Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Diabetes Products’ Category

Second Impressions: Dexcom G5 Mobile.

Disclosure Up Front (where it should be)I have a relationship with Dexcom that includes receiving my continuous glucose supplies at no cost.  More details are outlined here on my disclosures page, but please know that the bias I’m bringing to this is pretty significant, not simply because of the working relationship with Dexcom but also the fact that this CGM has been part of my diabetes care plan since 2006, so I’m in deep for a dozen different reasons.  If you have any questions, feel free to reach out.

It’s been about a month since suiting up with the Dexcom G5 (upgrading from the previous G4 iteration) and so far, the transition has been way less jarring than I had anticipated.  Here are some second impressions:

The Parts I Like:

I was initially concerned about phone battery life, but I haven’t seen any significant change since switching to G5.  (Must be noted:  I upgraded my iPhone two weeks before starting on the G5, so any battery improvement was a big deal after switching from the iPhone 5s, which would eek down to 80% an hour after unplugging.  Also, I didn’t realize until very recently that you can double-click the home button to bring up all active apps and then close said active apps.  These two changes have improved my phone battery life exponentially.)  But having the phone as the sole data receiver has made me fastidious about bringing a back-up battery charger everywhere I go.  Which is not a new thing, but now feels like a necessary thing.

I had doubts about using the G5 on an airplane, as well, until I remembered that Bluetooth can remain active even when a phone is in airplane mode.  I’ve had a chance to test out the G5 while traveling a few times now and the phone makes a fine receiver even when it can’t make phone calls.  This was a relief.

I haven’t traveled outside of the US yet with the G5, but I’ll be headed to Vancouver for the IDF conference this afternoon, so I’ll have a few days to see how the G5 does when my cell phone has no service.  (I’m guessing Share will be out of commission unless I’m connected to wifi.  Filed under:  No shit, Sparling.)

I really dig the Dexcom Clarity application on my computer.  I know this isn’t new with the G5, but I’ve only been using Clarity since upgrading to the G5, and it’s very nice to see the data living happily on that system.  I like the A1C predictor thing, but have found it a bit fickle.  (“Your A1C looks great today!” … three days later … “Your A1C is crap.  Go directly to jail.”)  I’m still waiting to hear what my actual blood-draw A1C is, so I can’t compare the estimation to the lab work, but I’m curious to see how close those two numbers are.

Accuracy-wise, the G5 does seem to be an improvement.  The data is spot-frigging-on with my Verio Sync results.  No complaints there.

The Parts That Could Use a Shift:

I also don’t like that the alarms on the Share are exactly the same as those on the Dexcom app.  This works great for people like Chris, who follows my Dexcom data through the Share app, but for me, I am responding to my personal alarms and the alarms for the people who Share with me.  I would like the ability to change the alarm noises on my Share app so that when a low alarm goes off, I am positive it’s mine.  In the last month, I’ve treated two lows that were not mine because I responded to the alarm noise instead of checking to see which PWD was actually low.  This is a problem unique to PWD who follow other PWD on Share, but it’s making me feel daft and changing the sound would be an upgrade.

The transmitter is bigger than the G4 one.  I was not as irritated by this as I thought I would be, but when I wear the sensor on my arm, it’s very sticky-outty, and I don’t like more space being dedicated to diabetes devices.  It would be awesome to have the transmitter the size of the G4 one.  Or the size of a grain of rice.  The transmitter also claims to work for three months (instead of the six promised by the G4, which actually ended up being more like 8 months), which means I need to order new transmitters more often.  That adds one more item to the constant “to do” list of diabetes supply crap.

The G5 sensors are the same as the G4 sensors, which means the adhesive is the same as before, which means I am allergic to it.  Toughpads are still required under ever sensor, for me, and with winter almost here, my skin is starting to have its seasonal freak-out.  (The rash is not unique. There is a Facebook group with almost 500 members in it that are comparing ways to mitigate the itch.  Come on, Dexcom — find a way to update your adhesive with as much speed as you’ve done with your data transmission.)

I use an Animas Vibe insulin pump and the G5 does not transmit data to that pump.  So if my phone dies, I can’t switch over to the Vibe as my receiver.  I look forward to when the pumps integrated with Dexcom upgrade their abilities to work with G5.  Until then, it’s annoying to take one step forward with Dexcom while standing completely still with insulin pump technology.

The Parts That Remain the Same:

I never thought I’d see streaming glucose data.  I’m so grateful that I have access to this data because this is the kind of real-time safety net my parents were hopeful for back when I was diagnosed.  I’m sorry they weren’t able to take advantage of it then, but I’m glad it’s here now.

Because otherwise, what would wake me up all night long?  The cats?  That’s so 2005.

Bionic Pancreas Update and Call to Action.

A few weeks ago, I met with Ed Damiano and we spent an afternoon talking about recent developments in the bionic pancreas program and what’s up next.

“Here’s our new device,” he said, placing the iLet on his desk, inadvertently putting it right next to his cell phone, which didn’t look much bigger/thicker by comparison.  (I asked for a quarter for comparison, because otherwise this thing could look as small as a whisper, or as big as a toaster, depending on how you feel about devices that day.)

“It’s pretty.  In that device sort of way.  So this is the single device, right?  No more two pumps, one CGM receiver, etc?”

“Yes.  We have two different cartridges in this single device – one for insulin, one for glucagon – that will absolutely not fit in the wrong way.  You can’t make a mistake; there’s no cross-channeling.  The cartridges are already filled, so they aren’t dealing with air bubbles.  There’s no LCD in this device, as that contributes to the bulk, and the e-ink screen [similar to that of an Amazon Kindle] has good contrast and good resolution.  It also has capacitive touch.”

I’ve seen the older device in action at Clara Barton Camp last summer.  It was amazing to hear what little kids thought about wearing three different devices.  But one device should be easier to tolerate, especially when your blood glucose is in range as a result.  So what’s the next step?  How does this thing go from on your desk to on my hip?”

“The iLet exists because of donations from people who believe in this project.  We want to build the consumable parts of this within the next nine months – that’s the infusion sets, tubing, and caps.  We’re on track to do that if we can get the money raised throughout the end of this year.  1.5 million is our 2015 goal.  The next big goal is to test in clinical trials by the last quarter 2016.”

“Tell me more about the clinical trials?”

“Trials will take place in four different sites, out-patient study that’s several weeks long.  It’s a bridging study that goes from the iPhone-based system to the iLet – helps pave the path final pivotal trial.  The pivotal trial takes us straight to FDA submission.  Each study substantiates and builds confidence between investigators and agencies.”

As a person with diabetes, it’s weird to be reminded of many hands are involved in allowing access to technology development and release into the wild.  And how much money is required.

“Can you show me how far we’ve come?  I saw the new iLet device at Friends for Life this summer, but some perspective would be awesome.  What did the first iteration look like?”

Ed’s team kindly dug back into the archives for this photo, which shows the old laptop-based system attached to a study participant.  (And for another old-school take, you can read Abby’s experience with the clinical trials here and here.)

From a team and a laptop and tubes and wires to a single device.  This is the kind of progress that excites me, because it’s happening NOW and the results have already changed lives.  After close to thirty years with diabetes, I’ve seen progress that has made insulin delivery easier and glucose monitoring easier, but the bionic pancreas is a whole new and astounding shift towards life with diabetes.

“And once it’s all said and done, there will be a device similar in look and feel to what I’m using now, only it will be a closed loop.  Which means the pump and the sensor talk to one another, and work with one another independent of my interaction.  Which means I don’t have to think about diabetes nearly as much.  Maybe not much at all,” I said to Chris, all in one breath, when I got home.  “I’m excited.  This is exciting.  I haven’t been this excited in a long, long time about diabetes.”

I believe that the bionic pancreas technology will make my diabetes less of an intrusion, ripping the dangling preposition “with diabetes” off of my life.

To learn more about the bionic pancreas program, please visit the website.  And if you believe in this mission, please consider making a donation to the project.


Sticky JMedical Giveaway Winner.

Through a very official and terribly complicated process of asking a friend to pick a number between 1 and 169, we have a winner!  Congratulations to Jennifer, who is a sentimental fan of Kermit.

(Yeah, I called you sentimental.  Mostly because you told me to.  Also, Sentimental Jennifer, I sent you an email this morning, so please check your inbox!)

A big thanks to everyone else who entered.  If you are interested in checking out the bracelet online at Sticky JMedical, click this link.  As far as Muppet responses, the diversity was incredible, but my favorite was the person who mentioned Bean Bunny.  (Also, did you know there is a Muppet wiki?  Say goodbye to the rest of your morning.)

