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Posts from the ‘Diabetes Products’ Category

Tandem X2 with Dexcom G5 Update

[Please read my Tandem disclosure.  I was not asked to write this post.  But I need to disclose anyway, because it felt weird not to.]

Even though the update email came in a few days ago, I didn’t have a chance to update my Tandem X2 insulin pump until yesterday afternoon.  My original intentions were to sit down (preferably with a cup of tea and my reading glasses, so I could look the part of “focused” which would hopefully, in turn, become real focus) and update my pump in a relaxed environment, but that’s not a thing in my house anymore.  Every time I went to update the pump, the little Guy needed a snack or Birdzone wanted to play Spit (she kicks my butt regularly) or one of the neighborhood kids would roll through the house or the phone would ring or … the list of distractions remains long.

So I had to just sit down at the kitchen table and update the damn thing, house tornado be damned.

It was easy.  Thankfully, because I was only able to keep half an eyeball on the process as it unfolded.

The information I needed – my pump’s serial number and my “update ID number” – was in the email from Tandem Device Updater (if you’re looking for it in your inbox), so once I downloaded the device updater software to my computer, it took just a few minutes to update my pump.  I plugged my pump into the charger and then stuck the charger into the computer’s USB port, followed the prompts, and let my pump get pumpier.

The device updater

I knew the pump was ready to roll once this screen came up –
the update ID from the email went here.

Once the pump was plugged in, this screen popped up.

“Whoa, your pump updates like an iPhone?”  The 13 year old boy who lives down the street asked.

“It does,” I said, watching the blue progress line for the update move across my computer screen.

“That’s cool,” he said.

Truth.  My X2 now grabs Dexcom G5 results and shows them on the pump.  And I’m still learning the ropes with this new update.  In total, the update took about 15 minutes to work through.  I decided to wait until I was ready for a site change because in doing the update, I’d need to swap everything out anyway, and would also have my IOB set back to zero.

I have my iPhone running the G5 app in addition to the pump, and both appear to be working fine.  I was concerned about battery life after making the update, but since it’s been less than 24 hours since updating, I’ll have to come back to that at another time.


Updated!!

What was nice, though, is that my CGM was already up and running on my phone before I updated my pump, so when the update completed on my pump, the CGM results showed up immediately.  It didn’t seem like I had to independently calibrate my pump and my Dexcom phone app.  I’m rebooting my CGM sensor as I type this, so I’ll have a better sense of how this all works in a few hours.  In addition to CGM functionality and battery life, I’m really curious to see what the payment/update reimbursement structure will look like for future updates.  The G5 update was free.

The bottom line, for me, is that updates are available for my insulin pump that don’t require me to wait for a FedEx box to arrive before I can access them, and that’s damn convenient.  Having a pump that can be updated from my house while dinner is cooking (read: burning), kids are running amuck, and emails are dinging makes diabetes fit better into my life … in that I don’t have to organize my life around diabetes.

Useless Juice.

We don’t drink juice “for fun” in our house; it’s only for low blood sugars, considered almost as medicinal as the insulin hiding out in the butter compartment of our fridge.

So when I came home with these juice boxes unintentionally, I was pissed.

35% less sugar?  That’s exactly what I don’t want!

Useless juice.  I’m bringing it back and swapping it out for the fixes-a-40mg/dL-at-4am kind of juice.  The high octane juice.  Proper juice.

Review: Verio Flex Meter.

For years, my love for the One Touch Verio Sync meter knew no limits.  Despite a slightly MS-DOS interface that only showed me one result at a time and didn’t let me scroll back to other results unless I loaded them to the Reveal application, I loved this meter.  It was small, it was accurate (as compared to my Dexcom CGM, which I feel is my personal gold standard), and it was covered my by insurance.

I really liked how it worked with the Reveal app the most, though.  I have always struggled with maintaining a blood sugar logbook, and being able to bluetooth my results to my phone and have them collect in an at-a-glance and also an in-depth data map took the heat off my data angst.

But not everyone loved the Sync.  And recently, it was scrapped and replaced by the Verio Flex meter.

I resisted the Flex mostly because I hate change (<– curmudgeon font), but a few weeks ago, I finally switched over (after putting my two Verio Syncs into a cryptex).  Here are my initial thoughts:

PROS:

The Verio Flex turns off immediately after you take the test strip out of it.  This is a nice change from the Sync, where it would either have to time out or be pushed off using the button after each blood sugar check.  The auto-off helps conserve battery (more on why that matters in the CONS section).

There’s a small color chart on the bottom of meter screen (on the actual housing of the meter – see picture) where an arrow shows up underneath each BG result to indicate low, high, or in range.  While this isn’t as useful for me because I’m familiar with the ranges recommended for me, this could be a really useful feature for folks newly diagnosed or who aren’t as familiar with in-range and out-of-range.

