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Sticky JMedical Giveaway Winner.

Through a very official and terribly complicated process of asking a friend to pick a number between 1 and 169, we have a winner!  Congratulations to Jennifer, who is a sentimental fan of Kermit.

(Yeah, I called you sentimental.  Mostly because you told me to.  Also, Sentimental Jennifer, I sent you an email this morning, so please check your inbox!)

A big thanks to everyone else who entered.  If you are interested in checking out the bracelet online at Sticky JMedical, click this link.  As far as Muppet responses, the diversity was incredible, but my favorite was the person who mentioned Bean Bunny.  (Also, did you know there is a Muppet wiki?  Say goodbye to the rest of your morning.)

Happy Friday!  And thanks for playing.

Looking Back: Of Cocktails and Community.

Today, after a lovely morning at the dentist (once again fixing this issue), I’m recovering from a half-droopy novocained face and, as a result, am looking back at a post from 2013 about search engine optimization, diabetes, and cocktails … sort of.

* * *

“So what you should do is see what people are searching for and then carefully tailor your posts to draw in those searches. Pick the search engine terms that there isn’t a high competition for, giving you an advantage in Google’s search algorithm.”

The example he used was pretty simple: “10 Best Cocktails for People with Diabetes”

In a discussion during the European Bloggers Summit in Barcelona (running alongside EASD), a search engine optimization expert gave a presentation about seeding blog posts with keywords in order to cast a greater net for readership. The SEO strategist was helpful, and had wonderful advice for people who were churning out content to get it read, but my body had a tangible reaction to this kind of advice. I felt myself prickling with frustration because is this really what people are writing for? Page views?

No freaking way. Not in this community.

So the top ten best cocktails for people with diabetes? Fucking sure. Let’s do this, social media-style:

  1. The #DSMA: Take 140 characters, a hashtag, and equal parts honesty and humor and mix them thoroughly in Twitter. Tastes best on Wednesday nights at 9 pm EST.
  2. The Blogosphere: Start with a URL or a Feedreader and slap it into the search bar on your mobile device, tablet, or computer, or Google “diabetes blogs” for a list of ingredients. Mix reading these blogs throughout your day for a boost in diabetes empowerment and community.
  3. The Flaming YouTube: Search through YouTube for diabetes, or “diabetes math,” or “breaking up with diabetes,” or “changing the song on my Animas Ping” and you’ll find a slew of video combinations to add to your playlist. (Title the playlist “Cocktails for Diabetics” and you’ll probably get a lot of search returns, but you’ll also find people who want to be found.)
  4. The Instagrammed: Take your phone, photograph any ol’ diabetes bit or piece in your house, and mix with Instagram to create a frothy, fun mix of Dexcom graphs, race bibs, brave new infusion set sites, Halloween-candy-casually-pretending-to-be-hypo-treatment, and friends who understand.
  5. Facebook Your Face: Take your Facebook account and stir gently with groups, hashtags, and posts about diabetes. It may take a while for this mixture to fully set, but once it does, you’ll have a shot of community you can take in one sitting, or something you can sip on and scroll through for hours.
  6. The Friends for Life: Take one part people with diabetes, one part caregivers, one part educators, one part inspirational athletes, one part Disney World, one part green bracelets, and a billion parts love and throw into a salad shooter and spray that stuff everywhere because in-person diabetes meet-ups and conferences will break your heart and mend it within the course of a week.
  7. The Group Text: No specific ingredients, but a drink best shared with many. And at 3 am.
  8. The Call Me: Best served when low, because a phone call to another PWD who understands is the best way to keep from over-treating.
  9. The Honest-Tea: Equal parts empathy and honesty, this cocktail is a must for people with diabetes who are looking for confirmation that they aren’t alone. It’s not about enabling, but empowering. (Goes really well with a side of Communi-Tea.)
  10. The Hug: Social media is great, but nothing is better than a hug between two people whose much-loved pancreases have taken an extended leave of absence. There is no set ‘best time’ for this cocktail – serve immediately and enjoy.

The one in the middle looks like pee, to me.

People in the diabetes community don’t communicate with one another for page views or Google search prowess. Of course, not everyone’s intentions are the same across the board, and there are people who immerse themselves in a community looking for things that aren’t as altruistic, but the majority of interaction in the DOC, from what I can see, is between people who need each other. That’s why so many of us started doing this, and it’s why so many of us continue.

