An example of Cards for Humanity, T1D edition. #makehealth

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This is the card one person at the meeting pulled. When their alarm went off, they got up out of their seat and dropped to the floor. Immediately, someone else sprang into action.

I watched from a distance while Michael drew up the glucagon injection and, with fumbling hands, injected it into the simulated “skin,” aka the rubber ball.

Michael’s reaction to having to following this exercise:

And this is what playing Cards FOR Humanity looked like at the meeting I attended this week.

Introducing "Cards FOR Humanity" at this #makehealth event, driving T1D empathy. #proudtobepart

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

For the last few months, I’ve been part of a design team for type 1 diabetes  (put together by the T1D Exchange and C3N – the disclosure is that I have been compensated for my time), and the team I am on decided that part of truly understanding diabetes means walking the walk.  It means understanding the subtleties and nuances of diabetes. 

It’s empathy.

“Empathy is the experience of understanding another person’s condition from their perspective. You place yourself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling. Empathy is known to increase prosocial (helping) behaviors.” – from Psychology Today

To make an attempt at helping people better understand diabetes – helping them empathize – we created a card game of sorts. Based loosely on “Cards Against Humanity,” we took that concept for a spin and created a deck of cards with scenarios and accompanying questions to walk someone through a moment in a life with type 1 diabetes.

#empathyordie #makehealth

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

#makehealth #empathyordie

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

#makehealth #empathyordie

A photo posted by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on

The discussions that grew from these cards was inspiring, and these discussions gave rise to new levels of understanding and innovation, simply because people in the room who didn’t have diabetes identified more with the people who did.

There’s no way to properly simulate “a day in the life with diabetes,” but a glimpse can be provided, and from that understanding, innovation will rise.

To download a free PDF of the discussion cards, visit Cards For Humanity.

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