Happy Friday!  And thanks for playing.

GIVEAWAY: My Favorite Medical Alert Bracelet.

The “long and overdue” part of this post cannot be over-stated.  I have had the best medical alert bracelet from Sticky JMedical for a very long time now and am just writing about it this morning.

But it’s lovely and discreet.  Because of that, I wear this bracelet every, single day, which helps protect me in the off-chance that something keeps me from speaking on my own behalf.

This is the bracelet that I have:

Medical alert bracelet #diabetes

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

And it is excellent in its simplicity. This bracelet has been worn while running over bridges, while carving pumpkins (it was easy enough to remove pumpkin guts from), on the red carpet, and around the house, no problem. It goes with everything. It doesn’t scream MEDICAL ALERT BRACELET, but if there’s an emergency, this jewelery is obvious in its intention.

It’s taken me several years to find an every day bracelet, but this one is it. So much so that I plan to purchase one for whoever wins today’s giveaway. If you’d like to enter, just leave a comment on this blog post with your preferred Muppet (any Muppet will do) and I’ll randomly select one winner on Friday morning. You can enter starting this morning through Thursday at midnight (and if there is a medical alert bracelet in the same price range that you’d prefer, I’m all ears).

Thanks to Sticky JMedical for creating something so timeless that writing about it a bit late is still hopefully acceptable.

[DISCLOSURE: Sticky JMedical sent me the bracelet several months ago for free but did not ask me to write about it, or host a giveaway. I decided to do that on my own because their product is pretty frigging awesome. All opinions are mine, as is my tardiness.]

Livongo Health: First Impressions of Their Meter.

Disclosure:  Manny Hernandez, SVP of Member Experience at Livongo Health, reached out to me a few weeks ago about test driving the Livongo meter.  Manny is my good friend, and diabetes is not my friend, so anything that helps a friend and also helps me take a bite out of diabetes is a welcomed opportunity.  For the purposes of this post, please know that the Livongo meter starter kit was sent to me at not cost, as were the test strips.  I offered to write about my experiences.  I’m not being paid for any of this.  All perspectives are mine.

For the last few weeks, I’ve been trying out the Livongo Health glucose meter.  These are my first impressions.  For another take, check out this post from the College Diabetes Network.  Time to purge thoughts:

The glucose meter is solid, and familiar enough to not be confusing.  The meter itself is big, but nice.  It’s much bigger than the Verio Sync that I’ve been using for the last two years, and I have a fear of dropping it on the floor and having it smash into a thousand pieces (as is my life trend).  The meter also did not fit into the bag I have been using for my One Touch meter, so I had to find a bigger bag.  The test strips are also much bigger (almost comically so).  But size, for me, doesn’t matter too much since my meter exists on my kitchen counter or in my purse, never in my pocket.  The color screen is very cool.  The touch screen is even cooler, and was appropriately responsive to commands from my digits.  Nicely done.

On the whole, checking my glucose was easy, especially since I’ve used lots of different meters in my years with diabetes.  The meter lets you know when the strip is ready for blood, and while you’re waiting for the countdown to the result, the meter gives you a little health fact.  “Did you know that laughing is a great way to reduce stress (make you feel better)?”  I would have loved to have been a fly on the wall for the meetings where they came up with dozens of these gems.  I enjoyed every, single one of them, even the repeats.  They gave a dose of personality and humanity to a task that is oftentimes less-than-enjoyable.

Syncing my results to the cloud wasn’t always seamless.  More often than not, my meter would claim that the connection to cellular signal {EDIT – I originally thought this was a wifi signal, but Manny let me know it’s a cellular connection.}  was too weak, and promised to send the result after my next check.  This didn’t bother me too much, but I with there was a manual way to send my results, instead of having to wait until the next check.  Hopefully that comes with the next iteration.

On the meter, the Snapshot Summary is very useful for me.  That’s why I like the Verio so much, because it uploads to my phone, giving me at-a-glance access to what my numbers have been like for the last two weeks.  The Livongo meter hits that same sweet spot.  The Logbook screen is basic and if this was my primary meter, it would be a good screen to track.  Same for the Patterns & Stats screen.  This screen was particularly helpful because it tracked my averages for specific times of day, and then gave me a percentage in-goal range on the same screen, for 14 days, 30 days, and 90 days worth of data.  Again, it’s hard to get a full feel for how functional these screens would be in my life because I’ve only been using the meter for about two weeks.  But a meter that logbooks automatically (automagically?) is an asset for someone like me who loathes to logbook.