Because when Google redoes its algorithm and there’s a new system for search engine optimization, when there’s an upheaval in what’s considered the “it” platform for social media, the song remains the same for the DOC. Diabetes, for many, isn’t just in your body but also resides full-time in your head, and managing emotions and support is as essential as insulin (and with a significantly lower copay). It’s not about where the discussions are taking place; it’s about the discussions that are taking place. So “drink” up!

You Don’t Look Like You Should Have Diabetes.

“And this, too, please,” I said, sliding the opened and half-consumed bag of gummy candies across the counter, my hands shaking.

This low was bad.  The symptoms were very visible, with unsteady hands and knees that were buckling out and sweat beading up on my forehead despite the 40 degree weather outside.  I knew I was the color of a cotton ball, with the mental capacity of one as well.

My Dexcom had gone off about ten minutes earlier and I picked around in my purse for the jar of glucose tabs that I soon realized were tucked neatly into the cup holder of my car.  Out in the parking lot.  (Useful.)

Necessity forced my hand to grab the way overpriced bag of candies off the shelf and consume a handful.  “Most expensive low ever,” I muttered, aware that coming up from this 45 mg/dL was going to cost me a pretty penny.  I needed to get out of the store and reassemble my wits, but lows don’t excuse shoplifting, so I made my way to the cashier to check out.

“Are you okay?” the cashier asked, probably because I looked half-removed from the planet.

“Yes, thanks.”

“These candies are open.  Do you want a different bag?  These have been half-eaten,” she said.

“No, it’s okay.  I ate them.”  I smiled in a way that I hoped looked reassuring but probably looked weirdly menacing.  “Low blood sugar.”

“Diabetes?”

“Yeah.”

She smirked.  “And here you are, buying candy.  Isn’t this part of the problem?  You don’t look like you should have diabetes.  Maybe you should stop eating candy.”

I would have rather been eating a banana, to be honest.  Treating with fruit is my preferred way to upend a low.  Or I would have rather had some measured glucose tabs so I knew how much I was consuming and could avoid the post-low rebound.  Fuck, you know what?  I’d rather not have been low at all, because being low in a public place is embarrassing and makes me feel vulnerable.

Let’s just round it out and say that I’d much prefer not to have diabetes in the first place.

“The candy is to bring my blood sugar up.  It’s to keep me from passing out here at your counter.”  It was hard to make the right words come out, but anger jumped ahead of hypoglycemia.  My voice was sharp, like the plummet on my Dexcom graph. “What does someone who should have diabetes look like, anyway?

She didn’t look at me.   And I was glad she didn’t.  I popped a piece of the candy into my mouth, my attempt at a PWD version of a mic drop.  I don’t look like I should have diabetes?  Maybe that’s the point.  Maybe she needs an education on what diabetes does look like, instead of viewing my disease as a punchline, one that society judges unabashedly.

All of a sudden, I can’t wait for November.

GIVEAWAY: My Favorite Medical Alert Bracelet.

The “long and overdue” part of this post cannot be over-stated.  I have had the best medical alert bracelet from Sticky JMedical for a very long time now and am just writing about it this morning.

But it’s lovely and discreet.  Because of that, I wear this bracelet every, single day, which helps protect me in the off-chance that something keeps me from speaking on my own behalf.

This is the bracelet that I have:

Medical alert bracelet #diabetes

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

And it is excellent in its simplicity. This bracelet has been worn while running over bridges, while carving pumpkins (it was easy enough to remove pumpkin guts from), on the red carpet, and around the house, no problem. It goes with everything. It doesn’t scream MEDICAL ALERT BRACELET, but if there’s an emergency, this jewelery is obvious in its intention.

It’s taken me several years to find an every day bracelet, but this one is it. So much so that I plan to purchase one for whoever wins today’s giveaway. If you’d like to enter, just leave a comment on this blog post with your preferred Muppet (any Muppet will do) and I’ll randomly select one winner on Friday morning. You can enter starting this morning through Thursday at midnight (and if there is a medical alert bracelet in the same price range that you’d prefer, I’m all ears).

Thanks to Sticky JMedical for creating something so timeless that writing about it a bit late is still hopefully acceptable.

[DISCLOSURE: Sticky JMedical sent me the bracelet several months ago for free but did not ask me to write about it, or host a giveaway. I decided to do that on my own because their product is pretty frigging awesome. All opinions are mine, as is my tardiness.]

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