It comes with a Delica lancing device, which is my favorite, if you can say such a thing about a device meant to pierce skin.

It’s durable and decently priced.  I paid $19.99 for mine at CVS and when it dropped onto the hard kitchen tile that same night, it did not smash to bits.

CONS:

The battery life doesn’t appear to be awesome.  My glucose meters in the past have taken over a year to burn through a battery, but I’ve already replaced the Flex battery after about a month.  I’m sure the bluetooth transmission cycles the battery quickly, but it was irritating to have to switch out the battery so soon.  I like my t:slim pump because it can be plugged in and charged versus needing to keep a stash of AA batteries, and I liked the Sync for the same reason.

No light!  On the Sync, there was a light at the top of the meter that was bright enough to test in the middle of the night without turning on the lamp.  This was an awesome feature, and I have no idea why it was removed from the Flex, but it’s SORELY MISSED.  Never underestimate the value of a little light that keeps you from putting blood on the strip in a mangled way, wasting the strip.

And the syncing feature takes a while.  I feel like the Sync synced faster while the Flex takes more time to flex its bluetooth muscle.  The way the data maps on the app is identical, so that’s fine, but getting that data there is something I have to remember to do, so every second matters.

Overall, the Flex is similar enough to the Sync that I won’t bust the cryptex back open yet, but hopefully the next iteration will be better on battery, upload automagically to my pump, and the light will return!

Gift Ideas for People with Diabetes.

What do you get for the person who has everything … except a working pancreas?  Here are six (until me) of my favorite d-related things:

  1. Medical alert jewelry.  Looking for medical alert jewelry that isn’t clunky or ugly? I’ve always loved this simple, classic bracelet from StickyJ Jewelry and have been wearing it daily for the last few years.  It’s comfortable and chic!
  2. Diabetes books.  This one is entirely self-serving, but if you’re looking for some diabetes reading, you can pick up a copy of my book, Balancing Diabetes, or check out any of these other titles that are diabetes-centric.  Nothing like curling up with a good, islet-inspired book.
  3. Jerry the Bear.  How about some diabetes that you can cuddle?  Check out Jerry the Bear, a stuffed animal designed to teach kids about diabetes through play.  (Read more about how my daughter bonding with Jerry here.)
  4. Donate.  You can make a difference for PWD by donating to your favorite diabetes organization or charity.  Help support Children with Diabetes and keep this amazing conference going, or give thanks through the Diabetes Hands Foundation thank you cards, or consider sparing a rose to help provide life for a child.
  5. Diabetes accessories.  Bring some festive flair to your diabetes devices with accessories from Tallygear or Myabetic.  These two shops blow the basic black meter case out of the water.
  6. Diabetes decals.  Dress up your meter, or pump, or Dexcom with some designs from PumpPeelz.  You can even design your own decal right on their website!

Happy shopping, and if you have a favorite diabetes product, service, or accessory you’d like to share, please feel free to do that in the comments section.

That Clip, Though.

I’ve been using the t:slim pump for the better part of a year now, and over the last few months (here’s a handy disclosure that you should read for context on my relationship with Tandem), I’ve appreciated the new set of options that the t:slim has brought into my diabetes life.

… man, that sounds a little formal.  I’m too pregnant for formality at the moment.  (My feet have officially given up on being feet and refuse any covering other than socks or flip flops, and my son is moving visibly as I type, making sitting close to my desk a challenge. Eff formality.)  The reasons for the t:slim being a badass addition to my diabetes management RIGHT THIS SECOND are that I can take a bolus in a matter of seconds without scrolling through fifty different screens, I can edit my basal or insulin:carb needs with a few beeps, and the 300 unit reservoir is going to come in handy these last few weeks of pregnancy.

One challenge I’ve historically had with the t:slim pump, however, is the clip that is shipped out with it.  For me, the clip was a little bulkier than I preferred and also not as secure as I needed.  I wanted streamlined and secure, and as my pregnant body expands and clothing options like “pockets” and “waistbands” have been shoved into the distance.  I need my pump clip to be able to hang on by a thread.

This one works great, though:

I love this clip. #tslim #diabetes #insulinpump

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

A friend suggested this clip to me and gave me one of theirs, but since trying it out, I’ve keep a spare or two on hand because it seriously solves all of my pump clip troubles.  The tape is very secure and I’ve had the same pump clip stay successfully stuck for the last six months.  I have no relationship with the company who makes the clip, and this is not an affiliate link or anything like that, but if you want to try out a pump clip for your t:slim (or any other pump) that is subtle, streamlined, and strong, this Nite Ize Hip Clip is worth a shot.

Hey! An informative post! Who saw that coming? Not me. Bring on the cat gifs.

cat filing his nails

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