Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Food Reminders.

“Half a cup?  Let me get the measuring cups,” my mom would say, foraging around in her purse for the ubiquitous set of measuring cups she toted around.

She always knew what  “half a cup” looked like because she didn’t guess.  Her management of my diabetes was precise when she was in charge, back in the day.

I am admittedly not so precise. At diabetes camp, I knew exactly what “half a cup” of coleslaw looked like because we were forced to eat everything on our plates (rules and regulations of diabetes camp in the early 90′s).  And when I was pregnant, I measured the hell out of everything out of fear of blood sugars over 180 mg/dL.  But in the ebb and flow of regular, non-specific life, I forget what half a cup looks like.  Is that size portion supposed to be closer to a pack of cards or a baseball?  (I kept writing that as “pack of carbs.”  Appropriate.)  Is half a cup supposed to fill 1/4 of my plate or more like 1/3 and what if it’s mashed cauliflower – does that mean half a cup is more of a loose estimate – and if it’s mashed potatoes, if I spread it around with my fork, is it like half a cup gains more surface area and thereby the carb count is diminished?

Logic isn’t my strong suit.  What works for me is reminding myself every few months what proper portion sizes actually look like, using measuring cups and scales and taking a few minutes to actually portion things out properly.

I tried to do this the other day, but realized that the measuring cups we received for our wedding were so worn that the measurement specifics weren’t legible anymore.

“Is this the half cup?  Or the third?”  I asked Chris.

He leaned over.  “I think that’s a tablespoon?”

So, for starters, we bought some new measuring cups.  And for the last few weeks, I’ve been trying to refresh my portion size memories.  For some of my go-to foods, like hard-boiled eggs, avocado, and chicken, I’m not worried by the “how much?” quandary, but this reminder helps a LOT for higher carb foods like pasta and fruit.  (The banana conundrum forever haunts me – “one banana” is usually the noted serving size, but bananas range from five inches to like fifteen inches, so which size is best and does size matter that much when it comes to bananas and also get your mind out of the gutter.)

Knowing proper serving sizes helps me better SWAG (scientific wild-ass guess) bolus, which helps me make better diabetes decisions and improves my blood sugar outcomes.  Blah, blah, blah, right?  I just wanted another excuse to use the picture of Siah in a banana.

 

What is a Diabetes Advocate?

Last night’s #dsma chat was a terrific one, focusing on how people in the diabetes community define “advocacy.” I wanted to summarize it here (at least the parts that resonated for me) because it could serve as a catalyst to inspire.

[For information on what the #dsma chat is, click here. And to learn more about connecting with people with diabetes on Twitter, click here.]

The community shared their advocacy “origin stories:”

And then we compared notes on what we’re most passionate about:

… segueing into reasons why that topic is something that touches our advocacy hot spots (sounds sassy …):

But of course, the road towards getting something done is often paved with obstacles. For many of the folks on the chat, “fear” played a huge role in holding us back:

So how do we, as the “diabetes ONLINE community,” remove the Internet component and bring advocacy offline?

Not everyone has to be an advocate for diabetes, and not every advocate raises awareness in the same way. But every voice matters, and no effort is too small. How do you advocate for diabetes? And how can we, as a community, help move your efforts forward?

Happy Holidays!

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from my family to yours!!

Talking About Complications.

I wanted to share a link to this month’s diaTribe column, because it touches upon a topic I feel strongly about: discussions about diabetes-related complications.  I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes twenty-seven years ago, but with macular edema more recently, and am learning every day about the influence of stigma and fear on my own diabetes management.

Complications happen, and discussions about them shouldn’t be relegated to whispered fears in the bedroom after the lights are turned out. The language around complications needs to change from one of fault and guilt to that of perseverance and renewed hope. We, as a patient community, have the right to disclose our diabetes complications without being blanketed – and suffocated – by judgment. If a complication becomes part of our personal healthcare spectrum, we need to feel empowered to face this new health issue with confidence that there is life after this diagnosis, too. We should be met, by health care professionals and fellow patients alike, with the support and encouragement we need to not lose the reins on good health habits, and to be inspired to make new ones part of our regimen.”

Thanks for popping over to diaTribe to give the column a read, and I’d love to hear your thoughts on diabetes complications and the language they are surrounded by.

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

European Blogger Summit: Photo.

The time zone shuffle isn’t doing much for me, in terms of finding words to describe this meeting and Internet to send out those words, so for now I have a photo of the amazing fellow PWD I’ve had the pleasure of seeing here at EASD, and a big thanks to them for doing all the work they do.

Loopy.

“Siah looks lonely.  She needs a friend,” said my daughter.  “Let’s get a cat and name it Loopy?”

Welcome to the family, Loopy.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers