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Posts from the ‘Diabetes Online Community’ Category

Guest Post: Can Neither Confirm Nor Deny.

There’s power to the “me, too!” moments for sure, but there’s vulnerability involved in raising your hand first to say, “Me.”  Today, I have a guest post from a writer who wished to stay anonymous but who is looking for others who may have experienced something similar to what they went through.  If you’ve ever passed out or had a seizure, or have experienced a pocket of time where you know something diabetes-related happened but you can’t quite explain it, please leave a comment for this writer.  They need community now, more than ever.

*   *   *

The day was just like any other. Except it was a Friday before vacation where the afternoon is extra stressful to complete everything before heading out and not looking back for one week. That morning the Dexcom sensor was incredibly itchy, so I removed it.

When the work day was done I left with a bunch of errands to run before I could really enjoy myself. At the first stop I couldn’t find my wallet in my bag even though I knew it was in there. I was disoriented and didn’t know why. I kept apologizing.  I was so embarrassed about my lack of functionality that I returned to my car with nothing completed for my errand.

An hour later I “woke up” confused as to where my phone could possibly be. I found it in the trunk of my car. There is no memory of what happened after I sat down in my car (parked). However, as soon as I woke up I knew I had passed out. Presumably from a low blood sugar based on my actions during my errand. Based on the location of my phone, I believe it is possible I seized as well. I have no way to confirm or deny this assumption.

I do not know if this will ever happen again. I do not know how I came-to on my own. I do not know why I am lucky enough to have survived this. I do know that I reached out to my support system. I reached out to the people who would take it as is and not freak out. I was doing enough of that on my own. I do know that it is a hard event to move on from. I also know I’m not willing to let the whole world know yet.

But! Has anyone had this happen to them? Or something similar? How did you continue to live your whole life with diabetes without this always being in the back of your mind? Or front and center? Did you over treat? Or start treating almost lows, which weren’t lows but actually acceptable blood sugars? How do you keep your focus on your sugars and not raise your perception of what’s an “acceptable blood sugar”?

*   *   *

I’m glad you’re okay, Anonymous.

That Big, Effing Frog. #DOCtober

Busy weekend, with a pile of unrelated-to-diabetes moments and a few that were decidedly diabetes.  But to start, I’ll catch up on my #DOCtober photo posts.

How is your #DOCtober going?

Diabetes 365 Giveaway Winners.

Thanks for all of the comments on Wednesday’s post about burnout and “diabetes overwhelmus.”  There were some great strategies and tips on wrangling in the chaos and living well.

Congrats to the three commenters who won copies of the new book, Diabetes 365, penned by Paula Ford-Martin and Susan Wiener!

Here are the winning entries:

[When I am] Overwhelmed…I look around and count 5 blessing. It can be a good reality check and a notice that it could be worse.

I get most overwhelmed when dealing with a sticky high. I have learned that going for a walk will clear my head and help lower my blood sugar. A two-fer!
Colleen Grogan

Whenever I begin to feel “Diabetes overwhelmus” I remind myself that while it might be tempting to stop caring/trying, it is SO not worth the return of constant thirst (in addition to all of the other symptoms / complications)…there’s nothing worse then the relentless thirst of a high blood sugar! I just try and look at how far I have come, and everything I have to look forward to. When that doesn’t work, I try and see my diabetes educator- after getting to see or talk to her, I always feel like a huge weight has been lifted off of my shoulders.

Bonnie, Colleen, and Erin, I’ll be emailing you this morning with details on delivering your book to you.  Thanks to Paula and Susan for offering copies of their book as a giveaway!


Photo Challenge: #DOCtober.

Taking pictures is something I like to do very much.  I’m not terribly talented when it comes to doing it and my equipment is pretty basic, but I enjoy framing something up and preserving that moment.  I used to take a lot of pictures, but I’ve tapered off in the last few years, and I miss it.




I am forcing myself to get back behind the lens with a daily photo challenge for October.  The twist – BET YOU DIDN’T SEE THIS COMING – is to see if I can find something diabetes-related to photograph for the month.  If I can, awesome.  If I can’t, that inability shows how diabetes can’t and shouldn’t always be front-and-center.

Want to join me?  I’ll be posting on the blog and Instagram under the hashtag #DOCtober.

For #DOCtober 1/31, I’m already cheating a little by posting a photo from last week.  The sign reads, “Unusual Pumpkins + Gourds.”  And it reminded me of you guys, the diabetes community.  The patient community.  The community of people who are touched by some kind of health condition but aren’t owned by it and are beautiful because of and despite it.

Well sheeeeeeeeet, if we aren’t all a pile of beautifully unusual pumpkins and gourds.

Reaching the Summit.

Last week, I was in Sweden for work, for the fourth annual blogger summit that Animas hosts during the EASD conference.  (Here’s a look at the first summit, and the second one, and last year. And here’s a look at my disclosures, as my work with Animas is what brings me to these different places.)  I’m in the process of downloading my brain on conversations that took place over the last week, in search of a few thousand words to express what I’ve learned, but in the meantime, isn’t there a thing about pictures saying a thousand words? 

If so, I’m cashing that concept in for this blog post.

EU Blogger Summit

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

More Sweden.

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

Stockholm. #nofilter #latergram

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

Old City. #latergram

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

Me and my Bird, checking out Stockholm Old City.

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

And, in unrelated news, I have discovered a new favorite writer. That person is whoever the genius is behind the Iceland Air in-flight menu copy.

@icelandair, you are fun.

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

To A Crisp.

The folks at Diabetes Daily have cobbled together a day to discuss diabetes social media burnout.  (Yes, ironic to dedicate a day of online discussion about diabetes social media burnout …) but the topic is real and something that we have all encountered over the years, so it bears discussion.

Only I’m not talking about it today.

Why?  Because I don’t really feel up to it.

The crap that I have to do to stay on top of diabetes is non-negotiable.  Checking blood sugars, making careful food choices, exercising, blah, blah, blaaaaah.  That stuff is part of the repertoire I cannot ignore without putting my health at significant risk.

But the blogging partTwitterInstagram?  Answering emails?  That’s not required for diabetes management.  That’s auxiliary.  And mostly positive, in my experiences.  The Internet isn’t always the cuddliest place, but in the diabetes community there is a welcomed trend of positive interactions and real, substantial relationships with people touched by diabetes coming together to share experiences, ideas, and to help someone carry the parts of diabetes that get a little heavy at times.

But these connections are not required.  They are a choice you can make, just like opening your computer or clicking away on your smartphone.  More choices follow from there, steeped in personal preferences:  Download the Facebook app on your phone?  Only use Twitter during #dsma?  Take weekends off from social media?  Engage with trolls?  Engage in supportive interactions and fruitful friendships?  Give a shit about cruel things that people might say?  Ignore/block/delete unwanted commentary?  Seek out local, in-person meet-ups?  Have long text message threads with friends you’ve made in the DOC?  Dedicate your personal and professional life to diabetes efforts?

… or how about take a breath?  Enjoy a combination of what’s available.  Relax a little bit.  Enjoy social media as an option, not as a requirement.  The Diabetes Online Community is a tool in our diabetes management toolbox.  And just like with any toolbox, you don’t always need the same one.  (Avoid trying to use a flat head when you need a Phillips.  Don’t use a hammer when you need a steamroller.  Learn the difference between a level and a wrench.  Never substitute playdough for a nail.  Don’t chew on a socketwrench.  Et cetera.)

For more on diabetes burnout with a side of social media, check out these posts:

Slightly Charred

Show Me Your Pump … Or Not


Talking About Diabetes Burnout

Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!




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