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Posts from the ‘Dexcom’ Category

Free Shower.

(to the tune of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ Free Fallin’)

He’s a good pump, does his job well
Loves priming and bolusing too.
He’s a good pump, crazy ‘bout islets
Gives insulin when those islets don’t come through.

It’s a long week being my Dex sensor
There’s adhesive workin’ while I play
And I’m a happy girl cause I don’t even miss them
I’m a happy girl on site change day

And I’m free, free showerin’
Yeah I’m free, free showerin’

All devices are sitting on my counter
Going nowhere until I put them on my bod.
And all the good pumps are taking their short leave
And all the good sensors are still in plastic sleeves

‘Cause I’m free, free showerin’
Yeah I’m free, free showerin’

Free showerin’, now I’m free showerin’
Now I’m free showerin’, now I’m free showerin’

I’m gonna dry off and refill my cartridge
I’m gonna peel back adhesive tapey rings
I’m gonna free shower but then when it’s over
I’ll reconnect with these live-saving things.

For now I’m free, free showerin’
Yeah I’m free, free showerin’

Yeah I’m free, free showerin’
Oh! Free showerin’
Now I’m free
Oh!
Free showerin’

Dexcom Adhesive, Activated!

Nothing to see here, especially if you’re looking for an adhesive-related Dexcom rash. Because ever since switching to the sensors that expire after 8/17/17, the rash is a thing of the past.

Now I can wear my sensors for the recommended seven days (sometimes stretching it a day or two here and there, if I’m feeling bold), and my skin is fine when I remove the thing.

Great joy! YAY!!!!

However, if I add any Opsite Flexifix tape, that’s suddenly causing an irritation. It’s like the reverse of what was happening for years.  So.  Close.

But it’s awesome to be adhesive itch-free after almost five years of scratchy-scratch.  Life without blistering skin reactions, Toughpads, and welts that last for over a week is so much nicer.

The only downside to the new post-08/15/17 expiration sensors is that the adhesive itself seems to be weaker.  For the first time in years, I had a sensor go loose and yawn off my skin after 10 hours of wear.

A quick call to the Dexcom customer care team was quick to replace this sensor, thankfully.  And I learned something random on the phone call.

“Are you pressing down on the sensor adhesive after application?” the customer service guy asked.

“Yes, I am.”

“Oh good.  That helps activate the sensor adhesive,” he said.

“It activates it?”

“Yes, and that’s what helps it stay stuck.”

Huh.  I’d only heard that once before (earlier in the day, from Abby in the instagram comments section), but apparently it’s true.  In order to DEXCOM ADHESIVE, ACTIVATE!, you need to press down on the adhesive part.  Is that common knowledge or just instinctively done by most Dexcom users?  For me, it was just something I did without thinking, kind of like riding a bike.

tl;dr – The rash is gone. Make sure you press on your sensor adhesive.  Write a blog post about it once in a while to confirm that the rash is still MIA.  And long live sensors that expire after 08/15/17!

Your moop or mine?

The first flight out was jumbly, with the plane riding into some kind of air pocket right after takeoff, eliciting audible screams from some of us.  (No, not from me.  Turns out that, if things get scary, I resort to frantically saying the F word under my breath whilst clutching the arm rest.)  Once the plane hit some smooth air, everyone breathed a little easier and tried to mellow out.

In the silence of folks calming down, I heard that low, moop sound that the Dexcom G5 app makes when it is ready to be calibrated, like the sonar ping from a submarine.  It’s subtle but unmistakable.

Moop.

My sensor was fine when I boarded the plane.  I pulled out my phone anyway, just to make sure my CGM wasn’t crying for attention.  Huh.  Not me.  Sliding the phone back into my purse, my peripheral vision caught the movements of the woman next to me, who had her phone in hand and I could see the little pigeon head I knew by heart.

“Type 1?”

She grinned.  “Yeah.”

“Me, too.  Since I was seven.”

“I was 13.”

“I thought it was my CGM that needed to be calibrated,” I said, gesturing towards my phone.  “But it was you this time.”


It’s the thread that runs through all of us, that instant and unfettered understanding of the thing that simmers on the back burner some days and threatens to burn the house down on others.  I know that feeling. So did the woman next to me.

Instantly, she became familiar. I didn’t know her name or where she lived or what kind of history she brought on board with her, but there was an instant connection of, “Yeah, me too. I know that thing you have. I also moop.  And beep. And check. And worry. And celebrate. And dose. And fight. And laugh. And keep perspective. And move on.”

What to Work On.

I’ve gotten lazy in my diabetes management.  And I’m not proud of it.  My recent A1C result was still in my goal range but not where it was a few months ago, and I’d love to return to that level of control.  Thing is, I’ve gone soft when it comes to following through on my daily diabetes duties.

Yeah.  I’m at that point in the postpartum recovery thing:  finding ways to up my diabetes game.

