Last night, I unpacked the suitcase I had used a few days earlier for a trip to Toronto for a conference. And then I promptly refilled the suitcase with clean clothes to prepare for my trip to Washington, DC today. It’s kind of exciting but also a wee bit of a bummer to be away from home so much.

I travel quite a bit, mostly for work-related events that bring me somewhere for a night or two, and then shuttle me back to Rhode Island. It’s a big departure from when I was in my 20’s, when I didn’t travel much at all. My 30’s appear to be the decade of departures (and arrivals), and over the course of the last few years, I’ve made a point to streamline how I travel. I used to bring the biggest suitcase in my arsenal and cram it, but now I make a game out of how far I can get with one, small carry-on.

Travel bird.

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

A reader emailed me a few weeks ago (I read every, single email but I am a sorry creature when it comes to timely responses) about travel and diabetes, asking what kinds of tips I would have for would-be travelers. I ran through a quick list in my head, and it was strange to see how what was once a hyper-prepared, diabetes-obsessed list has (de-)evolved into a quest to not bring more than I need. But there are still diabetes nuances shoved in there.

  • You need to have your government issues identification. You aren’t able to rent the car or board the plane or stay on the train if you don’t have your ID. Smart to start there.
  • You also need to be wherever you are well in time to get onto the plane, train, or spaceship. My friends make fun of me for arriving at the airport two hours before my flight – “Do you really need to get there so early? Don’t you know how to do this?” – but being on time alleviates a lot of anxiety for me. So I get there early, damn it.
  • You need your medications. Whatever stuff you need (insulin? blood pressure medication? test strips?) make sure you take, and bring a little more than you need. Most often, I travel for two or three days at a time so I bring a week’s worth of medical supplies. (It goes up from there.) When I travel domestically, I don’t worry about original pharmacy packaging for my insulin, etc. but when I travel internationally, I make sure I have the box the insulin came in.
  • People talk about a note from their doctor explaining what the different diabetes devices are and do, and I carried one of these notes for a year or two. But I haven’t had much trouble at all with explaining things, and the few times that TSA wanted to go full-grope on me, it was minimally offensive (except that one time and I hated that one time).
  • You also need pants. Or some kind of nether region undergarment that covers up your parts. Not wearing pants or similar will have you ushered out from many different situations that escalate pretty quickly.
  • And in my travels, I need to have a jar of glucose tabs or other fast-acting low blood sugar treatments within reach at all times. You never know when you’ll need to treat a low (or when you might need a burrito) and it sucks to have what you need most tucked, and out of reach, in the overhead compartment.
  • And lastly, you need a destination. Our trip a few weeks ago brought my family and I to Birmingham, then Huntsville, then back to Birmingham, AL. It was a very mellow trip (lots of very nice people, some rocket ships, a fistful of rage-filled mosquitos) and we saw some of the northern Alabama sights. (Like this rocket and this space suit and this beautiful bride.)

When I was younger, the biggest travel hurdle for me was actually booking the trip. Anxiety about traveling and being away from my comfort zone kept me from experiencing a lot of things I now regret missing. Over the last few years, I’ve broken away from my trepidation and am trying to be braver. (And judging my the miles I’ve logged over the last few years, I think I’m making up for lost time.)

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