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Posts from the ‘Blood Sugars’ Category

Useless Juice.

We don’t drink juice “for fun” in our house; it’s only for low blood sugars, considered almost as medicinal as the insulin hiding out in the butter compartment of our fridge.

So when I came home with these juice boxes unintentionally, I was pissed.

35% less sugar?  That’s exactly what I don’t want!

Useless juice.  I’m bringing it back and swapping it out for the fixes-a-40mg/dL-at-4am kind of juice.  The high octane juice.  Proper juice.

Hips Don’t Lie.

“You’re early for your appointment!”  The receptionist looked at me hopefully.  “Less nervous this time?”

(My track record as a nervous dental patient follows me everywhere.)

“Yep.  I’m early.  And I have a babysitter this morning for my kid.  I have to follow through now!”

Over the last seven years or so, I’ve finally hit stride with my dentist visits.  Very sensitive teeth and an obsession with flossing and brushing at home made me feel invincible, skipping cleanings because they were painful and only showing up for emergency dental appointments (like this).  But I’ve been trying to practice what I preach about preventative care, so showing up every six months for cleanings and scheduling repairs immediately is my new jam.

It helps that the dentists I’ve seen over the last few years have been very receptive to requests for more novocaine during repairs or sensitivity-reducing pastes during cleanings. When the procedures aren’t painful, I’ll follow through on all of them.  Which is what brought me to the dentist yesterday:  a very old filling on my back-most molar had come loose, in need of a redo.  As soon as it popped off, I made an appointment, wrangled coverage for my little Guy, and marched into the dentist armed with good blood sugars and my copay up front.

“Can I just duck into your ladies room before going in to see Dr. Fang? [Not his real name, of course.  But holy shit, I wish it was.]”

“Sure thing.  We’ll be calling you in about 15 minutes.”

In the bathroom, I went to de-pants (?), forgetting about the fresh, new pump site on the back of my right hip.  It was exactly where my waistband hit.  Which is why I deftly ripped it off when removing my pants.  Hips don’t lie.  They also don’t like infusion sets.

NEVER FEAR!  BACK UP PEN IS HERE!

Riding a wave of arrogance because I was ready for my dentist appointment and also because I knew I had an insulin pen in my meter case, I checked my CGM graph to see if I needed a little boost before my filling.  (Dentist appointments make me feel nervous, which causes my blood sugar to rise, so I expected to see an upward arrow.)  Sure enough, I was 160 mg/dL with double arrows up.

A unit will fix this right quick.

I pulled the pen cap off and saw a pen needle already screwed in.  Hmmmm.  I knew I’d used this pen when traveling in April.  Had that needle been on there for over a month?  I turned the dial on my Humalog pen to find it spongy and sticky.

Shit.  The last time I had a pen with a sticky dial, it was the result of an old needle cap that had contributed to built up pressure in the pen cartridge.  When it happened previously, I called the pharma company hotline and they advised me to check the rubber stopper on the cartridge.  I did that this time and saw that it was bulging.  I tried to push a unit into the air but nothing came out.  The pen was clogged.  No other pen.  No backup infusion set.

Awesome.  Insulin right there for the taking but no way to access it.  And my blood sugar was climbing aggressively.

“I need to run to my car for a second; is that okay?” I asked the receptionist.

She nodded, eyeing me skeptically.  “You’re coming back in, aren’t you?  Or are you making a run for it?”

“Nope.  I will be back in,” I promised.

The center console of my car is a treasure trove of crap:  lip gloss, spare diapers and wipes, glucose tabs, mints, packets of Truvia, a GPS from 2009 that wouldn’t be able to get me out of my garden never mind to a specific location, and the odd lancet or needle tip.  I was hoping to find one of those needle tips hiding in there, all sharp and new and ready to de-bulge the insulin pen pressure.

And there it was, crammed in the back corner of the console trench, unsure of how old it was but with the paper tab still over the base, so I knew it was unused.

Back in the dentist’s bathroom, I stashed my now-disconnected pump in my purse and was able to steal a unit and a half from my insulin pen (after a test bolus that exploded out of the pen and into the air – I’m sure I heard it yell, “Weeeeeee!!”), heading the high off at the pass.

Thankful for my packrat tendencies, I was called in for my appointment and after 45 minutes of drilling and scraping and refilling and novocaine and polite “Are you okay’s” from the dentist and mangled “mmm hmmm’s” from me, my tooth was filled and my blood sugar wasn’t garbage.

The moral of this toothy tale?  Bring backups of all your diabetes crap when you leave the house.  You never know when you’ll need to forage in the center console for drug paraphernalia.

DBlogWeek 2017: Diabetes and The Unexpected.

Diabetes Blog Week prompt for Monday: Diabetes can sometimes seem to play by a rulebook that makes no sense, tossing out unexpected challenges at random.  What are your best tips for being prepared when the unexpected happens?  Or, take this topic another way and tell us about some good things diabetes has brought into your, or your loved one’s, life that you never could have expected?

Diabetes Blog Week YAYYYYYY!

Unexpectedly, my iPhone decided to update itself on Saturday night.

I must have “agreed” to terms of service and scheduled the update, but I didn’t think the process through, because if my phone is updating the operating system, that means the processes on my phone are sort of stalled.

Including my Dexcom data transmission.  Which means I didn’t have any CGM data streaming overnight.  The low blood sugar came out of nowhere, a product of stupid poor planning and over-correcting a high in the wee hours of the morning.

Mother’s Day morning broke open with my body outlined in damp sweat, my color ashy, hands shaking, but my mind still sharp, considering my blood sugar was 35 mg/dL.

Super low glucose result - crappy way to start the dayOnly once or twice before, in thirty years of diabetes, have I ever felt close to passing out, but the precursor feelings seem to be waves of unconsciousness that lap at the edge of my mind coupled with a calm, reasoned mind, as if I knew I was about to go under and I needed to mentally take the biggest breath I could.

I had the sense to call Chris (he was downstairs with the baby) and ask him for juice.  I was afraid to sit up, thinking that might be enough to tip me into the abyss.

I asked him to put the baby in the crib in case I needed physical help.  I spoke to him through a mouthful of glucose tab dust, asking if he knew how to use the glucagon on the bedside table.  He said yes.  I asked if he could please hand me a towel so I could mop the sweat off my forehead.  The whole discussion was so calm, so structured, so oddly practical in contrast to the panic of being intensely low, the voice in the back of my mind screaming “AAAHHHHHHHHH!”

Makes me think I could solve quadratic equations while putting out a car fire while sitting in said car.  And the car is moving.  Fast.

Actually, that’s sort of what we do when severely hypo.

Unconsciousness due to a low blood sugar is the unexpected I think about the least, but prepare for the most.  I mean, I think about it, but not obsessively.  I just prepare all over the place, just-in-casing myself with juice boxes and raisins stashed in my frequently visited spots.  I try to always have fast-acting sugars on hand no matter where I am.  I share my CGM data while traveling. I keep that glucagon shot on the bedside table.

We’d talked about glucagon a few weeks early, after I’d refilled my prescription.  We almost used it when I was throwing up from the flu and my blood sugar was stuck at 45 mg/dL, not able to keep down the juice or tabs I was consuming.  It’s part of planning for the scary moments while simultaneously pretending, “Oh, that could never happen.”

Eventually, my blood sugar came up.  Exhausted from treading the hypo-waters for so long, I almost immediately fell back asleep on the damp pillowcase.  When I woke up again, I looked over at the glucagon kit, thankful for the fact that it was still sealed and hoping it continues to collect dust.

What to Work On.

I’ve gotten lazy in my diabetes management.  And I’m not proud of it.  My recent A1C result was still in my goal range but not where it was a few months ago, and I’d love to return to that level of control.  Thing is, I’ve gone soft when it comes to following through on my daily diabetes duties.

Yeah.  I’m at that point in the postpartum recovery thing:  finding ways to up my diabetes game.

I can check two things off my to do list with confidence:  I wear  my Dexcom every, single day and I also have been on top of my doctor’s appointments.  Those two things get big, fat gold stars.

Other stuff needs some grooming, though.  Here’s my wishlist:

  • Check fasting BG immediately after waking up.
  • Calibrate CGM right when it requests calibration.
  • Pre-bolus at least 15 minutes before eating.
  • Exercise 3 – 5 times a week.
  • Sleep more than 5 hours a night.
  • React faster to the high alarm from my Dexcom.
  • Rotate my device sites better.
  • Remember to eat more than coffee before 1 pm.

Hmmm.  That’s a lot.  Plan of attack for each:

  • Check fasting BG immediately after waking up.  We just moved the little Guy out of our bedroom and now he’s sleeping in his crib in his own room, so I have a little more time (3 min versus zero min) in the morning before I have to run and grab him.  I need to return to the habit of keeping my glucose meter on the bathroom counter and using it before I brush my teeth in the morning.
  • Calibrate CGM right when it requests calibration.  Ugh.  This just requires being less of a lazy tool and just checking/calibrating ASAP instead of ignoring the little red blood drop.
  • Pre-bolus at least 15 minutes before eating. This one is admittedly going to be challenging, as my schedule is a little non-scheduley these days.  My son is a busy little creature and also unpredictable, so it’s challenging to find the “right time” to do things like change out my insulin pump, eat breakfast, schedule conference calls.  But as he gets older, he does seem to be settling into something resembling a pattern, so maybe this will get easier.  I’ll try to pre-bolus.
  • Exercise 3 – 5 times a week.  This one is already going in the right direction.  As mentioned, I joined a gym and that gym has childcare, so there’s no excuse.  Except days like over the weekend, when I was away for work, or today, when the little Guy is so sniffling and booger-gross that I don’t want to bring him to the daycare and expose any other kids/adults to his germs.  We did go for a walk around the neighborhood today, clocking in at least a little bit of exercise, so that helps.  The weather warming up will help here, too.  This bullet point is one I’m putting like half a gold star on.
  • Sleep more than 6 hours a night.  OH HA HA HA HA.  The baby thinks 5.30 am is when human beings should wake up.  The early morning hours are gorgeous and I love the quiet of being awake that early, but around 10 pm my body starts to give up on doing body things, although I rarely make it to bed before 11.30 pm.  I need to work on this sleep thing.
  • React faster to the high alarm from my Dexcom.  Again, this one is something I just have to DO.  No excuses and no reason not to.  My high alarm used to be 140 mg/dL (pre-pregnancy and during pregnancy), but I’ve moved it to 180 mg/dL in the last few months.  I should be responding to 180s.  I will work on this.
  • Rotate my device sites better.  Yep, this is also a need.  My thighs have become a permanent home for my Dexcom sensors, but I am okay with the back of my hip or maybe my arm.  I’ll try to get creative.  As far as pump sites, I’ve been working on rotating those better, too.  Maybe it’s time to try a lower arm site?  (Has anyone ever done that and does it hurt??)
  • Remember to eat more than coffee before 1 pm.  Yeah, this is another whoops.  My mornings are generally a bit crazy, and sometimes I’d rather keep my CGM graph steady instead of interrupting it with breakfast.  But this is backfiring because I then get so hungry around lunch time that I eat the fridge, causing a nasty post-lunch bounce.  Moderation here.  Eat regularly throughout the day and I’ll be less likely to unhinge my jaws and devour the contents of the cupboard.

