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Posts from the ‘Diabetes Online Community’ Category

Beyond Type 1: LOVE IS ON.

Despite being up to my eyeballs in parenting stuff [insert baby who doesn’t sleep at all at night plus a big sister who had her first ear infection over the weekend here], I have been online.  And I’ve totally seen the Beyond Type 1 black-and-white photo’d community posts scrolling by, asking for donations and awareness for the Revlon LOVE IS ON Million Dollar Challenge.

I’ll admit that I was a little confused at first.  If Beyond Type 1 was aiming to win a million dollars from this campaign, why were they fundraising?  Of course the goal is to earn $1 MM for Beyond Type 1 courtesy of Revlon, but why are people fund raising if the goal is to win the big prize?  Is it to show how much the community can raise first?  Also, what does Beyond Type 1 plan to spend the prize money on?  I’ve been very impressed by the presence that Beyond Type 1 has created in the diabetes community, but I’ll admit that I’m not exactly sure what the organization does, or plans to do, outside of awareness.  (And I’ll also admit that I haven’t been focused on diabetes stuff in the last seven weeks, making me unaware of The Obvious lately.)  I needed to learn more.

So I emailed with Mary Lucas, Community Partners and Programs Manager for Beyond Type 1, and she provided me with some clarity for my confusion.   (All italicized answers below are from Mary, who is patient beyond patient when it comes to replying to multiple scattered emails from this exhausted new mom.)

From Mary:  

The Revlon LOVE IS ON Million Dollar Challenge is a six week challenge that 150 charities were invited to participate in. At the end of those 6 weeks, the nonprofit that has raised the most money total is awarded an extra $1 Million from Revlon. There are smaller consolation prizes for second and third. Every charity still gets to keep their money raised, it is just an extra added bonus. On top of that, the nonprofit that wins would be accepting a comedically-sized large check in a very public setting with media, etc. and would subsequently drum up a ton of press and hype around that charity and the cause associated with it. It would be really great to have a diabetes charity up there accepting the $1 Million from Revlon, as it would really help get T1D into the mainstream press and media.

As a non-profit, all our operations are covered by leadership and founding friends, so 100% of all money donated to us goes back into our portfolio of programs and investments.   This means we are fully operational funded, so $1 in to us is $1 back out into the diabetes community, not 75 or 80 or 90 cents, but the entire dollar, which is pretty rare for a non-profit. So far, we have invested in both our own native programs (that we currently offer for free for everyone in the type 1 community) such as our Snail Mail Club, the App, Education Initiatives and Resources, Camp Sessions, and the DKA Awareness Initiative we will be rolling out nationwide in just a few weeks.

We have also given grants to organizations working on cure efforts such as ViaCyte and the DRI, technology efforts such as Nightscout and Tidepool, and community /education /advocacy efforts like The Human Trial Film, Riding on Insulin, Marjorie’s Fund, and T1 International. The grant we gave to Marjorie’s Fund last year actually helped open a new diabetes education center in Uganda this summer! (To learn more about all of the grantees, etc. you can visit this page on the website.) We like to fundraise for a variety of things across the areas of educate, advocate and cure — we want to help people living with T1D today while still researching and working towards a cure for tomorrow.

If we won the Revlon Challenge, the extra money would be used not only to help fund our native programs and keep those going, but would also enabled us to open up applications for grants once again.

The Revlon Challenge also has some cool opportunities and bonus challenges they do throughout (such as matching donations, etc.) and we also have done some fun things like offering a Percy the Plushy Snail (our Snail Mail Club Mascot who is not for sale yet but is pretty much the cutest thing ever – he has an insulin pump!) for everyone who donates $50 to Percy’s fundraising page. And of course right now are doing the Nick Jonas meet and greet giveaway – so people have some cool opportunities to win extra stuff!

Thanks for all of the information, Mary!  Now I have a better idea of where our donation is going when we chip in for the Million Dollar Challenge.  Here’s hoping Beyond Type 1 is able to win the challenge and bring diabetes into mainstream discussion.


Type 1 Origins: Talking Comic Books with Partha Kar.

Dr. Partha Kar

Dr. Kar has been a Consultant in Diabetes & Endocrinology at Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust since 2008 and the Clinical Director of Diabetes from 2009-2015.  One of his main areas or passion is in helping to redesign diabetes care in an attempt to integrate chronic disease management across primary and secondary care.  He’s won many awards and has helped patients with diabetes across the spectrum.  I’ve been following UK endocrinologist Dr. Partha Kar on Twitter for ages now and have been watching the development of his type 1 diabetes-centric comic book with excitement.  Just recently, the comic was released into the wild.

