« Tune Up. | Main | Merry Christmas! »

Quick Friday Bits and Pieces

The Friday Six:  December 21, 2007Heading out the door for the holiday weekend -- but first:  The Friday Six!

1.  I'm a huge fan of Pandora, with its station creation capability and how it shows me all kinds of different bands that are in line with other bands I already like.  Today, a co-worker led me to SeeqPod Music, which is like a programmable Pandora.  You don't have to download any music and it's safe for work environments that won't allow you to download software to your computer.  It's like iTunes on the go. 

2.  Ye Olde Bridal Shoppe called me today and told me that my wedding gown has arrived and I need to schedule my first fitting.  I.  Am.  So.  Excited.  I'm curious to work out the pump pocket plan.

3.  Speaking of pumping, I will start on my Paradigm 522 tonight.  My arm site, which has served me well this week, is finally starting to feel a bit sore when I bolus, so it's time to pull it out.  New infusion set will bring out the New Pump.  And next week, I'll trial the Minimed GCM component for a few months.  More on this later.

4.  Last night's run proved that even the most awkward parts of me can eventually be trained to a higher level.  I felt stronger during my run last night than I have over the past two (grueling) weeks.  Chris tells me that running is a great way to burn fat fast, in preparation for May.  My plan is to keep at it at least through the end of January and see what kind of headway I've made.  Who out there has done some running?  How do you manage those rapidly-falling numbers?  Ed suggested working in some protein to my pre-workout snack.  I'm game to try anything.

5.  Can't focus.  Silliness reigns supreme.  What the heck are these cats doing wearing Santa hats? And how can I get Sausage to sit still long enough so I can do the same to her?

6.  We're off to RI for the Christmas holiday, spending some quality time with friends, Romans, and countrymen.  After we brave 95 North for 59,047 hours first.  Grrr, highway.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to all of you.  Stay healthy!  And for crying out loud, have some fun.

Comments

I run on a treadmill top of lifting weights 4 times per week. on average, I run about 2.5 miles. I usually eat a banana before my workout every day. My blood sugar is usually 70-100 before I eat the banana and generally, I am around 100 when I finish my workout.

One really interesting thing I have found is that my blood sugar crashes are much less frequent than when I first started running. I used to have a lot of problems with lows during and after running.

I think that as your body gets used to running you might find that you go low less frequently.

I've been listening to Pandora lately. I'll have to check out that other site.

Have a very Merry Christmas!! Wish Chris and your family Merry Christmas from me...thanks :)

Ugh, the running lows are annoying! I lower my basal and eat a banana about 45 minutes before I run. I make sure my blood sugar is a bit higher than I usually have it, 140-150. Doing that usually enables me to run longer without having to stop. I also disconnect while running if I'm doing a long run (4+ miles). You'll figure out what's best for you. Try testing every 10 minutes or so until you figure out when you're crashing.

I hope you have a wonderful Christmas Kerri & Chris!! Be safe on the roads and enjoy your time with family.

As you can see from my card this year, the trick is not the hat, it is the outfit.
Put an outfit on a cat and they have no balance = cannot move.

And my cats have LOVED being dressed up for my card these past two years. :D

P.S. Invite friends over, there are many people in the background making my picture happen.

is it just me, or do none of those cats look happy?

Ah, running. My husband is an avid runner and I reached my peak of running capacity (so far, I hope) during our engagement. There's nothing like the being the bride to get you motivated to work out :)

I would usually have some fast acting carb: fruit, juice, granola bar, etc. just before running. That way I didn't have to start the run high (which makes you sluggish) or worry about getting too low during the run. Also, I ran a lot before I started pumping, now I'd probably lower my basal rate by about half for a couple hours prior to the run, just so I'd have less insulin on board. As you already experienced, running will drop your blood sugar very efficiently! For me, this lasted for several hours. I tended to run in the evening and had a difficult time avoiding overnight lows after a hard run. Less basal insulin plus more snack should do the trick.

Good luck Kerri... running is great, especially once you've built up some endurance. I'm actually looking forward to jogging/running a few months after the baby arrives. I've missed it!

Merry Christmas!

We'll be right around the corner for Christmas. Hope yours is great, what with all the Romans and countrymen.

Hi Kerri,

Taking a chance on answering your running question.

I usually run first thing in the morning. About 5:30am.

