Skip to content

Archive for

Diabetes Blog Week (Late): Mantra Me.

I missed the end of Diabetes Blog Week, but I loved the prompts and still have ideas trickling in here and there.  So better late than never!

I don’t like catch phrases.  (Forgiiiiiiiive me, especially since I just used a trite turn of phrase up there with the whole “better late than never” thing.  Turn the other cheek, please.)  I especially don’t like catch phrases that rhyme because I immediately lose focus on the meaning of the words and instead say “Rhyme time, rhyme time” over and over in my head, which is distracting.  (However, I do have a soft spot for “Test, don’t Guess” because it’s both good advice and fun to yell.)

But this still works for me:

It’s not my favorite sentence or blog post, but it is a sentiment that still applies, a decade after blogging and almost three decades after diagnosis.  Contrary to how my blog might portray my life, I don’t think about diabetes every moment of the day.  But diabetes does influence many of the decisions I make throughout the day, like what giant purse I bring, or what kind of breakfast I have, or what sort of exercise I do.  Or how I feel about certain things at certain times.

It’s not a back burner, but more like a crock pot that’s always on simmer.  So long as it doesn’t burn the house down, I’m fine with that.

 *   *   *

Today‘s (well, technically last week’s) prompt:  If you have been blogging for a while, what is your favorite sentence or blogpost that you have ever written?  Is it diabetes related or just life related?  If you are a new blogger and don’t have a favorite yet, tell us what motivated you to start sharing your story by writing a blog?  (Thank you Laddie of Test Guess and Go for suggesting this topic.)  Be sure to check out the posts from Diabetes Blog Week!

No Disassemble.

I need to exorcise the technology demons in my house.  Because everything is breaking.

It started several months ago, the issue with my laptop, but in the last two weeks, my computer has gone entirely bananas.  I have a Macbook Air as my primary office computer and the bulk of my work is on that machine.  And it worked fine for several years, until the trackpad on the computer started to over-react to everything.  I’d tap my finger on the trackpad and every email in my inbox would open, files would delete themselves, and browser windows threw themselves against the side of the glass.  Crazy shit.

“Why are you so sensitive?!” I yelled at the computer.

“I don’t knooooooooooooow!!” It sobbed in return.

I did a lot of Google searches, and my computer wasn’t the only one feeling super fragile and sensitive.  It was not alone.  (And if your computer is going berserk, you are not alone.)  But last week, while traveling, the computer refused to click on any damn thing while simultaneously clicking on every damn thing, it wouldn’t connect to wifi, and it bit me when I opened it.  (Sharp teeth on that little sucker.)  Because I do not work in a formal office but instead house my business entirely in a computer, I had to make the rotten decision to replace my computer.

Fine.  That problem is solved, albeit in the most expensive and irritating way possible.  Then last night my FitBit decided to go rogue on me, in the middle of an intensely competitive FitBit challenge, rendering it useless.  This morning, my Dexcom receiver did that weird “BEEEEEEEEEP!” thing where static electricity or something courses through it and it restarts on its own.  En route to a doctor’s appointment at the crack of dawn this morning, the GPS in my car took me to somewhere that was not the doctor’s office but instead a supermarket (so I bought apples).

Everything with a battery or a digital footprint is breaking.  I’m afraid.  And then I realized that the way I receive my insulin is via an insulin pump, powered by a battery, chock full o’ breakable technology.  A cold panic washed over me as I worried the tech demons were contagious.

“Shhhhhhh … you’re okay.  You’re my friend,” I said to my insulin pump, as I held it in the palm of my hand like a fuzzy hamster.  “Be good.  No disassemble.  Keep working,” I murmured to it, stroking it gently with one fingertip.

Here’s hoping.

The Friday Six: Catching Up.

Hi!  I still write here.  I write a blog about things here.  This is my things blog, with diabetes stuff and other times not so much diabetes stuff.  Welcome to it.  (My brain is not entirely tuned in this morning.  Working on it.)  Coffee is helping, but it may take a few days to kick in.

Yesterday was a long day of traveling and I can say with certainty that my five year old kid is managing her jet lag better than I am.  (And we, as a family, were all up at 5 am and confusingly chipper about it.)  Thankfully, I really love to fly.

The wifi access while we were traveling was majorly woofy, allowing me to connect for brief minutes to let emails load and then not letting me reply to them, so my inbox is a muddled mess of things I’ve read and spazzed out about but haven’t had a chance to reply to yet. I missed a lot of really excellent Diabetes Blog Week posts.

Like this one.

And this one (the photo, once you see it, is un-see-able)

This one as well.

And this, about the personification of Sugar.

Oh how I loved this one, tooAnd this.

But this one was my favorite of all.

A huge THANK YOU to Karen for bringing the DOC together for the sixth year running.  I love Diabetes Blog Week, and she works so hard to keep it fresh, engaging, organic, and inviting.  You rock, Karen.  (#meowmeowmeow)

And in non-Diabetes Blog Week linky sort of things, I wanted to make sure I share, and reshare, the PLAID Journal.  Martin will be contributing a little Q&A here about the inception and development of his journal in the coming weeks, but in lieu of that you can read his post about it here.  His work is amazing, and as a contributor and a member of his editorial board, I am really proud to be part of it.  You can view issue 1 here.

Here’s a great update on glucose-responsive insulin.

I learned quite a bit about the type 2 experience from Brian’s post.

And a big CONGRATULATIONS to the lovely Dayle and Chris!!!

Oh, some photos from our trip?  I have a ton.

I feel like I missed a lot of work in the last week, with spotty Internet access.  Woofy wifi is not my favorite, but I can’t complain too much because the distractions of traveling were worth it.  Happy to have gone, but very happy to be home.

 

Diabetes on the Red Carpet … Ish.

For Chris’s Sea of Trees premiere this past weekend at the Cannes Film Festival, diabetes was almost the furthest thing from my mind because we were so damn excited about the event.

Diabetes came into play for a brief moment when I was looking for a dress. I tried to adopt a “dress first, diabetes second” philosophy, picking a dress that felt comfortable and pretty without caring if my insulin pump fit into it. After spending some time looking for and trying on a bunch of dresses (a post I’ll never write, because I made the mistake of looking for formal ball gowns in the same week that girls were shopping for their prom dresses, leaving the ladies that worked at the dress shops very confused about why this older woman was coming in amongst the sea of teenyboppers and leaving me just as confused about my place in this world of women … not my best moments), I settled on a navy blue dress that hit the marks for fancy and comfortable without making me feel like I was trying to be someone I was not. Trouble was, my insulin pump did not fit into the dress easily. Or at all. Instead, it felt once again like I was clomping around with a toaster clipped to me. Which is why I decided to go on injections for the night and not wear my pump. Going MDI meant I needed my CGM data more than ever, though, so I kept my Dexcom sensor on my lower back, underneath some of the lace overlay for the dress, which perfectly masked the subtle bulge of the transmitter. (Hee hee … bulge.)

Thankfully, going back to injections and monitoring via Dexcom receiver wasn’t too tricky because my insulin pens fit easily into the glittery clutch I had for the night, as did a tube of Glucolift. I decided not to carry a glucose meter for the night because it was too bulky. Chris tucked my Dexcom receiver into the inside pocket of his tuxedo (“You turned it to vibrate, right?” “Yes, I promise you won’t go off during your own movie.”) I deliberately ran at the 160 – 180 range so I wouldn’t go so low as to need a snack or so high as to need to dash to the bathroom.

Aside from checking my Dexcom a few times before we arrived at the event, diabetes took a wicked back seat to the whole experience. Instead, we were able to focus on the surreal aspects of the event itself.

Cannes SEA OF TREES red carpet

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on


CSparl on the red carpet

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

After party for SEA OF TREES at the Cannes Film Festival.

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

After a grumbly critical review the day before, it was amazing to watch the filmmakers receive a two and a half minute standing ovation after the screening. I have always felt proud of Chris and I recognize his tremendous talent as a writer (insert all my bias here), but it was so nice to hear from people who felt the same way, both in his industry and in our diabetes community alike. We are very grateful for everyone’s support, and it means the world to me to know our DOC family supports one another in diabetes-related ventures and decidedly non-diabetes adventures.

Thanks for being there on this insanely odd, hard-earned, and exciting journey, you guys. I’m forever grateful.

Diabetes Blog Week: Kicking It to the Curb.

When I was first hospitalized upon diagnosis, I spent two weeks in-patient learning the new and tangled ropes of type 1 diabetes with my parents.  My hospital roommate was a kid named Eddie, who had been bitten by a spider.  The other source of comfort was Kitty.

This grubby thing has been with me since the beginning.  My mom and dad let me pick him out at the toy store to before being admitted to the hospital, and this stuffed animal received as many paw pricks and injections as I did – albeit saline ones – during the course of those two weeks.  Kitty used to have long, fluffy “fur” that became matted and mangy from repeated snuggles.  He has a defined “waist” from me wrapping my little kid arms around him when my blood was being drawn.  You can’t entirely see his eyes, but they are in there, underneath the smushes of fur.

Chris and I moved into a new house a few months ago, and as we were packing, I had a few boxes designated as “important things.”  Those boxes weren’t put into the moving van but instead stayed in my car to keep them safest during the course of all the stuff shuffling.  One box was marked “DIABETES SUPPLIES” and in it I crammed my pump infusion sets, test strips, Dexcom sensors, etc.  And tucked neatly beside a spare glucose meter was Kitty, continuing to secure his VIP place in my diabetes supplies arsenal.

He used to live in my arms, when I was seven.  Then he moved to my shelf in college.  Now he lives in my closet, keeping watch from between boxes of Dexcom sensors.

He’s ancient.  Older than anything else I’ve ever owned.  Some people might think he’s due to be kicked to the curb, weeded out, tossed.

To this, I say, “No effing way.”  I’m planning on playing Uno with my grandkids several decades from now, with Kitty keeping watch from the closet where I’ll keep all my old lady accoutrements*.

*   *   *

This is part of Diabetes Blog Week, where blog prompts help generate a series of posts by folks in the Diabetes Online Community.  Here’s today’s prompt:  “Yesterday we kept stuff in, so today let’s clear stuff out.  What is in your diabetic closet that needs to be cleaned out?  This can be an actual physical belonging, or it can be something you’re mentally or emotionally hanging on to.  Why are you keeping it and why do you need to get rid of it?  (Thank you Rick of RA Diabetes for this topic suggestion.)”

* Like giant pairs of underpants  UNDERPANTS!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers