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Posts from the ‘Blood Sugars’ Category

Stress!!!! and Diabetes.

Do your blood sugars respond to food?  Of course.  How about to insulin?  And exercise?  A big “hell yes” to those, too.  Food, insulin, and exercise have tangible influence on my blood sugar levels.  But one influencer that I don’t often take into account is stress … which is a ridiculous variable for me to ignore because stress can make my blood sugars leap over tall basal rates in a single bound.

Oh look – a video!

How does stress change the mapping of your blood sugars?

The Last Straw.

“Mommy … I had a nightmare.”

She shows up in the middle of the night sometimes, evicted from her warm bed down the hall due to a nightmare.  “I had a dream about a blue monster with no arms and popcorn on his feet.”  She’s clutching her blanket, her water, a flashlight, and a stuffed animal; clearly she’s in for the long haul.

I moved over in the bed and she started to climb in.

“Oh and mom?  You’re low,” she said, handing me the vibrating pump.

The fog of feeling sleep lifted immediately and I recognized the symptoms of this hypo.  Sweaty hairline, fumbling fingers, my sight reduced to a tunnel, and my hearing razor-sharp, hearing the shuffle of my daughter’s feet, the steady breathing of my sleeping husband, and – finally – the buzzing buzzery of my CGM alarm.

“Do you need something?” Chris asked from beside me.

“Yeah – can you grab one of those juice boxes from the shelf?”

Birdy was already snuggled in beside me, nestled close against my hypo-damp shoulder.  A few seconds later, Chris returned with a juice box in hand.

Habit, habit, habit – I am a creature of it.  When my blood sugar is low, I go through the motions to treat it, and if anything gaffs up the routine, I’m thrown.  Lows in hotel rooms rock me because the bedside table is five inches farther from me than at home.  When I am home, having the glucose tabs on the table itself instead of in the drawer can be enough to confuse me thoroughly.  (Lows make me the least-sharp knife in the drawer.)  In this case, I grabbed the juice box firmly and reflexively used my other hand to reach for the little plastic sleeve with the straw tucked inside.  Only I grabbed it a little too firmly and juice shot out all over the bed, because my forward-thinking husband had already stuck the straw inside the foil hole.

“Shit …”  My pillow was wet with juice.  And so was my daughter, because I managed to (ocean?)-spray her in the face during this transaction.  “I didn’t know the straw was already in there.”

“Do you need another juice box?”

“No, this should be okay.  Only a little bit flew out.”  I drank the rest of the juice box, per routine.

“MOM. This is not OKAY.  I am all WET.”  (Even at 3 am, my kid can be indignant.)

“Sorry, baby.  You can go back to your own bed, if you want?  That bed doesn’t have juice in it.”

She thought for a minute, then buried her head under the blankets to issue a muffled response.  “No WAY.  The monster had popcorn feet.  NO WAY am I going back to my bed.”

 

 

All Night Long.

Some nights just plain suck.

In related news, I brushed my teeth ten times last night.

Sleep Cycle Your Face.

A normal sleep cycle:

Which is what I thought I had last night, until I woke up and saw evidence on the bedside table that suggested otherwise:

And then I remembered the whole thing:  normal sleep pattern interrupted by one very sweaty low, followed quickly by a  juice box, then another low a few hours later, and another juice box, and one moment to clean my teeth of the sugar consumed.

Making it look more like this:

Daylight savings time doesn’t have anything on a stubborn hypoglycemic event.

104 mg/dL.

Am I the only one who stops when this number pops up on a glucose meter and thinks, “Damn.  That could be on the meter advertisement box.  I’ve got this.”

Meter box advertisement #latergram

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

(Ignore the fact that I will surely be low, or high, or somewhere not exactly 104 mg/dL in a matter of hours.  But in that moment, I’ve got this.  Actually, since writing my post the other day, I’ve been actively working to spend more time in range and I’m seeing better results.  Averages are tipping back into my favor, and I’m reminded once again how much of diabetes is a total crap shoot and how much is something I can change … and how much those ratios of crap:change fluctuate.)

That Escalated Quickly.

After downloading and uploading and reloading all my device data to Diasend, I’ve seen the Big Picture, and it kind of blows.

For a good, long clip, things have been completely fine.  In range most of the time, not too many gross lows, and highs were classified as an extended 180 mg/dL, with symptoms to boot.  Well done!  Diabetes on point!  Celebrate by shoveling snow!

But a hiccup here and there have given way to a slippery slope of fuckery.  My two week average a month ago was fine.  My two week average yesterday was gross and not at all where I want it (and know I can have it).

I’m glad I’ve looked at my data, because I’m not sure I would have noticed just how dodgy things had become.  (And a quiet but still curmudgeonish thank you to the need for a flurry of paperwork in order to get my new insulin pump through insurance approval, forcing me to provide blood sugar logs and other data points in order to convince my insurance company that yes, I do have type 1 diabetes.)

I didn’t realize how much higher my two week average had become until I looked at it and recognized the need for change.  Two weeks for me makes a big difference, because it’s in that time frame where I make crappy tendencies into crappy habits.  Ignoring high alarms is okay for a day, but not for a week.  Forgetting to pre-bolus can roll by a few times but more than that equals out to crummy postprandials.  Carby food choices that are lackadaisically carb-counted brings on the blood sugar roller coaster.

Eff that noise.

Time to deescalate this.  Quickly.  Before it becomes as piled on as the three foot mound of snow on the back deck.

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