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Posts tagged ‘dexcom’

Free Shower.

(to the tune of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ Free Fallin’)

He’s a good pump, does his job well
Loves priming and bolusing too.
He’s a good pump, crazy ‘bout islets
Gives insulin when those islets don’t come through.

It’s a long week being my Dex sensor
There’s adhesive workin’ while I play
And I’m a happy girl cause I don’t even miss them
I’m a happy girl on site change day

And I’m free, free showerin’
Yeah I’m free, free showerin’

All devices are sitting on my counter
Going nowhere until I put them on my bod.
And all the good pumps are taking their short leave
And all the good sensors are still in plastic sleeves

‘Cause I’m free, free showerin’
Yeah I’m free, free showerin’

Free showerin’, now I’m free showerin’
Now I’m free showerin’, now I’m free showerin’

I’m gonna dry off and refill my cartridge
I’m gonna peel back adhesive tapey rings
I’m gonna free shower but then when it’s over
I’ll reconnect with these live-saving things.

For now I’m free, free showerin’
Yeah I’m free, free showerin’

Yeah I’m free, free showerin’
Oh! Free showerin’
Now I’m free
Oh!
Free showerin’

Dexcom Adhesive, Activated!

Nothing to see here, especially if you’re looking for an adhesive-related Dexcom rash. Because ever since switching to the sensors that expire after 8/17/17, the rash is a thing of the past.

Now I can wear my sensors for the recommended seven days (sometimes stretching it a day or two here and there, if I’m feeling bold), and my skin is fine when I remove the thing.

Great joy! YAY!!!!

However, if I add any Opsite Flexifix tape, that’s suddenly causing an irritation. It’s like the reverse of what was happening for years.  So.  Close.

But it’s awesome to be adhesive itch-free after almost five years of scratchy-scratch.  Life without blistering skin reactions, Toughpads, and welts that last for over a week is so much nicer.

The only downside to the new post-08/15/17 expiration sensors is that the adhesive itself seems to be weaker.  For the first time in years, I had a sensor go loose and yawn off my skin after 10 hours of wear.

A quick call to the Dexcom customer care team was quick to replace this sensor, thankfully.  And I learned something random on the phone call.

“Are you pressing down on the sensor adhesive after application?” the customer service guy asked.

“Yes, I am.”

“Oh good.  That helps activate the sensor adhesive,” he said.

“It activates it?”

“Yes, and that’s what helps it stay stuck.”

Huh.  I’d only heard that once before (earlier in the day, from Abby in the instagram comments section), but apparently it’s true.  In order to DEXCOM ADHESIVE, ACTIVATE!, you need to press down on the adhesive part.  Is that common knowledge or just instinctively done by most Dexcom users?  For me, it was just something I did without thinking, kind of like riding a bike.

tl;dr – The rash is gone. Make sure you press on your sensor adhesive.  Write a blog post about it once in a while to confirm that the rash is still MIA.  And long live sensors that expire after 08/15/17!

Your moop or mine?

The first flight out was jumbly, with the plane riding into some kind of air pocket right after takeoff, eliciting audible screams from some of us.  (No, not from me.  Turns out that, if things get scary, I resort to frantically saying the F word under my breath whilst clutching the arm rest.)  Once the plane hit some smooth air, everyone breathed a little easier and tried to mellow out.

In the silence of folks calming down, I heard that low, moop sound that the Dexcom G5 app makes when it is ready to be calibrated, like the sonar ping from a submarine.  It’s subtle but unmistakable.

Moop.

My sensor was fine when I boarded the plane.  I pulled out my phone anyway, just to make sure my CGM wasn’t crying for attention.  Huh.  Not me.  Sliding the phone back into my purse, my peripheral vision caught the movements of the woman next to me, who had her phone in hand and I could see the little pigeon head I knew by heart.

“Type 1?”

She grinned.  “Yeah.”

“Me, too.  Since I was seven.”

“I was 13.”

“I thought it was my CGM that needed to be calibrated,” I said, gesturing towards my phone.  “But it was you this time.”


It’s the thread that runs through all of us, that instant and unfettered understanding of the thing that simmers on the back burner some days and threatens to burn the house down on others.  I know that feeling. So did the woman next to me.

Instantly, she became familiar. I didn’t know her name or where she lived or what kind of history she brought on board with her, but there was an instant connection of, “Yeah, me too. I know that thing you have. I also moop.  And beep. And check. And worry. And celebrate. And dose. And fight. And laugh. And keep perspective. And move on.”

The Follow Up About Dexcom.

Today is Day 7.  I’ll be pulling this sensor off in six hours.

Day 7. No filter. No rash. No worries. #dexcom

A post shared by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

No rash.  No filter.  Does this mean no worries?

(For reference, this post is a follow up from a week ago when I put on a Dexcom G5 sensor and transmitter without a barrier underneath the sensor.  For the last four and a half years, I’ve had an allergic/irritation response to the sensor.  Big, scaly rashes would blister up and take weeks to heal … like the one currently on my left thigh.  But rumor had it that sensors with an expiration date past 8/17/2017 were not causing this rash reaction.  

So I tried a 11/2017 expiration-dated sensor and the result?  No rash. NO RASH! The only issue I noticed was some blood around the transmitter after inserting it, but I wonder if that happens more often than I realize and the Toughpad had previously kept the blood from being visible. Whatever the case, I’m not itchy yet and I’m really, really hopeful that this rash issue is tabled forever. Next question is what to do with the box of sensors that has a pre-August 2017 expiration date …)

The One About Expiration Dates.

On the Dexcom and Libre Rash Facebook group, I saw a note posted back in December from someone referencing sensors with an expiration date after August 17, 2017.

“Dex recently changed their mfg process to eliminate a substance that caused rashes in some. Get some expiration date AFTER 8/15/17 …”

Huh.  Interesting.  (Read: HOLY SHIT COULD THIS BE TRUE??!!) I’ve been experiencing a Dexcom adhesive rash since 2012 and despite many conversations with clinicians and diabetes device industry specialists, no one has a solution for this issue.  (No one openly acknowledges this issue, either, which I find weird.)  For several years, I thought I was the only one having a rash reaction to the sensor adhesive, but then the Facebook group popped up and holy shit, there are a lot of us.  (The group currently has over 1900 members.)

Since 2012, I’ve tried several workarounds for this rash issue.  Steroid inhaler spray, barrier tapes, the blessed JnJ Toughpad … nothing eliminates the rash completely but the Toughpad does the best job of giving me seven days of sensor wear.  Fine.  The data and protection I get from using a CGM is worth the itch.  (See also: two solid pregnancies, two healthy kids, an A1C I’m happy with, and a marked decrease in overnight hypoglycemic events.  See also also:  “hypoglycemic events” is a stupid name)

Expiration investigation.

A post shared by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

My previous sensor shipment has an expiration date of August 7, 2017.  The shipment I received last week expires in November 2017.  Even though I have a couple August expiration sensors left to use, I’m skipping ahead.  I want to know if the rumors are true.

New one goes in in a few hours.  Here’s hoping.

 

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