I never eat before running and make adjustments based on my waking blood sugar reading. If I'm high, I have a pretty good idea of how much humalog to inject. (I don't use a pump.) I've been doing this for 10 years so it's kind of second nature to me. (The running and injecting thing.)

If I have a low while running, I eat one, two or more glucose tablets and wait to get home to check my levels. Again, it's something I've developed a feel for.

I'm guessing that since you pump, your continuous basil rate may have something to do with the rapidly falling levels. My routine is to take 4 units of Lantus first thing in the morning. It doesn't have that same kind of effect... at least not that I've experienced.

As for how far I run, it's between 3 and 5 miles on any given day, depending on how I'm feeling.

Here's a for instance: If I wake up and my blood sugar is say... 150, I take 2 units of humalog and my usual 4 units of lantus. I then do my morning routine and am out of the house within 25 minutes. Because of the "dawn effect" and the running, (all my self conceived theory) by the time I arrive back home, in about 20 to 35 minutes, my readings will be in the 80 to 100 range... on a good day.

I usually stretch and do some body weight exercises after the run, then shower and have breakfast. All in all the routine takes about and hour to an hour and a half.

It works for me. But one thing I noticed is most responders say they eat or drink something before running. I never do. Can't run with anything in my stomach. I like to think of the run as a hunter gatherer searching for it's morning meal. Spear in hand, out in the wilderness. Hunger gives you drive.

Anyway, that's my way. Good to see you taking an active role in your good health. Keep it up.

Andy

P.S. One more thing. If my blood sugar is high, such as over 200, when I wake-up, my run starts really slow. At a snails pace. And I gradually pick it up as I go. That excess blood sugar acts like sand in your gas lines. You don't want to do any more damage than absolutely necessary. It can even be counter productive to work out hard when you have high bs levels. Hope this helps.

Wishing you and Chris a glorious Christmas, and a safe drive both directions!

I just finished a half marathon (toot toot...that's the sound of my own horn) and had to learn what worked for me as far as avoiding lows. I would usually eat 15-20g of carbs with some protein (cheese crackers, South Beach bar, or half a pb & j sandwich) before my run if I was starting out with a normal bg and wouldn't bolus for it. I also turned my pump off during runs. If I started out a little high (anything above 150) I would still eat the carbs but left my pump on. I also checked my bg at my halfway point of any run. That's what worked for me but we're all different. I've heard of people drinking milk during workouts to help stablize bg, but I just couldn't stomach that!

Hi Kerry,
My son started CGM last week as an add on to his Paradigm 722 (whch we got in July). It is working very well so far and I look forward to seeing how you go.

One thing that I am interested in is how to make the subtle alarms of the Paradigm pump wake up a sleeping 10 year old?

Have a great Christmas!

Diana

re #4: yes, it's hard. i have issues with running & dropping sugars too. i can drop 200 or more
during a longer run. i am SO glad to have my pump because it makes it wayy easier/more possible than shots (and with less snacks). a lot of times i still end up starting the run high (high 200s, 300s), which really sucks because i feel sluggish and icky and thirsty, and often will still end up under 80 when i finish.

i slash my basal rate pretty drastically, starting 1-2 hours before. i make sure if i have any boluses (food or correction) that will be still in my system when i run, i reduce those too. i also have come to terms with the fact that i usually have to eat a little during a longer run. i used to really hate the idea (extra non-satisfying snack, having to stop, having to carry things) but recognizing this has made it easier, and allowed me to have better/longer runs. since you're running on a treadmill it's less annoying, cuz then you don't have to carry the food with you while you run. i usually opt for a few glucose tablets or some gatorade; easy to take quickly and fast acting when your blood is pumping to your legs and not stomach and digestion is slow.

happy running!

Kerri - I am also a 522 pump wearer and a CGM user. And I recently got married. At my wedding, I wore my pump without the clip inside a pair of 'spanks' pantyhose. The hose are tight to the skin, so it held the pump in place. I didn't want a pump pocket, as it would have ruined the line of the dress. As regards to running, I also suggest lowering your basal rate. On the CGM, you can set an alarm for when your BG drops below a certain level (eg 75), and you can eat something or drink juice before your start to feel the low too much and have to stop running for a while. It is one of the best things about the CGM!

Post a comment

(All comments are moderated. Thanks for your patience!)