Around 8.30 am, I took an injection of Levemir.

At about 9 am, I switched my basal profile to “OTHER” and disconnected my insulin pump.  The OTHER profile has me at 0.025U basal rate per hour (as close to zero as I can get on my pump) but still holds all my other settings.  I kept the pump in my purse and the infusion set attached to my body, with one of those pump caps (there are two that come with every box of Insets) to keep the site closed.

At 9.03 am, I put on a skirt with a loose waistband that had previously been tugged down by the weight of my insulin pump BUT NOT ON THIS DAY.

Throughout the day, my basal needs are served by the Levemir injection, but I reconnect the insulin pump to deliver my boluses (allowing me to take my meal boluses and correction doses with precision and also without piercing my skin another time because the infusion set is still in place).

Around 9 or 10 at night, my Levemir injection is pretty much toast (over the years, I’ve seen that Levemir leaves my system after 12 hours, so I usually split my dose completely on pump vacations), so I reconnect my insulin pump and spend the overnight connected, receiving the basal bump at 5 am that is delivered to combat the dawn phenomenon my body experiences.

And then, depending on what I’m doing the next day, I’ll decide to keep my pump on or off during the day.  The Levemir pen in my toothbrush holder serves as a reminder to take a morning dose, if that’s my jam.

I like having a choice.  Can’t un-choose diabetes, so having a choice as to how I deliver my insulin is a plus.

It sounds complicated, but it works for where I’m at right now, because I am aiming to make good on the whole “fit diabetes into life, not work life around diabetes.”  And as petty and superficial as it may sound, it made me bananas (read: super angry, not yellow and slippery) when I went to get dressed for the sticky, summer heat and didn’t have a good place to shove my pump.  On the waistband pulled my skirt down.  Between the cups of my bra made for weird lumps and also unnecessary warmth.

This kind of frustration is the shit that can send me into a week-long DBM (Diabetes Bad Mood) and I am trying to mitigate as much of that as possible.  So off came the pump.  On came the highly structured plan to untether in the most graceful way possible.

Keeping an eye on my CGM showed when things were working and when things need tweaking, and I felt at peace with my diabetes instead of Rage Against the Islets.  Which, while a solid band name, doesn’t do much for my emotional health.

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