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Guest Post: Mindy Bartleson on Chronic Illness, Mental Heath, and Removing the Rose Colored Glasses

Mindy is self-publishing an honest book about growing up with chronic illness and mental health. She wrote the content before rose colored glasses impacted her experiences too much.  Today, she’s sharing the why behind her efforts on SixUntilMe.

And if you’d like to help this book get published, you can visit the crowdfunding page to learn more, back her project, and help spread the word.  The Kickstarter ends a week from tomorrow.

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Usually, there are multiple things going on. It might be visible. It may be shared. It could be a secret- only shared with your inner circle. Even without a mental health diagnosis, mental health is an important thing to keep in mind with chronic illness, like diabetes. Hell- even without a chronic illness- mental health is important. Sadly though, it’s something that isn’t often talked about or taken seriously. It’s taboo. It’s not important. It’s hard to understand. You name it- we’ve heard it. Social norms also play a role. We’re supposed to be productive members of society and not acknowledge anything negative.

Over the years, I’ve adjusted my blog.. I wanted to talk about it all together- the type 1 diabetes, PCOS, endometriosis, anxiety, OCD, ADHD, (other diagnoses), loss, and more- because like the title of my blog says- “There’s More to the Story”. I wanted to talk about it honestly- the good and the bad. I didn’t used to do this. It wasn’t until diabetes burnout hit me with full force when I was in college. That’s when I realized something. Up until that point I wouldn’t acknowledge the negative parts of diabetes- of chronic illness. I thought I had to pick a viewpoint and couldn’t move. I had to either be positive or negative so I found myself not only lying to the world around me, but also to myself. That’s when I switched how I approached my blog and life.

About two years ago, I realized that I was applying rose-colored glasses to a lot of things in my life already at the age of 22. I was starting to say that all the bad things were worth it or completely ignoring them. I firmly believe that yes I can do it. That I (and others) can get through things. But I want to acknowledge that it can suck. That it’s hard. That maybe there are systematic things that play a part too. That I should still check my privilege. That’s what life is. It’s what I needed to do.

We need to talk about and share those moments- not just for ourselves but for other people who need that honesty to know that they are not alone. We need to share the moments where we sit crying on the bathroom floor because diabetes wouldn’t cooperate all day and someone made a hurtful comment. Then we can share how we got back up to change that pumpsite and maybe to tell that person who made the hurtful comment how we feel. The how is so important. The fact that we get back up is so important. But- maybe someone needs to hear how we felt when the tears hit – how we felt when you just had enough – how it felt to let it out. We need to do that.

About two years ago, I made the decision to start a project. I decided to write a book about chronic illness and mental health. Everything I’ve talked about so far is what I applied to writing this book.

I’m aiming to balance the positive and the negative together on growing up in general but also with chronic illness and mental health along for the ride. I talk about moments of why I sat on the bathroom floor crying and how I got up. Of course I talk about more- and it wasn’t always a bathroom floor.

Over the past two years, writing this book has pushed me to process a lot of my past. All of it. I’ve seen how far I’ve come and realized the importance of so many situations.

I’m pursuing self-publishing. Because I recently graduated college (and put myself through it so I have loans) and have a social work degree, I’m utilizing crowdfunding to make this happen.

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I’ve put my money where my blog post mouth is and backed Mindy’s campaign, as I think this resource would be a powerful one for our community as a whole.  Mental health is health and I agree it needs to be talked about, shared, and cared for as openly as diabetes.  

For more from Mindy, you can follow her on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and her blog “There’s More to the Story.”  

 

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