I hope writing this crap down will help up my accountability and will inspire me to keep moving forward.  If I can make one or two of these become habit in the next few weeks, I’ll mark that as a success.  Because backwards is all gross and disgusting feeling and also it looks like there’s a c-section back there and I am NOT going back to that.

Body Wars.

The Good:  Birdy’s seventh birthday party went off without a hitch.  The cake was made, the guests were fed, the bouncy castle was a source of glee for kids and adults alike, and my daughter spent the day red-faced from jumping, laughing with her friends, and covered in cake frosting.  Cannot ask for more than that.

The Bad:  On Friday morning, my right eye was sore and puffy and those familiar “corneal tear” feelings were close to the surface.  Sometimes this happens and my eye settles down after a few hours (after lots of preservative free tear drops and very little screen time).  And other times, this means the eyeball is cooked and the cornea is going to fully tear.

Which it did.  Friday afternoon, I was lucky enough to get in with my local ophthalmologist, and being the hero human that he is, he was able to confirm the tear, give me some antibiotic drops to help minimize swelling and speed up healing, and then he slapped a bandage contact on my eye so I could function almost normally.  “Your vision out of that eye will be cloudy because of the contact, but hopefully the pain will be greatly reduced.  Come see me next week and we’ll take it out before you travel again.”

Awesome.  This went from bad to better.  Thank goodness for modern medicine.  (More on the eye thing in a bit because that’s an ongoing story.)

Emergency eye appointment (torn cornea, round 8). PWD everywhere … even in the magazines. #waitingwithdiabetes

A post shared by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

The Ugly:  Armed with the bandage contact and a babysitter, we took Birdy out on Friday night for a show she wanted to see.  And she loved it.  And we loved it (as much as parents love kids’ shows sort of thing).  And about halfway through the show, I decided I didn’t love it because my stomach was churning and my blood sugars were rising quickly.

Figuring I had a busted infusion set or maybe this was a blood sugar response to eye pain, I sat in the lobby for the rest of the show and tried to get my head straight and stomach settled.

But on the ride home from Providence, my purse went from carrying my wallet and car keys to holding my puke.  Not my best moment.  But it all went in the bag so that’s something.

And for the rest of Friday night, well into Saturday morning, my body spent those hours rejecting all of its contents.  I haven’t thrown up from being sick in at least 15 years (the only times I’ve vomited in the last whatever decades have been after c-sections).  This was a whole new and horrible party, which gave way to severe dehydration (despite sucking down diet flat ginger ale and water), fever, high blood sugars, and small to moderate ketones.

I spent Saturday in bed, sleeping or throwing up, while my kid’s birthday party took place outside.  It took about 48 hours to fully clear this bug, and the aftermath still included ketones and a general dizziness.  And it totally threw me because I’m usually able to work through sickness pretty quickly, if I get sick at all.  I don’t ever spend the day in bed, unable to stand up because I’m too weak or too sick to eat.  This was gross and new territory for me.  And it forced a quick and necessary review of the sick day rules.

This is what 24 hrs of violent vomiting did to my blood sugars. #insulinbecamewater

A post shared by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

The Recap:  The circus of vomiting has stopped.  My blood sugars, thanks to a 200% basal rate and some injections and plenty of hydration and vigilant ketone testing, have come down quite a bit and hopefully will be less offensive soon.  My family seems to have escaped the germs so far; hopefully locking myself into the master bedroom and hiding like The Big Man on Campus helped. No cats have puked yet. And once this eyeball heals up, diabetes can go back to being the top health dog.

… oh, and I cleaned out my purse.  I plan to keep using it.  And I’ll never tell you which one it is.

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