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Posts from the ‘Diabetes Advocacy’ Category

#WalkWithD: John’s Story.

A few weeks ago, I wrote about how I was seeking to learn more about my peers with diabetes, specifically folks with type 2 diabetes.  Living with type 1 diabetes myself, it’s hard to me to “walk a mile in their shoes,” so to speak, when I felt so uninformed about type 2 diabetes in the first place.  A few people left comments on that post, and I’ve been working to bring more of their journey with type 2 diabetes into the forefront, so I can learn from them, and so we can learn as a community. 

I want to know what it’s like to walk with type 2 diabetes, and today, John, a self-proclaimed 67 year old “youngster” and currently living in the southeast Alaska panhandle, is answering a few questions about what life is like for him.

Kerri:  Thanks for taking the time to chat with me today, John.  When were you diagnosed with type 2 diabetes?

John:  I think it was October 18, 2007.

Kerri:  Did you know anything about diabetes before your diagnosis?

John:  Yes a little, I had a cousin, uncle and a niece that had type 1 and even though I was a few years older than my niece we used to play together as children and were quite close.  I was also a babysitter to her when she was young.

Kerri:  How did your diagnosis impact you, physically?  How about emotionally?

John:  I was told to lose some pounds, I was 260 when diagnosed and they wanted me down to 190.  It took me almost a year to get 196 and I found that I couldn’t maintain it and feel comfortable at all, so I let my weight drift back up to about 210 and have remained at that weight ever since.

Emotionally?  I was relieved, I was having some heart problems and it seemed to me that it was getting worse and the doctors couldn’t figure out why.   Then one of the E.R. doctors noticed that every time I showed up in ER that my blood sugar was somewhat elevated.  That led to an A1c, which was off the chart.

Kerri:  Now that you are a few years into your diabetes journey, what have you learned along the way?

John:  Quite a lot about the disease, I at first researched Type 2 only and then I read an article about how diabetes progresses in the body if left unchecked and I thought at first that it was an article about Type 1, but then as I reread the article again I realized that it did not make any difference how the diagnoses was made it was the same disease.  The only difference was in how we each contracted it.  Right now, it is known that in the PWD’s T1, the immune system attacks the insulin producing cells of the pancreas  and destroys them, and, PWD’s T2’s there are several ways that the same cells are either destroyed or made to under-perform.  The end result is a disease called diabetes.  So I then stopped looking at it as the type of diabetes someone had and started to notice how they were treating their diabetes, so that I may be able to treat mine better.

Kerri:  What makes you want to tell people about your diabetes journey?  Why do you think it’s important for people with all kinds of diabetes to share their stories?

John:  My story is going to be similar to someone out there and just maybe that person needs to know that they are not alone.  The more people that stop being afraid of this disease and start letting people know that they have this disease the more that diabetes will be recognized as a viable threat to their own health.

Kerri:  What do you want people to know about life with type 2 diabetes?

John:  What I want everyone to realize is that I don’t have “type 2 diabetes” but that I do have “diabetes” and the way it came about is type 2(reason unknown).  I treat my diabetes just the same as many thousands of other diabetics and it does not make one bit of difference what type it is.  Being a certain type is good for person to person conversations in a give and take on how we treat our own version of diabetes and it’s good that our doctors know, but beyond that it’s useless.  Living with diabetes is not easy, it takes a lot of time that I would like to be doing other things.  It often times scares the heck out of me and it is not a set in stone science, it at times does things that seems to defy all reason and it will bite you if you don’t pay attention.  It never stops and that is the worst one, it is there all the time, no letup.  But with knowledge and the right tools it can be managed and quite well, just not controlled, at least not by me.

To every negative there should be a positive, my positive is that I am in better general health than almost all of my friends that don’t have diabetes, you see, I now take the time to take care of myself, eat right, exercise.  Before I was diagnosed with diabetes I never seemed to have the time to do those things.

Thank you so much for sharing, John, and I’m looking forward to sharing more perspectives from my type 2 peers in the coming weeks. 

If you are living with diabetes of any kind, please raise your voice.  Your story matters!  #walkwithd

#DOCasksFDA – Your Feedback is Needed, DOC!

THIS IS THE LINK TO THE SURVEYRead below for more information on the virtual discussion between the diabetes community and the FDA, and how your input will shape that discussion, and potentially our future.

“On November 3 from 1pm-4pm EDT, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the diabetes community will host an unprecedented event to discuss unmet needs in diabetes. As a community, our job is to present the numerous challenges we as patients face each day, and we need your opinions to be a part of this discussion! Please fill out this short survey to share your thoughts on what’s important to you when it comes to living with diabetes. Your feedback will go directly to FDA and help influence the conversation on November 3.

