“Do you pre-bolus for your meals?”

“I do.”  (I was happy to answer this question because I actually do pre-bolus.  Pre-bolusing is my A1C’s saving grace.)

“Okay, that’s great.”  She made a few notes in my chart.  “How about for snacks?  Do you pre-bolus for those?”

“I … um, nope.  I am horrible at pre-bolusing for snacks.”

Unfortunately, hat is completely and utterly true.

Meals are easier to pre-bolus for because there’s time involved in making them.  If I know I’m cooking chicken and green beans for dinner, I have 25 – 30 minutes to let that bolus sink in before the meal is even ready.  Going out to eat at restaurants is easy, too, because I usually have an idea of what I’d like to eat, so I’ll bolus for the meal once we are seated at the table.  (Pre-bolusing backfires at times, too, but as long as I’m not in the middle of the woods, I’ll take the risk.)  A meal feels like an event, and therefore easier to accommodate.

Snacks feel like an accident.  An unplanned moment.  I don’t take an apple out of the basket and bite into it in a premeditated fashion, but more like a fluid movement without any thought involved.  (A run-by fruiting by any other name …)  It’s not until I’m done with a snack – apple, yogurt, nuts, protein bar … cupcake? – that I realize I haven’t taken any insulin to cover the carbs.  My post-snackial blood sugars aren’t grateful for the misstep.

This would not be a big deal if I wasn’t such a grazer, but when 50% of my caloric intake throughout the day is on a whim, pre-bolusing for snacks matters.  My A1C is currently in my range (under 7%) but I know if I can remember even half the time to pre-bolus for snacks, I bet my standard deviation will tighten up and blah blah blah other numbers as well.

Little, conscious changes will hopefully become habit.

 

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