The Activity option on the meter confused me, to be honest.  I wear a FitBit and I enjoy those competitions, but it’s easy to wear the FitBit on my wrist while I’m moving around.  Trotting around with my glucose meter on my hip is not going to happen.  Ever.  If this setting expanded to include activity trackers outside of the Livongo brand, that would be awesome.  Otherwise, this setting becomes akin to the one on the Apple watch (for me, anyway):  I already have a fitness tracker.  I don’t want to use four of them.  Communicate with the one I already use, or maybe allow for manual input?

The online portal is comprehensive.  I like logging into the online portal and seeing the weather for my location.  It was a touch creepy at first (I am predictably creeped out by how much the Internet knows about my location), but then it became a nice thing.  Like, “Hey.  Good morning, Kerri.  It’s 54 degrees out in your sunny corner of Rhode Island.  Put on a coat before walking to the bus stop, kitten.”  Only it didn’t call me kitten.  Though I’m sure that can be programmed in.

Two notes:  In updating my personal health profile on the Livongo portal, I entered my diagnosis date (9/11/1986) and realized that the year option only went back to 1979.  Is that because it was taking my birthday into account?  If so, clever.  Less-than-clever is the field about my last A1C.  I was able to note when my last A1C was taken, and also what the value was.  But I did not have the option NOT to enter a value.  I didn’t like this.  When it comes to health information stored on an external website, I prefer the option to share or not share.  Forcing the A1C value felt … forced.

The online portal allows me to add folks to access my data, in as much real-time as possible.  I can add people (Chris, my mom, my best friend) to be alerted to my blood sugars when they are out of range.  If I had a child with diabetes, this would be a terrific option because it would help me stay on track with what’s going on when my kid is out of my arm’s reach.  But as an adult with diabetes, I don’t need to alert my family and friends if I check and am low or high.  I realize this flies in the face of my decision to share CGM data, but there’s a difference for me:  my CGM data will stream to the cloud and alert my family in the moments when I might not be awake or aware enough to check my blood sugar.  A low in the middle of the night is not always confirmed with a glucose check.  Most of the time, I wake up knowing I’m in trouble, and I treat without checking first.  The important thing is bringing up the low; I don’t need to know the exact number.

The portal also allows a health team to be created (or at least documented), letting me add my doctor to receive updates from my meter in a comprehensive way.  Again, this isn’t something I have any plans to take advantage of, but for people who need and/or want to be in more constant contact with their medical team, this is a terrific option.  (I don’t think my doctor wants to hear from me all the time, but when I was pregnant, I know she would have loved receiving my logs every two weeks, instead of me faxing them to her office.)  Through the portal, you can also access a Livongo health coach (from their team of CDEs) who will walk you through different issues at a pace set by you.  I haven’t tried this feature out yet, but if you have and can offer some feedback, I’d love to hear it.

The meter results are what matter most to me, though.  Size, color, bells, whistles, etc don’t matter when it comes to accuracy.  I have an inherent mistrust of all data (I think it stems from the lack of trust I have for my stupid pancreas), so I check and double check new devices until I feel comfortable with them.  To that end, I’ve used my Verio meter every time I’ve used my Livongo meter, and have checked both of those results against my CGM data.  (Excessive?  Yep.  But the meter came as part of a trial experience, so it wasn’t an out of pocket cost.)  Overall, the Livongo meter ran lower than the Verio meter.  Not enough to cause an uproar, but enough that I noticed every time.  My Verio meter was closer to my Dexcom on the whole, but I also use the Verio to calibrate my Dexcom, so there’s a data bias in play.  But everything was in line, well enough, to make me feel comfortable making insulin decisions off the Livongo results.