The superhero twist that wraps around the diabetes narrative makes the idea all the more interesting.  According to the comic intro, “As comic and superhero fans, it seemed to us that there were some parallels between the times when a type 1 diabetes diagnosis is made and when a superhero discovers their powers for the first time. There is often shock and surprise among the feelings experienced in both situations, followed by acceptance and adaptation.”

I couldn’t agree more, and was thrilled that Dr. Kar took a few minutes of his time to answer some questions about his work, the comic, and the DOC.

–   –   –

Kerri: Thanks for taking the time to answer a few questions, Dr. Kar! Can you give me a little background on your involvement with the diabetes online community, and how diabetes has touched your life, personally?

Dr. Kar: Social media and interaction with the DOC probably has been the biggest education I have received in my career. Its been fun, enjoyable and educational and I have enjoyed so much of it! Personally, this is my life, my work, my job and everyday in one way or another, diabetes always affects what I do – much needs to improve in my view. I see folks struggle every day with little things – somehow it would be nice if even a little bit of that could be improved.

Kerri: I’ve been watching the development of your T1D-centric comic book with great interest from the US. Can you tell me a bit about why you created this comic?

Dr. Kar: Comics are great source of education-as far as I am concerned – I have always loved how they have explored the issues of social isolation (X men); teenage angst (Spiderman) etc. and has always been one of my loves of life. Somehow it seemed natural to join that and diabetes together – it felt like a medium which hasn’t been used much – and perhaps could help with showcasing type 1 diabetes and raising awareness.

Kerri: What makes the narrative of diabetes so important, in your opinion?

Dr. Kar: Diabetes is and always has been a multifaceted condition – ignorance towards it – or simply labeling it as a condition of “being unhealthy” is wrong on so many levels, let alone the different types which are totally different entities. Its important we make that clear.  Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are fundamentally different with fundamentally different needs – it’s important as HCPs that we help in raising this awareness too.

Kerri: Who helped you bring your creative vision for the diabetes comic to fruition?

Dr. Kar: As regards the comic book, big thank you to many individuals. I don’t have type 1 diabetes – it would be silly as fellas wrong for me to do the narrative – I wouldn’t even know what it is to have a hypo. Thus, my huge thank you to Andy Broomhead, Jen Blackwell, Laura Cleverly, and Joe Griffiths who helped create the story board. Danny Mclaughin from Revolve Comics was the dude who brought it all to life – while my co-conspirator was Dr. Mayank Patel- we have always call each other Bruce & Clark. I will let you figure out who is who!

Kerri: What are you hoping to accomplish with this piece? And what part of the comic are you most proud of?

Dr. Kar: Raising awareness is a key theme, as well as maybe helping to explain type 1 diabetes to someone newly diagnosed slightly differently. My analogy is that its perhaps like a super power – but not one which people want – sort of like the Hulk, who spends his entire life trying to find the cure but along the way, learns to live with it, sometimes control it … a super power he never wanted in the first place. Proudest part? Perhaps the panel where the character meets someone he knows and understands he is not “alone.”

Quality nod to S.H.I.E.L.D.

Kerri: Outside of the comic trade, I know you’re actively involved with the diabetes community as a healthcare professional. What is your background as a healthcare provider, and how does that background intersect with your creative outreach efforts?

Dr. Kar: I like trying different things- for example a one stop shop for those with type 1 diabetes or indeed TED style talks. I like changing things, shaping new things, exploring new horizons … I suppose I like a challenge and for certain, improving type 1 diabetes care is no small one. I have a huge desire to improve type 1 diabetes care – let’s see where it takes me!

Kerri: How can readers of Six Until Me check out your comic book? And also, how can they connect with you on social media?

Dr. Kar: Comic book is free! Go to Revolve Comics and feel free to download- use it, spread the word and hey if you like it and want more, come back with ideas! Who knows – I have ideas swirling in my head about turning this into an animation … early days but who knows!

As regards getting in touch- just follow me on Twitter (@parthaskar) and feel free to poke, ask anything you want. As I say to all and sundry, if asked with respect, no question is tough- if I don’t know it, I will be the first one to put my hand up. I look forward to interacting with as many folks with T1D as I can.  As I said, it’s always such a fab learning opportunity and I genuinely enjoy the chats.

 –   –   –

Thanks for chatting with me, Dr. Kar, and I’m looking forward to more from your team of superheroes!  To download the comic, visit Revolve Comics and you can grab it for free.

Racing on Insulin: 100th Running of the Indianapolis 500.

What did you do this weekend?  Me?  Oh, I spent Sunday afternoon with 41 of my DOC friends at the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500 race.  Sort of.

Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2007, Charlie Kimball is driving the narrative about type 1 diabetes as the first licensed driver with diabetes and first licensed driver to qualify for and complete the Indianapolis 500 in the history of Indycar.  He and I have known one another for many years (he’s been a good sport as far as videos, Twitter, and allowing my infant daughter to sit in his race helmet), and it’s been truly humbling AND EXCITING to watch Charlie rise in the Indycar circuit.

And on Sunday afternoon, Charlie Kimball got behind the wheel of his No. 42 Tresiba Chevrolet and took to the racetrack.  But he wasn’t alone; he had his Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing team by his side, and the names of 42 diabetes community friends emblazoned on the sides of his car.

I talked with Charlie on Friday, before the race, and he shared a little bit about why he raced with diabetes advocates on his car.  “With the Indianapolis 500, there’s so much history, so many stories, so many anecdotes.  Novo Nordisk and Chip Ganassi Racing wanted to do something to kickstart the conversation about diabetes.  We wanted to do something cool, something to make sure that the diabetes community had their story heard.”

This weekend, Charlie wasn’t racing as #83, but instead as #42.  “The number 42 comes up often – there are 42 names on the car, Tresiba [new basal insulin available through Novo Nordisk] lasts for 42 hours, and 42 is the number on Kyle Larson‘s car.”  (Kyle Larson races NASCAR, and Kyle’s cousin Justin has T1D.)  “People don’t often see that Chip Ganassi has real team relationships across series, which is why I’m proud of the tie-in this weekend with Kyle.”

“Yours was the first blog I read that gave me the confidence to talk openly about diabetes.  You, them, us as a group drive that conversation about diabetes and engagement.  Diabetes is a big part of what I do and who I am.  And [putting the names on the car] is an opportunity to encourage the story to be told.”

And Charlie told his story, and ours, by finishing 5th in the Indy 500.


Way to go, Charlie!!  Thank you for continuing to represent the diabetes community – we’re proud to be part of your team.

(all photos credited to credit to LAT Photography USA)

Diabetes Blog Week: Language and Diabetes.

Language and Diabetes:  There is an old saying that states “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me”. I’m willing to bet we’ve all disagreed with this at some point, and especially when it comes to diabetes. Many advocate for the importance of using non-stigmatizing, inclusive and non-judgmental language when speaking about or to people with diabetes. For some, they don’t care, others care passionately. Where do you stand when it comes to “person with diabetes” versus “diabetic”, or “checking” blood sugar versus “testing”, or any of the tons of other examples? Let’s explore the power of words, but please remember to keep things respectful.

(And for more on the topics of Diabetes Blog Week 2016, click here.)

Language matters.  The words we use matter.

Some words make me all fired up, like “consumer.”  I am a consumer when it comes to cars, or coats, or snow blowers.  When it comes to diabetes, I’m not a consumer.  I would never choose to consume these goods; they are chosen out of the desire to stay alive.  I don’t like “suffering from diabetes” because it makes me feel weak and compromised, which stands in contrast to where I prefer to anchor my emotions about diabetes.  And I totally hate the concept of “good” and “bad” blood sugars.  That whole ideology can fuck off in favor of “in range” and “out of range.”

I appreciate the word “complications” because its connotation is perfect for how I feel about diabetes-related complications; that shit is complicated.  I like the word “empowered” because it reminds me that I have a say in how this whole life maps out, diabetes or not.  I like any words and phrases that tie the physical aspects of diabetes to the emotional ones.  I latch on actively to “hope” versus fear.  And I like being called “Kerri” instead of “diabetic,” but hey, that’s just me.

(And I really like certain curse words, but I am trying to use those less, but it’s difficult.  I don’t make insulin, I do make use of curse words.  It’s a terrible habit, but one I am not changing.)

But it’s not about the words we shouldn’t use, or the ones that seem potentially loaded.  This morning, after hearing about the death of a fellow advocate (outside of the diabetes space), I’m spinning with thoughts of the words I wish I used more, the things I wish I said.  The things I should say.

Like “thanks for sharing this.”  I think this every time I read a blog post, or a Tweet, or a Facebook update from someone and it makes me stop and think.  The DOC is filled with voices that challenge what I thought I knew, and who teach me how to re-examine my chronic illness with grace and determination or perspective or humility … or all of it.  I like the way they think.  I like what they say.

