’m such a fan of the Verio Sync idea, which uses bluetooth technology to automagically suck the results off my meter and spit them into my iPhone, but there are issues with that system, too, because it’s only iOS compatible.  Pluses in one way, minuses in another.  But see aforementioned “I love options” sentiment, because it still applies.)  But I did download my pump data, which also downloaded my CGM data.  And, because I was feeling ambitious, I uploaded my glucose meter, too.

So this was my first time looking at Diasend with information about my insulin doses, glucose meter results, and CGM results on the same screen.  (No, I am not sharing my results.  My numbers have been absolute shit lately and I’m not going to pepper my blog with confirmation that I have diabetes.  I’ll let the c-peptide test that’s required by my insurance in order to cover my insulin pump serve as that confirmation.  Yes, that’s a thing.  Yes, more on that later.)

Diasend is good for granular information, but the information on the “compilation” tab was ace for me.  Seeing my blood sugar averages based on time of day was powerful.  (I have midnight to 11 am nailed and awesome.  Everything not in that time frame needs a solid snuggle these days.)   As a Mac user who hasn’t explored the new Dexcom/Mac Portrait (I’m woefully behind on everything that doesn’t involve Birdy these days), seeing my Dexcom data on my laptop is amazing.  I’ll be exploring Portrait in the next few days but in the meantime, I’m happy that information can be siphoned over to Diasend.  And it puts the constant flow of data into digestible context.

Pump Stuff.  Since I was a Ping user before, using the Vibe feels familiar and easy.  I’m still glad this sucker is waterproof and the button clicking process is familiar to me.  All of that feels the same.  One thing I have noticed is that the more my CGM needs attention, the faster the battery in my pump needs replacing.  This is annoying, but makes sense despite the annoyance.  For the first time ever, I’ve invested in lithium batteries for my pump and it seems to hold much better than the alkaline ones I have been using for the last … forever.  But overall, the pump feels familiar and comfortable, and since I hate change, that familiarity is a plus for me.

Alarms, for whatever reason, remain easier to hear and feel when they are coming from the pump.  This was a huge concern of mine because I thought the pump alarms would be muffled by clothes and bedding, making them hard to catch.  But I actually respond to low and high alarms more readily on the Vibe.  I am not sure why.  Maybe because it’s attached to my hip and I feel the vibration?

What remains to be seen is how the changing state of Dexcom progress will affect my feelings about this pump.  Right now, it’s the only one integrated with the CGM I already use, so that’s a huge plus.  But I am concerned about the fact that the software in the Vibe is already behind on the current Dexcom system.  I know the FDA process creates hurdles that are hard to clear, but since the Vibe has already cleared the Big One, can I expect that updates and upgrades will come fast and furious?  As a PWD using the Animas product, I hope this is the case.

And lastly, I’m hoping to have this pump covered by my insurance company.  I’m still trying to get a c-peptide test done (travel, snow, and issues with fasting) to fulfill the requirements issued by Blue Cross Blue Shield, so that journey remains ongoing.

Thankfully, I’m still pretty effing sure I have diabetes.   So yay?  Yay.

Dexcom Rash.

The itch started back in July 2012, when I pulled off a Dexcom sensor and saw a prickly, hive-ish rash underneath where the sensor and transmitter had been placed.  Blaming it on the summer heat and the recycled, dry air of airplane cabins, I figured it was a one-time thing and I’d be sorted out on the following sensor placement.

Which ended up being an “oh hell no – here’s a big, fat rash from the adhesive” experience instead.  I don’t know what changed (the adhesive? my body’s chemistry? my skin sloughed off overnight and was replaced by Super Sensitive Skin?), but I do know that I need to take some extra precautions to this day in order to comfortably wear my Dexcom sensor.

A search phrase that leads folks to SUM is often “Dexcom rash,” so I wanted to make sure that information was easily findable.  Not being able to wear the Dexcom due to adhesive reaction/allergy was frustrating, so if this information can help make life easier for PWD who want CGM data, I’m all in.

Here is some decidedly NON-MEDICAL, ANECDOTAL (talk to your doctor before making any changes to your medical regimen, please and thank you) solutions aimed at avoiding the Dexcom rash.

I’ve used a few different methods to help keep the Dexcom stuck, or to avoid the rash, but the regimen that has been tried-and-true and actually working for the last year and a half is this:

  • After showering, make sure the skin is completely dry.
  • In the colder months, when the air is dry and the heat in the house makes my skin particularly sensitive, I spray a blast or two of steroid inhaler on my skin where the sensor is to be placed.  This is a method I learned about from a reader, and discussed with my endocrinologist before trying.  She thought I was bananas, but she gave me the go-ahead anyway.
  • After applying the inhaler blast (but in mild weather, without applying it), I placed a Johnson & Johnson Tough Pad against my skin.  (It’s like a thick, gel-ish bandaid.)
  • I stick the Dexcom sensor over the Tough Pad (so that none of the sensor adhesive is touching my skin) and insert the sensor straight through the Tough Pad.
  • Then it’s business as usual – stick the transmitter in and start up the receiver!

Usually I can get the recommended seven days without having any kind of skin flare up, and when the sensor starts to peel away prematurely, I stick some Opsite Flexifix tape onto the loose bits to keep things stuck.

And that’s it.  It’s not medical advice, but it is a way to bypass the potential rash and to continue use of a medical device I rely on to help keep me safe.  I hate itching … unless it’s that advocacy itch.

[Disclosure page]

 

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