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What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What a low blood sugar feels likeAcross the board, a low blood sugar seems to be considered as anything under 70 mg/dL.  Revisiting the American Diabetes Association’s website this morning offers up a list of symptoms of low blood sugar, like:

  • Shakiness
  • Nervousness or anxiety
  • Sweating, chills and clamminess
  • Irritability or impatience
  • Confusion, including delirium
  • Rapid/fast heartbeat
  • Lightheadedness or dizziness
  • Hunger and nausea
  • Sleepiness
  • Blurred/impaired vision
  • Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue
  • Headaches
  • Weakness or fatigue
  • Anger, stubbornness, or sadness
  • Lack of coordination
  • Nightmares or crying out during sleep
  • Seizures
  • Unconsciousness

(As with most diabetes-related lists on the Internet, the further down the list you read, the worse shit seems to get.)  The “what happens if a low blood sugar goes untreated” answer is short, and to the point:  “If left untreated, hypoglycemia may lead to a seizure or unconsciousness (passing out, a coma). In this case, someone else must take over.”

When my daughter hears my Dexcom beeping, she understands the difference between the alert signaling a high blood sugar and the alert signaling a low.  If the high alarm goes off, she doesn’t react, but if the low alarm goes off, she perks up immediately and asks me if I need a “glupose tab.”  The immediacy and seriousness of low blood sugars is noticed by my three year old because she’s seen me go from normal, functional Mom to confused, sweaty, and tangled-in-my-own-words Mom in a matter of minutes.

The symptoms of low blood sugars don’t just vary from PWD to PWD, but often vary within the PWD’s own lifetime.  When I was very small, my low blood sugar “tell” was when my mouth would go numb and my face felt like I’d had Novocaine hours earlier and it was just starting to wear off, with that tingly, prickly feeling.  Over the years, I’ve had a lot of lows with varying symptoms:

“My brain is fully functioning.  I know words.  I know sounds.  I know exactly what I need to do and what the number 42 means but my body has betrayed me and won’t move as I have asked, like I was a robot who had been over-oiled.” – Sad Robot

A video during which I went low.

“My mouth isn’t even mine.  It’s just this thing, this portal to shove giant sugar tablets into.  I can’t work up the saliva to chew, so the tab sits in my mouth until it starts to dissolve a little, and then my body remembers what to do with it.  ‘Chew the damn thing.’  Tragedy of a low – no saliva.  Nothing to help mince these tabs down into something useful.” – Bullets

“‘Thanks, and could I please have a small orange juice, without ice, as quickly as you can?  Thanks so much,’ I said to the host in one breath, hypoglycemia filling up all the space around my head like the Radiohead video for No Surprises.  A minute or two later, a glass of orange juice was on the table.  I drained it in a few gulps.” - Reduced to Rubble

“I remember my mom sitting on the kitchen floor with me, breaking graham crackers into smaller bites and putting them in my mouth, dinner burning in pans on the stove.  I remember my mom’s eyes being very wide but she wasn’t crying.  I remember a glass of juice.  I remember it was hard to chew because I was crying but I wasn’t sure why, and then there’s a sharp edit in my memory, where I don’t have any recollection of what happened next.”  – Memories

No two lows feel or look the same, but a few grams of carbohydrate (plus the willpower to wait) can swiftly save the day.  With quick recognition and treatment, lows pass as quickly as they come on (most of the time) but they are always in the back of my mind.  When it comes to diabetes concerns, the fear of hypoglycemia has been constant for the last twenty-seven years.  My purse is never (okay, rarely, but never without on purpose) without glucose tabs, and I’ve had the “this is glucagon, and here’s how to use it” conversation with more people than I can count.

What are your low blood sugar symptoms?

 

51 Comments Post a comment
  1. When I was a kid (and still – but I like to pretend that I don’t) I get clear runny noses. It’s sudden and not attractive, AT ALL.

    11/7/13; 10:03 am
  2. Ellen #

    The shakes- oh, the shakes. I know if I am on the verge of a bad low or not because of the level of shakiness in my hands. The lower I get, the worse the shakes get, to the point where I can’t get a glucose tab out of a container or hold my hand still enough to test my blood sugar. It is like I am living in an earthquake. Not fun.

    11/7/13; 11:02 am
  3. Christine #

    Low BG hits in different ways depending on rate of decent. Sometimes the change is so slow and symptoms are not present until it is way low.
    Many years ago while I was working in our store the lowest BG I have ever had occurred. It was a crazy busy day. And I got the impression that maybe I should test. The meter read “18″. I did not feel anything until 15 minutes later when I had brought it up to 35. No paramedics, thank goodness!! I was fortunate. But I was done for the day.
    Thanks for the great posts.
    Christine

    11/7/13; 11:17 am
  4. Zach #

    I’m like you where my low symptoms have changed over the years. Within the last year, I have noticed that if I am low and out for a walk, my balance is off and I have a force pulling me to the right. It’s kind of strange, anyone else have any balance like symptoms?

    11/7/13; 11:42 am
    • ria #

      Zach
      I have actually taken a few tumbles from dizziness over the years when I drop low within a short period of time.
      Best advice is to find a spot to sit down …take a few minutes, check your blood, breeeathe, and stand slowly until that feeling passes.( and your blood again until in normal range)
      Some medications and other health conditions can cause dizziness, as well.

      11/7/13; 2:56 pm
    • Jennifer #

      I totally to relate to the variance in symptoms, but I one that scares me the most is when I’m out for a run (or even just walking sometimes) and I realize I can’t feel my leg(s). It takes every ounce of concentration to lift the leg and wait for they sensation of pressure to hit high in my leg or hip. I know if I don’t sit down within the next few steps I will fall. I think the most I’ve made is about 10 steps after that sensation hits. At that point if I don’t have glucose tabs on me, I’m waking up to paramedics. Sometimes, I can’t even get the glucose out. How HUMILIATING! The weird thing is, as humiliated as I am, I have nothing but compassion for those that I see experiencing a similar event.

      08/30/14; 1:22 pm
  5. Lindsay #

    One of my weirdest low blood sugar symptons is anxiety or feeling overwhelmed. Lately if I’m thinking of things I need to get done but feel at the same time this feeling of hopelessness that I will never get everything done, sure enough, I’m low. Sometimes my vision gets weird too…like spotty or slow to focus. LOWS SUCK!!!

    11/7/13; 12:21 pm
  6. I have gotten to witness lows now in both my husband and my daughter. I used to get mildly annoyed with my husband because he’d be able to tell me he was low, but not actually DO anything about it. I’ve sprinted to the bar asking for a “Sprite Quickly!” more than once in restaurants while we were waiting too long for a table. I’m always a bit irked on weekends when we’ll be driving somewhere on a family outing and he’ll start to go low, behind the wheel of the car and ask me if I have snacks in my purse. Um yes, why don’t you? I think weekends really throw off his routine, but still… after 14 years, he could maybe start to plan ahead.

    I think after 14 years, I’m a bit more sympathetic at least to how poorly he thinks DURING the low. Also, he actually suffered from hypoglycemia symptoms for his entire life, long before he was finally diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 34, so we dealt with lows for our entire relationship, even before insulin started inducing them. (all the more reason why you’d think he’d be in the habit of always carrying carbs)

    On the other hand I’ve watched my daughter hand me her meter at a party with a 21 on the screen, and go skipping off to play with a friend while I stood dumbfounded that she was even standing upright… and then chased after her with a juice box. Other times a 65 would have her slithering from her breakfast chair into a heap on the floor underneath the table. It seems the rate of falling may have something to do with how bad the low feels, at least for my loved ones.

    It’s almost like a random number generator.

    11/7/13; 12:30 pm
  7. The problem is that if I have symptom, which is rare, I don’t recognize them when I’m low. So I’ll check before I get in my car and drive. Two weeks ago it said 43. I checked again and it said 39. So I had drink the juice and wait until I was up enough to not be a road hazzard. I can not tell you how often I’ve had to call and apologise for the fact that I was going to be late for something because of things like this.

    11/7/13; 12:42 pm
  8. Jon Lewis #

    I feel like it could be tough to diagnose low blood sugar with so many apparent symptoms indicative of low blood sugar levels. Very informative post!

    11/7/13; 1:08 pm
  9. Nicole #

    Mine are always different. Sometimes I get quite low and feel nothing. Other times I feel very tired, shaky, have a hard time moving around and functionning properly (especially mentally. I try to keep glucose tabs in all my bags and the car.

    I was at Costco recently and tested quite low. I was alone so wasn’t sure if I should buy a case of choclate bars or head to their food stand for a gigantic ice cream. Of course those both sound like good ideas when your brain is fuzzy! I decided against both ideas and was then going to break into the honey I had bought, but thankfully there were sugar pills in the car!

    11/7/13; 1:27 pm
  10. Katie S. #

    My favorite low symptom is not being able to concentrate. Like if I’m reading a book I won’t feel low, but I’ll read the same sentence 5 times in a row without comprehending what the words mean. That’s usually my cue to test.

    11/7/13; 2:09 pm
    • Sheena #

      I am only now realizing that that is a symptom for me as well.

      03/8/14; 11:30 am
  11. June S. #

    Between 1972 and 1982 (the first 10 years of my life with the “Big D”) my hands used to shake when my blood glucose level was low. Fortunately, I got my first blood glucose meter in 1982, just as the “shaking hands” symptom of a low BG started to disappear! Now, I’d say the ability to concentrate is a big symptom, as is a terrible feeling of worry (big-time anxiety), and sometimes EXTREME tiredness. Every low is different, and I think the worst feelings come on when the blood glucose is in the 60′s (I have rarely been in the 50′s) or is dropping precipitously. If I see double arrows on my Medtronic pump (courtesy of my CGM) I can expect to feel awful (in one way or another) very soon!

    11/7/13; 2:25 pm
  12. My symptoms have changed through the years. When I was young they included shakiness and dizziness. Usually now I have a tougher time sensing them, but on the occasion I do, I have anxiety, sweating, heart racing, or a numb tongue. Lows are so annoying… and sometimes very scary!

    11/7/13; 5:40 pm
  13. A low for me includes a difficulty in holding onto one thought and acting on it – as in ‘get something to eat’ and then before I can follow through with that I think ‘maybe I’ll just sit here some more’ and then ‘look – a squirrel.’ A few minutes later thinking…”I was going to get something to eat, right?’

    I have difficulty in stringing words together to speak – or maybe my brain is in neutral and just can’t get my body to spit out those things that help us communicate thoughts and ideas to each other…you know, those things with the letters…..words.

    A general felling of exhaustion – like you just spent the entire Saturday working out in the yard. This doesn’t quite go away even after the blood sugar goes back up.

    A slow response time to what my eyes and ears are telling my brain. I’m sure if you threw me a ball, I would start to catch it long after it bounced off my head and down the street.

    11/7/13; 6:48 pm
    • Sheena #

      wow.. Brian, that is me to a “t”. Even after I have been able to raise my levels, I still can’t concentrate, think, or react and am exhausted for hours afterwards. I have also noticed that if I am not careful to pay attention to my levels I can easily reach the point of passing out shortly after I have the symptoms you shared.

      03/8/14; 11:34 am
  14. Walter #

    I’m another ’72 diagnosed person (41 years in December). I remember “woozie” (woozy?) from those years. It was the perfect word. Onomatopoeia (great Todd Rundgren song). There would be a little cartoon figure in the teaching literature. (No word or figure for highes as I remember.) Woozie worked then. Many years later lows (and highs) changed, and have contininued to change. Today they are sometime sneaky and come out of nowhere. Others are more obvious like delayed eating after a shot. (I’m MDI and machine test.) The worst lately have been pernicious lows that won’t respond to carbs/glucose, or that go up a little and then crash again soon after. Happening a lot at work lately.

    11/7/13; 7:53 pm
  15. The symptoms have definitely changed over the past 58 years. Lack of clear vision has been consistent. Now I see reddish orange globs floating in front of my face. In the past I would see objects in the room stack on top of each other, the numbers on my watch cascading in stair steps from the watch crystal into the air, and once looking out the bus window I saw rows of people lined up on in layers on top of each other, waiting for other buses. I’ve also suddenly found myself on the floor in an attempt to get to the kitchen. Several years ago, after shoveling snow off of my car in the apartment parking lot, I remember walking up the stairs to our apartment and starting to go to the kitchen for some juice. The next thing I knew I was flat on my face on the living room rug, still wearing my parka and boots, and our cats were on either side of me crying. The worst lows arrive very suddenly with no warning. I’ve got glucose tabs stashed everywhere, in almost every coat and several places in the car, but they take a long time to dissolve. There was a glucose spray that was made in Canada. I kept it in the car until it got so gummed up I couldn’t use it anymore. When I went to replace it the store no longer stocked it and I haven’t seen it any place else.

    11/7/13; 10:11 pm
  16. Marilyn from France #

    This week I woke up with a blinding light. From habit I managed to check my BS which said 19 though I’m sure it was not that low. I found a little hole in the blinding light to find my finger. Opened the glucose tabs and had I don’t know how many.

    When having a low colors usually get brighter but this is the first time I’ve had the blinding light. Lucky my brain and hands were still working.

    Like a lot of you – also lack of concentration and anxiety during the day with a low.

    Let me take this opportunity to thank you for your wonderful blog. I won’t miss a day without visiting.

    11/8/13; 1:25 am
  17. Allison E. #

    My worst lows have pretty consistent symptoms: anxiety; sweating; confusion / denial about the low; racing heart; numb tongue and jaw; and bright circles of light in my field of vision. When the circles appear my denial disappears because I KNOW I’m low.

    11/8/13; 12:22 pm
  18. Ana from Argentina #

    What it feels like? Nothing! No symptoms whatsoever. Like this morning: on the treadmill by 8 as usual and then it all becomes sort of a blur… I know I had a large mug of tea afterwards, somehow got into the shower and out, I vaguely remember crying because I couldn’t find any clothes to put on, eventually got dressed (outfit OK, guess part of my brain was on autopilot), and I remember thinking I had to call my husband because something was not right… Then my son got up (he works nights), gave me a glass of OJ and things started to make sense again. But by then it was 11 o’clock! Needless to say, I was drained and went back to bed for a nap. It’s 3 pm now and I feel like I run a marathon…
    Ana

    11/8/13; 1:00 pm
  19. Adrianna #

    No one has mentioned becoming belligerent; I’ve told my husband to leave me alone…. Once told a friend, “I don’t have to do what you tell me to; you are not the boss of me.” (Rather like a three year old; and of course later was very embarrassed!)

    11/8/13; 4:05 pm
  20. My main symptom is racing heart and for some reason, frequent swallowing. Weak legs and overall body… lack of focus, staring into the distance, shaking, irritability, snapping, sadness.

    I am 29, diagnosed 1.5 years ago… thank you so much for this blog. It seems there is not a lot of info out there for people with T1, you really have to dig for it. I also feel like my healthcare team gives me the bare minimum info each time I visit and doesn’t do a lot to get me excited about taking care of my diabetes.

    11/9/13; 9:57 pm
  21. My son – who is 15 years old – gets weak and very hungry.

    11/10/13; 3:32 pm
  22. Aoife from Ireland #

    Stubborness, hunger, rambling, irritation, confusion and a general feeling that my brain is trying to catch up with my body (or vice versa, it’s hard to tell sometimes!).

    I sometimes know I’m low but I still wont have my glucose drink, for no good reason, I just get it in my head to not have it.