I can check two things off my to do list with confidence:  I wear  my Dexcom every, single day and I also have been on top of my doctor’s appointments.  Those two things get big, fat gold stars.

Other stuff needs some grooming, though.  Here’s my wishlist:

  • Check fasting BG immediately after waking up.
  • Calibrate CGM right when it requests calibration.
  • Pre-bolus at least 15 minutes before eating.
  • Exercise 3 – 5 times a week.
  • Sleep more than 5 hours a night.
  • React faster to the high alarm from my Dexcom.
  • Rotate my device sites better.
  • Remember to eat more than coffee before 1 pm.

Hmmm.  That’s a lot.  Plan of attack for each:

  • Check fasting BG immediately after waking up.  We just moved the little Guy out of our bedroom and now he’s sleeping in his crib in his own room, so I have a little more time (3 min versus zero min) in the morning before I have to run and grab him.  I need to return to the habit of keeping my glucose meter on the bathroom counter and using it before I brush my teeth in the morning.
  • Calibrate CGM right when it requests calibration.  Ugh.  This just requires being less of a lazy tool and just checking/calibrating ASAP instead of ignoring the little red blood drop.
  • Pre-bolus at least 15 minutes before eating. This one is admittedly going to be challenging, as my schedule is a little non-scheduley these days.  My son is a busy little creature and also unpredictable, so it’s challenging to find the “right time” to do things like change out my insulin pump, eat breakfast, schedule conference calls.  But as he gets older, he does seem to be settling into something resembling a pattern, so maybe this will get easier.  I’ll try to pre-bolus.
  • Exercise 3 – 5 times a week.  This one is already going in the right direction.  As mentioned, I joined a gym and that gym has childcare, so there’s no excuse.  Except days like over the weekend, when I was away for work, or today, when the little Guy is so sniffling and booger-gross that I don’t want to bring him to the daycare and expose any other kids/adults to his germs.  We did go for a walk around the neighborhood today, clocking in at least a little bit of exercise, so that helps.  The weather warming up will help here, too.  This bullet point is one I’m putting like half a gold star on.
  • Sleep more than 6 hours a night.  OH HA HA HA HA.  The baby thinks 5.30 am is when human beings should wake up.  The early morning hours are gorgeous and I love the quiet of being awake that early, but around 10 pm my body starts to give up on doing body things, although I rarely make it to bed before 11.30 pm.  I need to work on this sleep thing.
  • React faster to the high alarm from my Dexcom.  Again, this one is something I just have to DO.  No excuses and no reason not to.  My high alarm used to be 140 mg/dL (pre-pregnancy and during pregnancy), but I’ve moved it to 180 mg/dL in the last few months.  I should be responding to 180s.  I will work on this.
  • Rotate my device sites better.  Yep, this is also a need.  My thighs have become a permanent home for my Dexcom sensors, but I am okay with the back of my hip or maybe my arm.  I’ll try to get creative.  As far as pump sites, I’ve been working on rotating those better, too.  Maybe it’s time to try a lower arm site?  (Has anyone ever done that and does it hurt??)
  • Remember to eat more than coffee before 1 pm.  Yeah, this is another whoops.  My mornings are generally a bit crazy, and sometimes I’d rather keep my CGM graph steady instead of interrupting it with breakfast.  But this is backfiring because I then get so hungry around lunch time that I eat the fridge, causing a nasty post-lunch bounce.  Moderation here.  Eat regularly throughout the day and I’ll be less likely to unhinge my jaws and devour the contents of the cupboard.

I hope writing this crap down will help up my accountability and will inspire me to keep moving forward.  If I can make one or two of these become habit in the next few weeks, I’ll mark that as a success.  Because backwards is all gross and disgusting feeling and also it looks like there’s a c-section back there and I am NOT going back to that.

The Follow Up About Dexcom.

Today is Day 7.  I’ll be pulling this sensor off in six hours.

Day 7. No filter. No rash. No worries. #dexcom

A post shared by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

No rash.  No filter.  Does this mean no worries?

(For reference, this post is a follow up from a week ago when I put on a Dexcom G5 sensor and transmitter without a barrier underneath the sensor.  For the last four and a half years, I’ve had an allergic/irritation response to the sensor.  Big, scaly rashes would blister up and take weeks to heal … like the one currently on my left thigh.  But rumor had it that sensors with an expiration date past 8/17/2017 were not causing this rash reaction.  

So I tried a 11/2017 expiration-dated sensor and the result?  No rash. NO RASH! The only issue I noticed was some blood around the transmitter after inserting it, but I wonder if that happens more often than I realize and the Toughpad had previously kept the blood from being visible. Whatever the case, I’m not itchy yet and I’m really, really hopeful that this rash issue is tabled forever. Next question is what to do with the box of sensors that has a pre-August 2017 expiration date …)

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