Please answer the questions that follow as honestly as you can. Your answers could affect the way the FDA perceives unmet needs in diabetes, and ultimately, how it reviews the risks and benefits of new drugs and devices.”

THIS IS THE LINK TO THE SURVEY AGAIN.  IT IS IN ALL CAPS BECAUSE IT IS IMPORTANT AND YOU ARE IMPORTANT AND YOUR OPINIONS ARE IMPORTANT.  As a community, we need to raise our voices.  Please show the FDA that we are many, we are empowered, and we are loud.

Link coming soon so that you can register for the discussion, but in the meantime, please fill out the survey and share it with your DOC friends.  And thanks!!

Guest Post: No Child Should Die of Diabetes.

Veerle Vanhuyse is off and running … literally.  Verlee lives with type 1 diabetes and is running the NYC Marathon in a few weeks, aiming to raise awareness and funds for the IDF’s Life for a Child program.  Today, I’m proud to be hosting a post from Veerle about her marathon goals!

*   *   *

A quarter of a century it’s been already but it still feels like yesterday. About to turn 16 and counting the days to leave for France with a bunch of teenagers to learn the language. I hadn’t been feeling well over the last few weeks and my trip to France became a trip to the hospital. Diabetes! I took my very first shot of insulin on my birthday. Sweet sixteen indeed!

In the beginning, I did really bad, didn’t take care of it at all. Only in my late twenties(!), I took diabetes more seriously and got my a1C’s from 9+ to 5%.

Eighteen years and a child later, I started running. And in eight years time I went from 100 meter and being exhausted (I’m not kidding), to 5K, 10K, half a marathon and finally the full monster; Berlin Marathon 2012.

That sad girl back in 1987 would’ve never guessed she would be doing what I’m about to do in one month:  Being at the start of the mother of all marathons, New York City 2014!

Needless to say, I am very excited about this upcoming event. But make no mistake, there’s no such thing as knowing exactly how to anticipate with the sugars before a long run, or any run for that matter. Every workout is different, depending on so many factors all diabetics deal with every single day.

Three weeks before the Berlin marathon, I suddenly realized I should grab the opportunity to raise money for diabetes. And I did. 1.700 euro went to research at the University Hospital in Leuven, Belgium. But this time I wanted to do something more specific. It didn’t take me long to find a new great goal. Surfing the web for a few hours I found a wonderful initiative called ‘Life for a Child’ supported by the International Diabetes Federation. I read about Dr. Marguerite De Clerck, a Belgian nun who spent the past 55 years treating children with diabetes in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

It instantly hit me! THIS was a project I immediately believed in and I wanted to make a difference for.  In the end my goal is comparable to the wonderful Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign: Provide children and youth in developing countries the basic care they need to stay alive with diabetes.

So far, I raised 2.500 euro, and I’m working really hard to at least double this amount.  I’m hoping to help families in Kinshasa keeping their loved ones alive.

It is a clear message: No child should die of diabetes.

*   *   *

I asked Veerle to provide a bio, and the one she sent to me in first person language was too laced with passion to edit in any way.

Here’s Veerle, according to Verlee:  “There’s the Belgian, so called ‘outgoing’ 43 year old, who talks a lot and who’s always in for a joke. And there is the T1 diabetic since 27 years, who can be really sad about the battle she has to fight against the disease every single day. “She deals with it really well,” people – even close to me – would say. They have no idea. One way to “deal with it” is running ! A lot! And in less than 4 weeks, I’ll be living my dream: NYC marathon ! Last race, because there’s also arthritis in my foot now. With this last 42,195km, I’ll be raising money for Life for a Child, to provide children in Kinshasa with the necessary supplies, proper care, and some decent education they need so badly. I am extremely passionate about it, and I want to scream as hard as I can: Please people, read my website and find it in your heart to donate, donate, donate!!!”

To donate to Veerle’s efforts, please visit this link on her websiteThanks for raising awareness, Veerle!

All About that Cure.

Ever stumble upon an ear worm while you’re waiting in the airport?  For me, it’s usually something like “On the Wings of Love” that ends up embedded into my brain for hours on end (thank you, Mr. Osborne) but yesterday morning it was “All About that Bass.”  Except it was with a diabetes twist, thanks to a JDRF walk team in Tucson, AZ:

To support their team, visit their walk page.  In the meantime, jam out to their earworm.

 

February Comes Fast.

Chris always sums up Spare a Rose in the same way:  “It’s so simple. So sticky. And so important.”

Because it is.

February is fast-approaching (Don’t act like you don’t know – it’s October today!  Time refuses to stand still.) and now is the time to start thinking about how you and your company can participate in the Spare a Rose campaign next Valentine’s Day.  February 1 – 14th.

Yeah, I said you and your company.  This topic came up on a call a few months ago, about opening the campaign to offices and employers.  “Earn a casual dress day for your office!” sort of sentiments (except when I pitched this idea to a super cool Austin PR firm, it sort of backfired because their dress code is already casual, so I recommended a Wear a Tux to Work day).  Put an empty flower vase on the front desk with a sign that says, “Best bouquet of roses I’ve ever received!!” with a link to SpareARose.org.  There are a lot of fun ways to bring awareness and funding for Life for a Child.

Also, now is a perfect time to bring up Spare A Rose to media outlets who might be planning their editorial calendars for next year already.  If you’d like to see the campaign highlighted in your magazine of choice, reach out to the editor and let them know about it.

You can sign up to receive updates on the campaign here.

You can learn more about the In My Office ideas here.

Want some beautiful images?  Here you go.

Here’s a handy FAQ about Spare a Rose.

It’s a simple sentiment with tremendous outcome:  spare a rose, save a child.  Thanks for thinking ahead to February and being part of the solution.

 

Seeking PWD Peers.

Two weeks ago, I was in Vienna for the third annual European Animas Blogger Summit.  (I’m a blogger, and I have a working relationship with Animas.  Only missing the European part, and I can’t even pretend because I was once told that my attempt at a British accent was akin to Dick Van Dyke’s Mary Poppins attempt.  So, no.)  Other folks who were in attendance have written about their impressions and take-aways, but the discussions we had can’t be concisely covered in a blog post.  It would take several blog posts.

So, in keeping with that theme, this blog post is centered around one of the discussions that embedded itself into my head:  connecting with PWD who are living with type 2 diabetes.

It started with a conversation about the #walkwithd campaign.

“The Walk with D campaign is about showing people what diabetes is really like, peeling back the stigma and reinstating dignity.  We do this already through blogs and Twitter and Facebook updates and all of the photos we share with our community and society as a whole.  The hashtag is simply a way to link some of these discussions, and to share more.  But, in looking around the room, I see a lot of kindred spirits who are dealing with type 1 diabetes.  Where are the type 2 voices?”

I don’t know much at all about life with type 2 diabetes. Sure, I can look it up on dLife or WebMD or some other resource that gives a high-level definition of type 2 diabetes, but that doesn’t give me a sense of what it’s actually like to live with type 2 diabetes.

My lack of perspective used to be rooted in straight up ignorance.  Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as a child, I actively sought to separate myself from my type 2 peers because I didn’t want people thinking “I did this to myself.”  And I have to put that statement in quotes because it’s such a crummy one, now that I know so much more about the differences and similarities between all types of diabetes.

It’s difficult to talk about how I felt when people lumped type 1 and type 2 together.  I’m embarrassed to admit these things.  The diseases are different in their origin but so similar in how they map out physically, and more importantly, emotionally, and I wish I had known that earlier.  I wish I had been more supportive of my type 2 peers.  I wish I had known how they felt.

And that’s the part I truly want to better understand.  How does it FEEL to live with type 2?

Rachel at Refreshing D was one of the first people who had type 2 diabetes who I really got to know.  Through her columns at dLife, her blog, and through becoming friends, I had a reliable window into life with type 2 diabetes.  I don’t know if I can properly articulate how much she has taught me, or thank her for being brave enough to share her story.  With Rachel as my gateway to understanding type 2 diabetes, I connected to and learned from people like Travis, Sue, Kate, and Bob.  People who live with diabetes – just not the type I’m familiar with – but who I need to better understand in order to best understand this community.

“I wish more people with type 2 would raise their voices.  How can we encourage them to?  How can we empower them to?”

The discussion during the blogger summit was frustrating in that none of us had a clear answer, but we realized that the responsibility for creating an empowering and inviting environment was on the DOC, both globally and in our respective countries.  We, as people with type 1 diabetes, are smaller in number in society but we tend to dominate the Diabetes Online Community, and I think it’s up to us to help pave the way for people with type 2 diabetes to feel comfortable coming out of their diabetes cave and sharing their perspectives.  Stigma runs rampant regarding diabetes, but we can help change it from the inside by getting to know our peers.  Finding what unites us can help us better understand one another as people and can help us all feel like we’re part of a community that has our back.

If you’re living with type 2 diabetes and you’re reading this post, please share your journey.

I walk with diabetes, but I don’t walk alone.  And neither do you.

CGM in the Cloud and All Over the Web.

diaTribe has posted a new column about CGM in the Cloud and the why (and why not) of clouding your Dexcom data, and thanks to a lot of input from people in the diabetes community, there are a dozen different perspectives.  Click over to diaTribe for a read.

And diaTribe isn’t the only site talking about CGM in the Cloud this week.

Why wait?  #WeAreNotWaiting.

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