    If my BG drops fast I have been known to be down to 43 (2.4) or lower before I’d notice and test. If it’s a gradual drop I’ll know I’m going low by 80 (4.5).

    It’s great to read about everyones experiences though, nice to know other people totally get it too! Good to share :)

    11/11/13; 2:44 pm
  23. Beth #

    Reading these comments is like reading a journal of the last 10 years of my life! My symptoms change often, sometimes quick soaking sweat, sometimes confusion, sometimes shaking, sometimes meanness (just ask my hubby and kids), sometimes an inability to put whatever I just got out to eat into my mouth… I see it, but can’t seem to actually get it to my mouth, and sometimes I will have no symptoms at all!! Sometimes the symptoms start at 60, sometimes I am 20 and don’t feel that bad… Such a strange disease!! As a healthcare provider who is also a diabetic, I really understand what my patients are going through!! I never go anywhere without food….. I can stuff a granola bar in a swimsuit, workout clothes, a formal gown, or a hat! Never leave home without food!! Just in case….

    11/11/13; 9:26 pm
  24. The most embarrassing for me is the loss of my emotional and social filter. Anything I feel I will do. If I am intrigued by how the box of Rice Krispies in my hands would feel being poured over my head, there it goes. I will move from historical laughter to tears in seconds. And the filter that says, whatever you do, don’t actually say that horribly mean and sarcastic comment, it gets turned off and things I regret later come flying out of my mouth. At least those around me usually understand and just enjoy the roller coaster that is diabetes with laughter ( sometimes it’s the only way to deal)

    11/12/13; 11:01 pm
    • Sheena #

      wow.. things suddenly make a lot more sense. thanks for sharing!

      03/8/14; 11:41 am
  25. Claudine Halcomb & Nicholas #

    Thank you for writing about Diabetes. I have seen some of your blog posts and the Vlog of your low is a good example for people to see. I just went through the list with my son Nick, and he read your blog post. He is 10 years old, and type 1 going on 3 years now. Many of the symptoms he felt and as a parent you feel so helpless to be there and help your child. It never gets easier. A cure is the only way.

    11/13/13; 9:40 pm
  26. I experience tons of anxiety when I have a low blood sugar. I also begin to have paranoia.

    11/13/13; 9:46 pm
  27. Katrina Hanson #

    I get lows a lot, but the worst is when i am demoing for the class (I’m a cosmetology instructor) and I’m having a low…..i start alluring my words, and i don’t realize what I’m saying. Random words come out. I start sweating, get clammy, blurred vision. My hands can’t seen to do what my brain ifs telling then to do…..Overall i act like a drunken mess ! some days are definitely harder than others.

    11/20/13; 10:57 am
    • Amy #

      I’m a nurse and when my blood sugar drops while I’m working with a patient, I feel the same way. Sometimes, I can say (if my brain will let me)…”I have to ask dr about something.” And excuse myself long enough to down sips of a regular Coke or juice.

      04/30/14; 12:17 pm
  28. Amy #

    It’s such a blessing to read other’s experiences with low blood sugars. Thank you all for sharing your experiences! It’s hard for me to explain to my husband that if I’m too low to actually know I’m low…I can’t treat! He gets very frustrated with me. He will say (as if it’s a simple, logical thing to do)…just eat something! Well, easier said than done when you’re brain is bogged down with a 42mg/dl blood sugar!!

    04/30/14; 12:12 pm
  29. Felicia REYES #

    Since my body is used to my blood sugar being so high, and now with my eating better and it going a lot lower than it’s norm. Is it normal to feel these same effects as low blood sugar? If so how long until your body gets used to it? I hate feeling like this, it almost wants me to make it high just so I will feel normal, ughhh.

    05/9/14; 11:17 pm
    • Nick Goff #

      Well don’t make yourself go high again! Hahaha I’ve had Type 1 Diabetes since I was 2 and I’m 18 now. I have experienced exactly what you just said a few times!! Like I’ll go on for a week or so with steadily high blood sugars, and it starts to feel normal. Then all the sudden one day you feel sooooo low and you go to test but you’re at like 140 or something… It usually takes my body a couple days to adjust to being in normal range again and feeling low when I’m actually low! I hope this helps! :)

      05/19/14; 6:04 pm
  30. nathan #

    I think everyone is the same in that they experience more and more symptoms as the hypo worsens. For me my awareness usually kicks off with feelings of depression and lack of motivation and the inability to think straight. I also usually start sweating to some degree. As my hypo gets to the worse I have them, and this only happens about once a year, I get very confused to the extent that I feel that I am going mad. It is just because of one of these is why I am writing now. I just want to share or at least try and share that experience.

    How does it feel? I find it very difficult to explain, it feels painful but not physically, more like my mind is being drained away and I am left with just emptiness; but then again there are thoughts being pushed at me but they don’t mean anything and it is again painful as I am trying to make sense of them. for this hypo I woke up at around 4 am, my wife was in our poorly child’s room, I knew I was low so I got up and felt I had plenty of time so I had a couple of bananas. I find these effective but I have to wait a few minutes for the effect to kick in. I started to leave the kitchen and the mental assault started. I felt like I had to run away, from what I wasn’t sure but it felt like a powerful paranoia. I felt I was losing it, I ran up the stairs and shouted twice my wife’s name very loud because I thought I would soon lose the ability to do anything but slump to the floor and perhaps lose the ability to know what I was doing. I immediately turned, locked my intentions on getting down the stairs and to the sugar cupboard because I wanted to pour sugar down into my mouth. I knew I had to make it before the thoughts got any more painful, it was a worse fear and something I didn’t want to slide into. I collapsed onto my knees in front of the cupboard, grabbed the box of sugar and tipped its contents into my mouth. I was petrified as I thought at any moment my mind would be gone and I would fall into my deep confusion. My wife, bless her reactions, was already beside me and pouring orange juice into a glass and she was aiming to help the sugar down with it!! I rested my head on the cupboard and just wanted to reassure my wife that I thought my hypo was now under control, I just needed a minute to let the sugar have its full effect.

    As the sugar kicks in it feels like being reborn. Sense and warmth flooded back into my body, and I just want to talk about how I felt and the confusion of the thoughts. Well, on this occasions as I was talking the kids were stirring as I had also woken them with my shouting. My eldest daughter gets very concerned at the best of times and now she was shaking with concern. I tried to explain that I am in know danger as I always have sugar on hand, but it does worry me as the children do see me being very vulnerable and thinking back I think it would have upset me to see one of my own parents in such a situation.

    05/28/14; 3:15 am
  31. Gina Whittaker #

    I’m so glad i took the time to read all of the comments . I know feel almost normal, I was starting to feel like I was crazy ! I have been experiencing lows for a while and finally started monitoring everything I eat and all my readings . I have a hard time getting to and staying at 70 and feel like I’m constantly eating .

    06/11/14; 8:21 pm
  32. Kristen #

    I have never had symptoms of low blood sugar until earlier today. I was cashiering at work and all the sudden, my legs grew weak, I was sweating all over and trembling. I didn’t know what was going on but I had something in my instincts telling me to get candy. So immediately I bought a coke and two candy bars and scarfed them down. I felt better instantly. It was terrifying!

    06/12/14; 12:22 am
  33. Guest #

    My legs start to sweat. I feel hungry.

    07/18/14; 7:39 am
  34. Shelly #

    When I have a low I get confused, feel like I just want to go to sleep, some times my hands jerk so bad I cant even hold anything. Most of my lows happen in the middle of the night. I set my alarm to go off every 2 hrs. Some times my Boy friend will wake me up telling me I need to check my blood because I’m clammy. Most of the time I’ll say ok and just fall back to sleep or get on the computer trying to figure out the password thats gonna help me with my low b/s and I keep typing it over and over. I see things sometimes,when I was married to my x I swore he put me in the shower and hit me. Sometimes I get mad and refuse to eat.
    Ok I know lows are not funny but, I just thought about something. One day after lunch I decided to take a nap so I set my alarm to go off in an hour. I guess it went off but I went back to sleep. Anyway my bf mom came in to check on me and i was in a coma. She calls 911 and they give me the good stuff. One of the drivers tells me I was doing some kind of leg lefts and counting 20,21,22,23,100. Also said when he asked me my weight I said 2,000 pounds.
    I have also just broke out running. I kinda have this feeling I’m in a dream and nothings real. My bf says I sometimes kiss him all over his face and keep telling him I love him.
    My boy friend gets real upset with me so sometimes when I start to have a bad low I wait tell he doesnt see me and i get food or a drink. He will always the next morn ask me what happend this time in a sarcastic way. Then I have to hear his mom tell what all went on and I really don’t care to know. I know there is a lot of yelling, good for me I can’t remember most of it.

    I have really enjoyed reading all the other post.

    p.s. forgot about my eyes. They kinda jump when im low.

    07/18/14; 12:15 pm
  35. Zainab #

    When I get low I just get really really hungry. Like I need to eat right now and I’ll kill anyone who wastes my time or gets in my way. I haven’t actually killed anyone yet though… My heart pounds inside my chest and I get sweaty quickly. Even though my heart is beating a lot I feel like it can stop at any second. When i’m sleeping I usually find myself running to the kitchen without remembering that I woke up and got out of bed. Once or twice a weird dream woke me up instead of my beating heart. I don’t get low at often or as intensely as I used to since I got the omnipod though. Now when I get low it’s slight and just feels like I’m hungry and haven’t eaten yet. And it usually happens after a meal was late or skipped altogether, like normal people.

    08/12/14; 5:40 pm
  36. Susan Howell #

    I get those symptoms, and can usually tell when I am heading down. About 1:00 I start getting nauseous, light headed, weak and “blurry”. At about 80 BG I try to get something quick (sugar water) but I do not want to eat. The thought of food makes me want to throw up! Anyone else feel this?

    08/21/14; 7:06 pm
    • Jer #

      Yes, I too have that feeling. I was put hrough hell for two years and when I told my MD that I thought I was hypoglycemic he only checked my BS, which at that time was normal. I am currently waiting a second opinion. But I know my BS drops because I bought my own monitor. Thank you all for this blog and for sharing your feelings it’s good to know I’m not alone.

      09/24/14; 4:15 pm
  37. MaryAnna #

    I was on google using “when I take a nap and I get up I feel my heart racing, loss of vision, sweating profusely dizzy” as my search engine and I was brought to this page.

    This happened to me again yesterday, so often I’m exhausted somewhere and when someone tells me to lay down for a few minutes, I try to race home before anything happens (not too smart)

    I get home and take a nap and I got woken up by phone ringing, I then got up and wham, it happened to me again.. I remember telling someone nearby that I needed something with sugar I remember seeing glass of kool-aid in fridge and I drank (too fast, got nausea) had to sit or lay back down. This happens when I nap and I know this but so drained physically/emotionally that I still NEED to lay down..

    I’m going for a physical next week I’m going to make sure I address this as a possibility, not cool, I have grand kids with me a lot and I want to make sure I can be well so they are safe!! I hope this is not the case, but, pretty sure it has something to do with sugar. Thanks for your posts, makes me think!!

    08/31/14; 7:08 am
  38. matt #

    Literally just had a crash, sweating shakey confused and not great atwords. Anyone else Eva feel confused and slow in the thoughts for the rest ofvthdv day after levels back up?

    09/2/14; 10:50 am
  39. Maggs #

    I was diagnosed when I was 12 as hypoglycaemic. I’m not diabetic, but I’m keeping an eye out for symptoms of it, because I’ve been told hypoglycaemia can be a precursor.

    It all started when my school lunch period was moved. I started having regular “attacks” where I would feel intensely dizzy, sweat profusely, and my vision would blacken. I never lost consciousness, but occasionally I would say things during these episodes (which lasted seconds) and have no memory of it. On one such occasion, I repeated “Ow ow ow ow” over and over, though I wasn’t in pain. On another occasion, I was in the process of walking down a set of stairs and would have seriously injured myself had I not grabbed the handrail as my vision went black.

    I’m now 29, and have learned to cope with it through diet. I eat plenty of protein, and always keep some kind of sugar on me in a pinch. Full blown attacks like those from my childhood are rare now, and usually occur when I’ve done something foolish like missed a meal or exercised on an empty stomach. My usual first symptom these days is actually irritability. This is followed by lightheadedness/dizziness. Because I recognise these symptoms for what they are, it doesn’t usually go further. I have also taught my husband and coworkers to recognise these signs, and keep glucose tablets and juiceboxes at work for an emergency.

    Some oddities. I have learned that too much routine isn’t good for me. Once my body becomes used to having food at, say, 6pm, I find small delays are likely to result in an attack. So I try to keep things varied, because my body isn’t then expecting food at a particular time and my sugar level will not plummet immediately following an expected mealtime. I have also discovered that if there is no other option, drinking water will temporarily “trick” my body into thinking sugar is coming. I bought myself some time with that one once when I was foolishly walking home on a hot day with nothing but water on me.

    Who knows what the future will bring? I don’t know if I’ll one day be diagnosed as diabetic, or just forever by hypoglycaemic, but it’s somewhat comforting to see so many other people dealing with the same kind of attacks.

    09/13/14; 8:01 pm
  40. SallyMJ #

    My first symptom usually is my right leg gets shaky/tremors when I’m sitting down – if it’s very low, both legs and hands shake, and I have balance problems.

    I often get a headache – the worse ones having the symptoms of a migraine – nausea, sensitivity to sounds, smells, light. I can get really, really irritable with people, where I have to apologize later, and I am unable to focus on any task. I also get dry mouth.

    Too high a dose of Prozac can have the side effect of amplifying my hypoglycemia. Once, by mistake, I took too high a dose of Prozac for several weeks. I got the regular symptoms of hypoglycemia at first. But later, I became shaky all over. One day it resulted in extreme vertigo where I couldn’t even crawl, let alone walk. My body was so shaky it seemed like convulsions, and I had to call 911. That was scary.

    I now carry glucose tablets and protein bars with me. Sometimes in the market, I will buy a small container of milk and drink it before I even get to the check stand.

    I have non-diabetic hypoglycemia, but I think my low blood sugar symptoms can be experienced by diabetics as well.

    10/14/14; 2:34 pm
  41. Jordan #

    My first symptom is usually either shakiness or this horrible weak feeling in my bones, which is both the worst and hardest to describe feeling I get from a low. I almost always have either or both of those, but I’ve also had headaches, a numb tongue, a feeling of anxiety for no reason, nausea (rarely, usually just when my blood sugar is at least 400+), and dizziness. If I just woke up or was sleepy, I sort of get this feeling like it wouldn’t be so bad to just lay there and not do anything, and I have to sort of snap myself out of it.

    I also suppose I have hunger, but that doesn’t really describe it for me. It’s nothing like being hungry, it’s more like this desperate instinct to eat EVERYTHING. My body knows something is wrong and that food fixes it, so it feels like every cell in me is telling me to eat as much as possible. I have to restrain myself or I shoot my blood sugar too high.

    The lowest BG I ever had was when I was a kid – 21, 15 minutes after I had a ton of soda, so probably much lower. I was walking through the parking lot with friends and randomly started wandering off while they were calling me, and I just remember this hazy feeling like everything was far away. They got me in the car and had me drink the soda, but they didn’t know how to use my meter and we had to wait and check it when we got home, as fast as possible. I ended up being okay, with no need to visit the ER.

    10/15/14; 1:16 am

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