Did I trust the results?  Yes.  Well enough, at least, to be honest.  It’s hard for me not to defer to the tech that shows me as higher because when shown lower results, my brain immediately thinks, “Yes, but what if I’m actually the higher number?  That should be corrected.  I don’t want to be lulled into a false sense of security.”  I plan to use the Livongo meter to calibrate my next Dexcom sensor, to see if that shows a noticeable trend difference.  I’ve talked about new tech here on SUM often, and the running theme seems to be that I balk at change.  “New” and “different” are always initially met with a “get off my lawn” response, because I don’t like adjusting to anything new.  (Case-in-point:  The clip on the Animas pump made me crazy at first, because the top of it was just ever-so-slightly different from the Minimed one.  It took me at least two weeks to adjust to how that felt.  But then I got used to it.  Same with the new G5 transmitter, which is slightly thicker than the G4 transmitter, and it currently feeling like a doorknob attached to my thigh.  I’m sure I’ll adjust to that newness, too, but it takes me some time.  Also, you’re welcome to stay on my lawn.  I don’t mind.  It will just take a few days for me to get used to you being there.)

Looking at the cost.  There is an early access program being offered by the Livongo team right now (but rapidly drawing to a close, so if you want to sign up, I’d recommend doing that today.  Manny advised that the offer is “winding down as we speak.”).  For more details, you can click on this link or on the image below.  I’m not sure about insurance coverage for this meter and it’s associated services, but I do know that the early access program offers a deal with subscription.  From the website:  “The In Touch blood glucose monitoring system and all supplies, including unlimited strips and lancets — even shipping costs — are covered as part of your subscription.  Your participation as an early access member costs only $25 per month (guaranteed for 2 years).”  It’s the “unlimited” promise, as it pertains to the test strips, that peaks my interest for sure.  Strips are the priciest part of testing my blood sugar, so “unlimited” is a nice and welcomed bonus.

I’ll check back in a few weeks with second impressions of the Livongo meter.  If there’s anything specific you’d like to know more about, please ask!  Thanks to Manny, and the team at Livongo, for letting me give this meter a go.



Diabetes 365 Giveaway Winners.

Thanks for all of the comments on Wednesday’s post about burnout and “diabetes overwhelmus.”  There were some great strategies and tips on wrangling in the chaos and living well.

Congrats to the three commenters who won copies of the new book, Diabetes 365, penned by Paula Ford-Martin and Susan Wiener!

Here are the winning entries:

[When I am] Overwhelmed…I look around and count 5 blessing. It can be a good reality check and a notice that it could be worse.

I get most overwhelmed when dealing with a sticky high. I have learned that going for a walk will clear my head and help lower my blood sugar. A two-fer!
Colleen Grogan

Whenever I begin to feel “Diabetes overwhelmus” I remind myself that while it might be tempting to stop caring/trying, it is SO not worth the return of constant thirst (in addition to all of the other symptoms / complications)…there’s nothing worse then the relentless thirst of a high blood sugar! I just try and look at how far I have come, and everything I have to look forward to. When that doesn’t work, I try and see my diabetes educator- after getting to see or talk to her, I always feel like a huge weight has been lifted off of my shoulders.

Bonnie, Colleen, and Erin, I’ll be emailing you this morning with details on delivering your book to you.  Thanks to Paula and Susan for offering copies of their book as a giveaway!


Guest Post and Giveaway: Overcoming Diabetes Overwhelmus.

Today, I am honored to have Susan Weiner and Paula Ford-Martin contributing a guest post to SUM, writing about diabetes burnout and their new book, Diabetes 365: Tips for Living Well.  I’m pretty biased, as I used to work for Paula at dLife (and with Susan), but their book and their message are a tremendous resource for newly diagnosed and veteran PWD alike. 

I’m also excited to host an opportunity for three folks to win a copy of the book.  To enter to win, please leave a comment with your best tip on dealing with “diabetes overwhelmus.”  (Be sure to include your email!)  The giveaway will be open until Thursday night at midnight EST, and winners will be announced on Friday morning. 

*   *   *

Overcoming Diabetes Overwhelmus
Guest bloggers Susan Weiner and Paula Ford-Martin

The late, great Dr. Richard Rubin had a great knack for turning a quality phrase. “Diabetes overwhelmus” (a.k.a. diabetes burnout) was one of our favorites. Layman’s definition? When the continuous demands of diabetes, and the non-stop flow of diabetes-related information, simply become too much to deal with and you’re ready to throw up your hands and have a mad as hell moment.

The side effects of diabetes overwhelmus are a tendency to become less active in one’s own self-care. So diabetes management starts to slip, stress goes up (along with stress hormones and blood sugar), and then you’re caught in a vicious cycle of bad feelings – both physical and emotional. It’s a crappy place to be.

Now we want to take a moment to pause for a disclaimer here. We both work in diabetes, we support friends and family with diabetes, and we know a lot about the academics of the disease. But neither of us can say we have the intimate knowledge of knowing what it’s like to live with diabetes 24/7.

But stress, the broader idea of “life overwhelmus,” and the negative impact both have on the human body? We’ve got loads of personal experience there. The busier life gets, the harder you need to work to maintain your physical and emotional well-being. Yet most of us let life’s obligations push those things down in the priority list. And even though we’ve both worked in the health education field for many years, we admit we have let stress get the better of our health and well-being more than once in our lives. In fact, we wish there was a frequent flyer program for hospital visits and doctor’s appointments – we’d be Platinum Club Members.

A survey on stress in America found that almost half of the population has experienced a major stress in the prior twelve months, and health problems were cited as the most common source of stress. Thirty-six percent of people living with a chronic illness reported high stress levels in the prior month, with a whopping 60 percent of those in “poor health” reporting those same high stress levels. That’s probably not a surprise to anyone reading this blog post. Being “sick” makes you stressed, and stress makes you sick.

Susan has a patient, Tess (not her real name). Tess has type 2 diabetes, works full-time, takes care of a family, parents teenage children, and is the primary caregiver for her live-in mom, who was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Over time, she found herself completely overwhelmed and bombarded on all fronts. Eventually she stopped taking care of herself. She ate food on the run, sometimes skipped her meals completely, didn’t refill her medications, and didn’t keep doctor appointments.

Tess felt terrible and had high blood sugars. But she went to visit Susan because she was ready to take one small step to get out of her diabetes rut. Susan listened to what Tess’s biggest stressors were and her desire to address them, and they started with one simple goal focused on an issue plaguing Tess – taking time each night to pack up snacks and plan the next day’s meals. Over time, they added more small goals based on Tess’s real life problems, and now she feels in control of her life and health again. She isn’t eating out of frustration or anxiety, and is starting to gain better control over her blood sugar.

It was this small step approach that inspired our latest project, Diabetes 365: Tips for Living Well (Demos Health, 2015). We wanted to help people like Tess come at diabetes from a less intense, more manageable angle. Our intent was not to offer a soup to nuts guide on treating your diabetes; instead each day of the year offers a new start and a focused tip, idea, or action you can take to improve your health and happiness. In other words, it’s not the OED of diabetes, it’s daily Cliff Notes. As our friend Jim Turner says, “Diabetes is complicated and overwhelming enough. I like simple, straightforward suggestions.”

“Bite sized” diabetes goals may be your way out of diabetes overwhelmus. Or, you may find relief in other ways – diabetes support groups, meditation, or reading a daily dose of inspiration here at SUM. But at the root of it all is not letting life get in the way of living, and finding a way to co-exist with all of those personal, professional, and diabetes challenges. In the words of our gracious host Kerri: “I need to remember that I can do this. I can conquer this. I can design this and devour this and delight in this.”

*   *   *

Susan Weiner is owner of Susan Weiner Nutrition, PLLC, in New York. She is an award-winning author, registered dietitian-nutritionist, and certified diabetes educator. Susan is the 2015 AADE Diabetes Educator of the Year, the 2015 Diabetes Health Monitor LifeChanger award winner, and the 2014 Alumna of the Year for SUNY Oneonta. She is also the 2015–2016 editor for On the Cutting Edge, a peer-reviewed journal for the Diabetes Care and Education practice group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Susan advises several nonprofit groups devoted to diabetes advocacy; she is on the advisory board of Diabetes Sisters, and is an educational advisor for Marjorie’s Fund. She is also the diabetes medical advisor for and is on the medical advisory board for dLife.

Paula Ford-Martin is an award winning health writer, editor, and content producer. She is the author of more than a dozen consumer health and parenting books, and currently works as a freelance content strategist and consultant. Paula was part of the core team that created and launched dLife, a groundbreaking multimedia diabetes consumer resource. She served as the Chief Content Officer of dLife for eight years, and her work on CNBC’s dLifeTV—the first and longest running primetime diabetes television show—garnered her 26 Telly Awards. You can learn more about Paula and her work at



Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers