“I’m not positive I can make it in for that appointment, since I’m traveling for work for the majority of those weeks.  Would it be possible for me to send my device data by email and have you review it for any issues?”

Without pausing, my endo said, “Yes, we can do that.”

We’ve seen a lot of one another over the last seven months, as my pregnancy has progressed.  Appointments are at least monthly and while we review the same things during every appointment, reviewing these same things is necessary over the next few weeks.  She made a note in the computer system and something occurred to me.

“Do you get paid to review those emails?”

“The emails?”

“Yes, when I email you blood sugar logs and you review them.  Are you paid for that?”

She paused from her typing.  “No.”

I never forget that the issues I have with the hospital system are not related to my endocrinologist specifically.  She’s forced to work within that system, and her ability to flex her capable caregiver muscle is hindered by billing codes and administrative responsibilities.  But I do forget that she goes above and beyond in many circumstances, oftentimes not paid for the work she does for her patients.  And I’m not nearly as appreciative of her work as a clinician as I should be.  It’s not her fault the system sucks.

“Thank you for doing that,” I said.  “I appreciate it.”  Our appointment continued.

Being a patient is hard work.  I didn’t choose this road, and I would not choose this road.  But being an endocrinologist is hard work, and her road was chosen.  I have to remember to say thank you more often.

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