And “How are you feeling today?”  I interact with a lot of people touched by illness – patients, consumers, caregivers … whatever word words for you in this way – and their stories touch me.  A lot of the time, I absorb what they’re saying and store it away in my head, but I want to reach out more, ask “how are you feeling today?”  I want the people in our community, and outside of it, to know how much I appreciate what it takes to share their stories, even when they are worn out by doing it, by living it.  A little ask goes a long way.

Or “You aren’t alone; how can I help?”  Because sometimes people share to get things off their chest (“I hate low blood sugars!”), but other times they reach out in hopes of someone reaching back (“I feel so alone with diabetes.”)  Words matter, and hearing, “You aren’t alone; how can I help?” might make a difference.

And “I’m sorry.”  Because I am.

But mostly “thank you” and sometimes, “I love you.”  Over the last few years, there have been people who have come and gone from my life that left lasting impressions, and I bet I didn’t tell them “thank you” and “I love you” nearly as much as I should have.  I know I thought it – thought it a lot after they were gone – but I should have said it then.  When they were here.  When they could hear me and understand the influence they’ve had on my life, the positive mark they’ve left on my existence, and the ways they’ve rocked my world for the better.

Words matter.  Stories matter.  People matter.  So thank you.  And even though you’re reading these words on a glowing screen and we’re communicating mostly through a digital medium, you are part of a community that has forever changed me.


Diabetes Blog Week: Message Monday.

It’s Diabetes Blog Week, a week in the year where diabetes bloggers can rally together and share their stories, following suggested (but not mandated!) themes and focusing on connecting with one another as a community.  And who better to closely knit our community together than Karen (who is known in my household as “The Knitter“)?  Karen kindly brings us closer on Diabetes Blog Week by inspiring others to raise their voices.  So let’s do that.

Message Monday:  Lets kick off the week by talking about why we are here, in the diabetes blog space. What is the most important diabetes awareness message to you? Why is that message important for you, and what are you trying to accomplish by sharing it on your blog? (Thank you, Heather Gabel, for this topic suggestion.)

My blog started back in May of 2005, admittedly mostly because I was lonely with diabetes.  I had lots of friends and community outside of my busted pancreas, but no one in my life who “got it.”  That frustrated me.  Made me feel lonely.  Contributed to feelings of isolation.

So I Googled “diabetes” and a long list of shit that would go wrong with my body as I aged came back as a search return.  Not fun.  At the time, I was 25 years old.  I wasn’t ready to think about my chronic illness in terms of a ticking clock.  I wanted more reasons to live, and live well, instead of reasons why I should tuck my islets between my legs (ew) and get ready to die.

Eff that.  I want to have a proper life after diagnosis, not one that’s dominated by fear.  Gimme some hope.

Which brought me to the blogosphere over a decade ago, and that desire to connect with people who intimately understand diabetes is what drives me to stay here.

Over the course of the last eleven years, my “message” has changed.  I’ve changed, so that makes sense.  When I was in my mid-twenties, I wanted to find others who were interviewing for jobs, starting relationships, living on their own, and making their way as an adult … with diabetes.  Confirming that a community existed, and was accessible, lit me up proper.

As I got older, I was interested in hearing about successful parenting with diabetes.  Not exclusively about pregnancy, because that’s not a thing for everyone, but about how families expanded through whatever means they felt were right, either through biological children, or adopted, or fostered, or kids of the decidedly furrier variety.  I really took a lot of pride in sharing my pregnancy six years ago, and again now, because it wasn’t perfect, or seamless, or without issue but hell, it was mine.  And it what I worked for.  And it was worth it.

When there were complications, I felt comforted by the community who had been there before me, and by the hope they provided as to life after diagnosis.  Same goes for diabetes-related depression.  Same goes for infertility.

Same goes for any moment in the last eleven years where I’ve felt alone or potentially isolated, but the community taps me on the shoulder and goes, “Wait.  You aren’t alone.  Turn around; we’re all in this together.”

There’s a level of support found in our community that I can’t properly say thank you for.  But I’m thankful.

Why am I here?  To share my story, as ever-changing as it may be.  To make a difference.  The stuff I share from my digital soapbox grows as I grow, leaving my goal simply to connect with my peers and to live well.  What am I trying to accomplish?  I still don’t know, but I have seen that I accomplish more, live more when I feel the support of community.

I don’t have a set “message,” but I do have a life, and it’s worth documenting if only to prove to myself that diabetes will not bring me down.

If anything, with the help of our community, I’ll force it to raise me up.


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